Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County, PA

Archive for March, 2015

Artist Spotlight: Melissa Swift and the Recyclable Art Contest

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

20150327_152842_resized“If you can see beauty in everything, you are an artist.” –Anonymous

Melissa Swift has been teaching art at Fairfield Elementary School since 2007, a position she filled after Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) Board Member Louise Garverick retired. Melissa credits Louise with connecting her to ACAC and introducing her to the Recyclable Art Contest and Exhibit, an event sponsored by the Gettysburg Recycling Committee and McDonald’s, which invites students across Adams County to submit pieces constructed entirely of recyclable materials. This year marks the show’s 20th year, making it the most long-lived event at the the ACAC.

Before inviting her students to showcase their work at ACAC, Melissa holds her own contest at Fairfield Elementary. Participation is voluntary – it’s not a graded project. The children work on their recyclable art projects at home, but the kids look forward to participating every year. She does set aside one day of class time to talk about why it’s important to recycle and to show examples of past projects, encouraging students to think about how they can turn someone else’s trash into an aesthetically pleasing treasure. This year, she discovered students had already started their projects before she even announced the contest. Fairfield Elementary’s contest boasts 48 entries this year, all of which will be invited to participate in the exhibit at ACAC. “There were actually fewer entries this year than last,” Melissa said, “but they are all of high quality, so they will all be invited to participate.” Melissa works hard to teach the children how to transform their work to its highest potential, worthy of aesthetic appreciation.

For the ACAC contest and exhibit, each student may submit one work of art that does not exceed a size of 36 inches in any direction, and that is constructed entirely of recyclable materials. The projects are rated by a panel of judges based on the following criteria:

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Claudia Bricker (2nd grade) points to her garden collage constructed with all recycled materials. Claudia received First place in 2014 in the Fairfield Elementary Show.

  • integration and transformation,
  • creativity, individuality, originality and uniqueness
  • and presentation.

Cash prizes are awarded to the top four entries in each of the following categories:

  • Grades K-2
  • Grades 3-5
  • Grades 6-8
  • Grades 9-12

One piece will be selected as
best in show.

Artists are invited to submit their projects on March 31 and April 1, and the show will open to the public for First Friday on April 3. Awards will be presented on Saturday, April 18. A People’s Choice award will also be presented – be sure to visit the show to cast your vote, and reinforce the message that if we stop to look long enough, there truly is beauty in everything.

Some photos of the Fairfield Elementary entries for 2015:

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Photos: A Magical Evening with Kelly Corrigan

Posted on: March 26th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

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It was most likely the largest crowd ever assembled in the Adams County Arts Council–close to a sellout crowd enjoyed a fun evening full of laughter and great conversation with New York Times bestselling author Kelly Corrigan last Friday, March 20. Many thanks to all who came!

Also a huge thank you to the following sponsors:

Event sponsors:

ENJOY the following photos, capturing the FUN spirit of the evening, by photographer Casey Martin. (Tip: Keep an eye out for some of these photos to appear in the next issue of Celebrate Gettysburg magazine.)

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Setting the scene for a lovely evening: live jazz music by Pomona’s Trio

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Lively bidding–some of it competitive–on the evening’s silent auction items!

 

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WellSpan Gettysburg Hospital President Jane Hyde (Title Sponsor) with author Kelly Corrigan and Adams County Arts Council Executive Director Chris Glatfelter

 

 

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Event Co-Chair Lisa Cadigan welcomes the crowd

 

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The one and only Kelly Corrigan!

 

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Attendees enjoyed meeting Kelly and having their copies of Glitter and Glue signed

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There were even a few brave men in attendance!

 

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The event’s planning committee, the ACAC Marketing Committee with Kelly Corrigan

 

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What made the committee laugh? Kelly said, “Remember it’s almost ‘the best part of the day.'” (You had to be there… to get the joke.) 🙂

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The Similarities Between The Hunger Games’ Katniss Everdeen & Glitter & Glue’s Kelly Corrigan

Posted on: March 17th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks
Kelly Corrigan - "Will Travel for Charity" - coming to the ACAC this Fri, March 20!

Kelly Corrigan – “Will Travel for Charity” – coming to the ACAC this Fri, March 20!

By Elle Lamboy, ACAC Marketing Committee Member

There’s nothing quite like the feeling you get after you read a good book cover to cover.

A feeling that I’ve missed since my son Brooks was born and he introduced me to the wonderful world of motherhood. Suddenly, he gets any and all feelings I can handle.

Thankfully, my membership in the Adams County Arts Council re-invigorated my love of reading by introducing me to Kelly Corrigan’s new memoir, Glitter & Glue (coming to the ACAC this Friday! Click here for details!)

On a recent road trip to New Jersey, with Brooks snoozing in the back seat, I made my husband’s day by saying, “Sorry, babe, I won’t be too chatty this car ride. I’m going to read Glitter & Glue.”

As he feigned disappointment he replied, “Good for you…I haven’t seen you read a book since The Hunger Games.”

I read The Hunger Games series in 2011.

As I finished the last page of Glitter & Glue on our return trip home and closed the cover with a great sense of accomplishment I looked at my husband, with tears in my eyes, and said, “That book made me want to laugh, cry, and call my mom all at the same time.”

“Sounds quite different from The Hunger Games,” he said.

At first, I agreed with him. But, the more I thought about it; there are actually several similarities between Katniss Everdeen, the protagonist in The Hunger Games, and Kelly Corrigan of Glitter & Glue.

They Are Both Anti-Establishment

In The Hunger Games novels, Katniss bands together with fellow revolutionists to rebel against the Capitol’s corruption.

In Glitter & Glue, Kelly is fighting to get out from under her mother’s roof stating, “Things happen when you leave the house.”

While Kelly’s mother longed for her to, “…walk out the door and go to an office, like everyone else,” Kelly had other plans. She craved “life experience” and the only way for her to obtain that was to hop on a plane with her best girlfriend and head to Australia.

They Are Both Unlikely Caretakers

At the start of The Hunger Games Katniss is running around the woods with her best friend, Gale, shooting her bow and arrow and hating everything conventional. Yet, when her sister is in danger of heading to the Hunger Games, she sacrifices herself and fights in her place. She steps into the role of caretaker again with Rue and Peta.

Kelly may have gone to Australia to break free from work and obligations but she ironically ends up landing the most stressful, heavy, rewarding, and laborious job in the world—childcare. Being a nanny to young kids is challenging in a “normal” family situation. But, Kelly cares for two children who lost their mother to cancer. They not only need someone to take them to school, cook them dinner, and go to the park, but also someone to make them feel whole again. It seems like an impossible order for someone like Kelly. But she goes from considering herself a “weird new appendage hanging off the sagging mobile that is the Tanner family” to “feeling so much” for Milly and Martin Tanner.

They Are Both Survivors

Katniss is the epitome of a survivalist. She keeps her family and community afloat while living in District 12 and comes out as victor in the Hunger Games.

Kelly is a modern day survivalist. She manages to survive and thrive as nanny and surrogate mother for the Tanner family. Later in the book, she’s a successful author and mother of two. She has a loving marriage. She is a caring and present daughter. She’s a philanthropist. She’s an inspiration.

Sure, reading about Katniss fighting for her life and the lives of everyone in the other districts was exciting. But, as a new mom, there was nothing more inspirational or hopeful than the end of Kelly’s book. When she realizes that even after all her exciting trips around the world, exhilarating book tours, and a high-powered career, the greatest adventure of all is daily survival alongside her family.

They Both Gain An Appreciation For Their Mothers

Katniss starts out resenting her mother, but develops a new admiration for her when she sees her caring for other warriors and, later, for herself.

Kelly goes through a similar transformation throughout Glitter and Glue. When she first leaves for Australia she can’t wait to get away from her mother. But, as she finds herself in the “mom” role with the Tanner family, she begins to listen to her mother’s voice in her head instead of mocking it.

Before Kelly left for her trip she preached that there is no “poetry” in words of complacency like, “ground-beef special, informational interview, staff development.” Yet Kelly finds herself miles away from home, gaining her “life experience” by emulating her mother, “…stockpiling hamburger meat, sorting through hair dyes, demanding eye contact, staring down the occasional adversary.” But, she’s not resentful, or ashamed. In fact, she “ find[s] the likeness kind of exhilarating.”

Unlike Katniss’ journey, Kelly’s adventure rang very close to home for me. As a new mom, I find myself appreciating my mother, and moms everywhere, in a very different way. And while I tended to fight my mom’s voice ringing inside my head when I first moved out on my own, I find myself searching for it now and, like Kelly, smile when I do something my mom did or yell something she screamed at me over and over again.

But, I must say, some nights as I’m trying to get dinner on the table after my 9 to 5 with two hungry boys yelling my name, life is also a bit like The Hunger Games.

Artist Spotlight: Linda Fauth

Posted on: March 11th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks
Linda Fauth, "at home" in the ACAC's kitchen

Linda Fauth, “at home” in the ACAC’s kitchen

St. Patrick’s Day is upon us and seems like the perfect time to profile a culinary instructor who enjoys focusing on “spring greens.”

Linda Fauth, long-time consumer science (“home ec”) teacher, may be retired, but she is still enjoying sharing her culinary and creative skills with a new group of students of all ages, through classes at the ACAC.

A native of Red Lion, in nearby York County, Linda says she inherited many of her talents from her mother. “She was a great cook and seamstress,” Linda explains, “So the apple didn’t fall far from the tree!”

After graduating from Albright College with a degree in family & consumer science, a move to New Jersey, and the earning of her master’s degree in education, Linda settled in Adams County in 1978.

She taught numerous classes including culinary and nutrition classes to middle schoolers in the Upper Adams School District, for more than 30 years, retiring in 2011.

Since then, she has taught numerous adult and children’s classes at the ACAC, including a tofu workshop; one of the highlights was creating a chocolate silk pie made with tofu.

“I have good, standard recipes I’ve used for many years, but I’m always trying new things,” Linda says. “Cooking Light is my favorite book and magazine for discovering new recipes.”

A previous class participant

A previous class participant

Linda is always modifying her classes, especially to reflect the trend towards more healthful eating.

Her next class for adults, “Spring Market Cooking,” includes several recipes featuring kale, considered one of the healthiest, nutrient-dense foods.

Spring Market Cooking!  Thursday, May 14, 6-8:30 pm Learn creative ways to prepare healthy appetizers, entrees and desserts using kale, asparagus and spring’s lush bounty.  Prepare and eat a kale salad, Portuguese kale soup, fruit salsa, a light entrée and something sweet and sumptuous for dessert.  Linda Fauth, $45 ($42 member) Register

One of Linda's former ACAC students proudly displays her edible creation!

One of Linda’s former ACAC students proudly displays her edible creation!

Linda also enjoys teaching 9, 10 and 11-year olds, through summer arts camps at the ACAC. Three years in a row, she has taught students how to make kid-friendly dishes they can easily replicate at home: smoothies, soft pretzels, mini pizzas, macaroni and cheese, and more.

“Sewing is Fun” is another popular camp Linda has taught for several summers. She abides by a special motto when it comes to her students’ creations. “I always tell my students they should like their projects and finish them—I always stay after class to help students finish sewing their projects if need be.”

Here are Linda’s upcoming 2015 summer arts camps:

Sewing is Fun! July 27-31 (ages 9-11) 1-4 pm  Spend the week learning both hand and machine sewing skills and see how easy sewing can be… and fun too!  Choose your own fabric and create your very own chef’s apron, a tote bag, and decorative pillows. Linda Fauth $152 (member $142) Register

Cooks in the Kitchen July 20-24 (ages 9-11), 9-12 pm  Begin your journey into the culinary world by learning about nutritious fun foods. Develop confidence around the kitchen- learn about proper measurements, safety issues and what kitchen tools to use! Make favorites: soft pretzels, orange julius, ice cream, mac and cheese, and fresh salsa and more! Linda Fauth $160 ($150) Register

Previous "Sewing is Fun" campers

Previous “Sewing is Fun” campers

One of Linda's previous kids' cooking camps

One of Linda’s previous kids’ cooking camps

Previous "Sewing is Fun" campers

Previous “Sewing is Fun” campers

Spending time in the kitchen isn’t a chore to Linda: “The kitchen here (at the ACAC) is awesome—it’s so easy to set up and involve the class in the cooking process. Afterwards, there’s plenty of room for us to eat as well!”

When she’s not cooking at the ACAC, Linda enjoys spending time as a food and wellness volunteer through the Penn State Extension Service, making presentations to schools, business meetings, and other groups. One of their current programs is called Dining with Diabetes.

She also enjoys sewing for her grandchildren; her latest creations have included dresses, a Hawaiian shirt, a puppet theater, and alphabet charts.

Linda says her favorite, prized recipe of all time is a family recipe that’s been handed down for generations, for sticky buns. But she also enjoys making sourdough starter, baking bread, cakes, cookies and cream puffs.

Her neighbors likely consider themselves very lucky. She says she often shares her culinary creations with them—but along with those tasty treats comes a request: She always asks for their honest feedback on all new recipes. Sounds like a delicious relationship!

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An ABC chart Linda made for her grandchildren

 

 

 

 

Waldo’s Arts Community & Diane Cromer to exhibit at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center in March

Posted on: March 6th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

By Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator

Artist: Chris Lauer

Artist: Chris Lauer

Waldo’s Arts Community artworks and Diane Cromer’s artworks will be on display at the Adams County Arts Council’s Arts Education Center, 125 S. Washington Street, during the month of March.  The ACAC will feature Waldo’s 2D and 3D artwork in the Gallery and Diane Cromer’s collection of artwork in the Studio and will host a First Friday reception from 5-7:30 p.m. on March 6th.  Along with the show openings, ACAC instructors, Jack Handshaw and Bert Danielson will be on hand to demonstrate their craft and The Storytellers will be performing live music as part of the First Friday festivities.

The Waldo’s Arts Community, formerly Waldo’s on Stratton, will demonstrate their diverse range of style and subject matter, to include painting, sculpture, photography, mixed media, printmaking, hand lettering and jewelry.  The 10 member group has been working separately and creating separately to prepare for the March 6th opening.  Prior to closing their doors last fall, Waldo’s was an active group of artists whose mission was to support and nurture the creative community.  The idea behind Waldo’s was to introduce young people to the creative lifestyle of art and music.  Founding member, Chris Laurer, says, “it will be a neat experience for this particular community of artists to come together as a group and show our work together.”  Lauer continues, “We have a few new members and I’m pleased that we’re still growing and finding new artists to be a part of this community.”

Artist: Diane Cromer

Artist: Diane Cromer

Also on display in the Studio through the month of March is a collection of realistic wildlife and landscape paintings and drawings by Hanover artist, Diane Cromer. Cromer, a self-taught artist started painting 30 years ago and is inspired to create work that conveys her appreciation of nature.  She says, “I like to place the viewer in the environment of the subject.  Our daily emotional survival depends on seeing beauty.”

For more information about Waldo’s Arts Community, Diane Cromer, other Arts Council exhibitions, art classes, news and events at the Arts Council’s Arts Education Center, call (717) 334-5006 or visit us today!

Gettysburg’s very own “Van Gogh” works with some of the biggest names in the performing arts

Posted on: March 3rd, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

We are thrilled to partner with Graphcom and Celebrate Gettysburg magazine as media sponsors for the March 20 event, An Evening with NY Times Best-Selling Author Kelly Corrigan! Today we spotlight an extremely creative and colorful division of Graphcom, Field and Floor FX:

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Have you ever created a 7-foot tall cotton candy treat? Doug Gardner, director of Field and Floor FX, has. No, this particular cotton candy won’t give you a monster-sized cavity, because it’s a prop.

Doug and the team at Field and Floor FX, a Graphcom company here in Adams County, work with some of the biggest names in performing arts. They print digital flags, floors, and costume fabrics, as well as create larger-than-life props for illustrious programs like the Santa Clara Vanguard Drum and Bugle Corps, of Santa Clara, California and Onyx Color Guard, of Dayton, Ohio.

Working hand in hand with the creative minds behind these performing groups, Field and Floor FX translates their vision in 3D, which often involves being elbow deep in paint, or whittling out impossibly cool props like the Michelangelo of high-density foam.

In a feat of visual interest, Field and Floor FX worked with Cypress Independent Color Guard, of Houston, Texas to create luggage props for their show, which, through reflection and stylistic approach, is an ode to the personal life of Marlene Dietrich.

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“There is a high degree of competition with and between the ensembles we work with,” Doug says. “We work with talented show designers to bring their visions to life. The inclusion of creative props can catapult the overall look of a show making it unique and setting it apart from the competition.”

The impact created by the oversized and scaled luggage pieces did just that for Cypress. The pieces were created using high-density foam blocks and were enhanced by vinyl graphics on all sides giving a 3D look from a distance, though the luggage pieces were actually flat on all sides.

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The Field and Floor FX team also created a number of show-stopping props for Santa Clara Vanguard Drum Corps 2014 production of Scheherazade. “It is incredibly rewarding to take someone’s vision and create something unique that surpasses their expectation,” Doug says. “The challenge with these creative endeavors is that not only must they be visually pleasing and help the ensembles tell their story, but they must also be extremely durable and logistically functional.”

The first of the projects for Scheherazade were 24 lightweight stacks of pillows that were utilized by performers during the production. Performers danced on top of them and created various staging opportunities that lent to the overall dramatic effect of the show. The pillows were hand carved from high-density foam for durability and strength. They were then hand painted. The last step to give the impression of real, sumptuous velvet pillows was to apply added detail through vinyl graphics. The finishing touch on this project was to attach tassels to each pillow, a design element that also connected the props to the drum corps’ costumes. (Click here for a brief YouTube clip of the performance, including the “pillows!”)

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This performance included unique feather fans created by Field and Floor FX to add to the overall effect and theme of the show. The bases of the fans were created using vacuumed form molded medallions.  Doug added ostrich and peacock feathers in a variety of colors to compliment the style and color pallet of the show design and costumes. Reflective mylar tape was added as a detail and special effect to catch and reflect the light giving the fans a majestic appearance.

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Field and Floor FX also created large-scale props using design elements that reflect and compliment the overall style and period of the show. The backdrops were created using vinyl graphics that were applied to contour shaped high-density PVC board. The colorful design element was carried over and used throughout the entire production. The large-scale props, fans, and pillows work together as a whole to paint a picture for the audience.

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Van Gogh said, “Great things are done by a series of small things brought together.” If this is indeed true, it is no wonder that all of the detail put in to each Field and Floor FX creation does its part to create a great show for the performing groups lucky enough to work with them.
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 To learn more about Field and Floor FX, click here!

Artist Spotlight: Anna (Fetter) Robison

Posted on: March 2nd, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

Anna-fettucine-handsCulinary Arts Instructor Anna (Fetter) Robison Shows How Food Is Art, Appealing to All of our Senses

I first met Anna (Fetter) Robison when she was the head chef at Pomona’s Woodfired Bakery Café (now Fidler & Co. Custom Kitchen) in Biglerville.  From the beginning, her talents in the culinary arts were obvious: the restaurant was always filled with people and delicious smells – the aromas were just a teaser to the tastes that followed. It was also impressive to watch her craft beautiful and tasty dishes while managing a kitchen staff often made up of her siblings. The oldest of six, Anna grew up in Cashtown with a strong sense of family. Watching her run a kitchen, it was obvious she and her brothers and sisters hold each other in high regard and with mutual respect. She runs a tight ship, but acknowledges, “Yelling isn’t good for anyone. Respect is a two-way street.”

Anna left Pomona’s to focus on time with her family, and she approaches parenting in the same no-nonsense, fun-loving, mutually respectful way she runs a kitchen. Mom to a precocious and adorable five-year-old who also loves to cook, once a week Anna encourages her daughter Emily’s creative exploration by allowing “experimental soups” for dinner, which Emily makes and serves to the grown-ups. Anna respectfully tastes whatever is served. After all, if Emily is expected to eat what is in front of her, Anna feels it is important to offer the same respect. That said, Anna admitted with a smirk that when her daughter’s “soups” are too difficult to choke down, she and her husband might creatively distract Emily before cleaning their plates in the sink. Some day they will all laugh about this together.

Cooking adventures with her daughter have inspired many of the children’s classes Anna teaches for the Adams County Arts Council. Earlier this year, she offered a Mommy & Me Frozen-themed cooking class, inspired by the popular movie. This summer, she is excited to offer a Princess Cooking Camp, where students will be introduced to cuisines paired with the appropriate princesses, including dishes like New Orleans-style jambalaya, inspired by Tiana of The Princess and the Frog and a sea-foam smoothie and shell pasta salad, inspired by Ariel of The Little Mermaid.

pasta-dishIn addition to her wonderful work with kids, Anna is also a culinary artist with much to offer adults. Her specialties include fresh pasta and seafood dishes. These evening classes can be a great alternative to a typical night at a restaurant – students enjoy a social evening of learning, interaction and great food. The experience offers food that is not only delicious, it’s also beautiful. Tantalizing smells fill the classroom-kitchen. The culinary arts allow students to experience food with all five senses, making it a uniquely appealing art form.

Anna is thoroughly enjoying her teaching experiences at ACAC, and she aspires to teach full-time some day. A graduate of the Gettysburg High School Tech Prep Culinary Arts program, she had all good things to say about her experience there, and would ultimately love to return as a full-time instructor. In the meantime, you can find her working at Hickory Bridge Farm, a family-style restaurant in Ortanna, and teaching all she can at ACAC.

A Taste of Anna’s Talents

Anna-pastamachineIs this article making your mouth water? Come see Anna on Tuesday, March 10 at 6 pm, when she offers Pasta, Pasta, Pasta! Students will learn to make delicious pasta dough for ravioli and lasagna, as well as a collection of sauce recipes. Register here!

Anna has also graciously volunteered to coordinate the catering and food service for the ACAC’s upcoming event, Glitter and Glue: An Evening with Kelly Corrigan on March 20. This promises to be an exciting evening of good food, live music, and a wonderful presentation and book signing by NY Times best-selling author Kelly Corrigan. The event is part of Corrigan’s “Glitter and Glue for Good,” (#ggforgood) benefitting a variety of non-profits across the United States. Register here!

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