Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County, PA

Archive for April, 2016

It’s HERE! Arts Benefit Children (ABC) 50/50
April 26-28

Posted on: April 25th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

In preparation for our exciting online event, ABC 50/50, we have spent the past few weeks introducing you to prominent members of our community who have one thing in common: they all recognize the importance of creative thinking and aesthetic expression in connecting us to each other in community, which consequently maximizes our quality of life as human beings.

Ed W Clark GETT - March 2014

Ed Clark

In our first article, you met Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site, who explains the importance of using the artistic and aesthetic aspects of our town to teach its rich history to generation after generation. An understanding of history informs our treatment of others, our politics and our plans for the future both as a local community and as a united world. The artistic monuments, books, paintings, plays, and museums are just a few examples of how that history has been shared in Gettysburg with people from all over the world.

Marty Qually

Marty Qually

Next we introduced you to Adams County Commissioner Marty Qually, who creatively thinks of our county as “a canvas, and there are 100,000 people with paintbrushes.” He says, “My job is to help all of them paint this county into something better than it was.” Commissioner Qually reminds us that to do a good job at whatever your career may be, one should find a creative “niche” from which to do it.

Marc-thumb

Marc Jalbert

We introduced you to baker and entrepreneur Marc Jalbert, a successful business owner in the Gettysburg area for over 20 years, who began his career with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in painting from the University of Southern Maine. Jalbert’s arts education still informs decisions he makes with his business every day, and we as a community reap the benefits when we visit his beautiful bakery and sample the artisan breads and pastries he offers in service.

PresidentRiggs2015_thumb

Janet Riggs

In a political climate where liberal arts degrees are often discounted, Gettysburg College President Janet Riggs recently offered her thoughts in an editorial in the Miami Herald: “Politicians are doing a disservice to us all by blasting the liberal arts. Residential liberal arts colleges prepare students not only for professional success, but also for lives of civic impact. Our world needs more people — not fewer — with this kind of preparation.” She goes on to emphasize that an education that focuses on creative thinking in a variety of disciplines produces citizens who “go on to have rich and diverse careers in human services, marketing, business, research, human resources, consulting, and education,” noting that her own liberal arts education and major in psychology eventually landed her a position as the president of a prestigious college.

I wish we could profile 100 more people in this series – We are so blessed to live among a diversely creative group of people in this community, each of whom makes a lasting contribution to the tapestry of our lives. I know I am not alone in my desire to continue improving upon our quality of life while preparing the next generation of creative thinkers and community leaders. We all have an opportunity right now to help make that happen.

Join us April 26 through the 28th and make your donation to the ABC 50/50 campaign.

Why “50/50”?

We are asking for $50 donations over a 50-hour period, from Tuesday April 26 at 8 a.m. through Thursday, April 28 at 8 a.m. It takes three $50 donations to send a child to a summer arts camp. Will you help us send kids to camp and classes this year?

Can’t spare $50? We will be so grateful if you can make a $50 donation (or more) toward this campaign; however, if $50 seems too steep, every $0.50 counts, too. Remember the success of our 2014 campaign? We were able to send 20 kids to camp with your $1 to $10 donations. It all counts, so make your donation today!

How can I help?
It’s as easy as A-B-C:

ABC-LOGO-webA. Visit adamsarts.org/sponsorship on April 26 and make your online donation.

B. Share, email and tweet this information to all of your contacts on social media. Your sharing is essential to the success of this campaign.

C. Be sure to watch (and share) our progress online! How many $50 donations can we receive in 50 hours? We will keep you posted on the sponsorship page and on Facebook and Twitter throughout the event.

This event was made possible by the volunteer efforts of the Adams County Arts Council’s Marketing and Development Committee:
Lisa Cadigan, Chair
Anne Cherry
Carol Cook
Joyce Ettenger
Chris Glatfelter (executive director, ACAC)
Nanette Hatzes
Wendy Heiges
Karen Hendricks
Elle Lamboy
Polly Patrono-Carlson

FB

Marc Jalbert on How to Be an Entrepreneur:
Major in Art

Posted on: April 22nd, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series leads to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28. Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Marc

Marc Jalbert

Today’s article is features Marc Jalbert, entrepreneur baker and owner of the Gettysburg Baking Company, which is nestled in the corner of Lincoln Square in Gettysburg.

Adams County residents as well as visitors from near and far are familiar with the Gettysburg Baking Company, its baker/owner Marc Jalbert, and the beautiful and delicious artisan breads and pastries the bakery offers. (If you’re not – go visit and buy a seeded twist!) Jalbert has been a successful small-business owner in Adams County for twenty years. During that time, various incarnations of his bakery/café have seen success thanks to high quality products, impeccable customer service, and beautifully designed, well-managed spaces.

How did Marc Jalbert come to be such a successful entrepreneur and fixture in the Gettysburg restaurant scene? Was he a business major? Did he study hotel and restaurant management as an undergraduate? These are answers one may expect from a successful restaurateur, but Jalbert actually began his career with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Southern Maine.

Marc_seededtwist

Marc’s famous seeded twists

After teaching art briefly at a private school following graduation, Jalbert realized he “wanted to do his own thing,” so he started freelancing as a graphic designer. Sitting behind a desk all day soon grew tiresome, so he followed his curiosity to learn how to bake – a job that allowed him to be up and about while working with his hands to create an aesthetic and delicious product. “I naively thought baking would be easier than cooking,” Jalbert confesses. But he also feels that his naiveté kept him in the game to keep learning. He took a few classes at King Arthur Flour in Norwich, Vermont after working as a self-taught baker for about six years, and moved to Gettysburg in 1995 with the intentions of establishing a bakery business and storefront.

How did his fine arts degree prepare him for running a business? “Every challenge that comes up can be thought of as a design problem,” says Jalbert. “Whether it’s marketing and designing logos and communications materials, setting up a space that is an efficient and user-friendly place to work and visit, or managing a staff, an artist is trained to look at the whole as well as its parts and how they fit together.” Jalbert had the additional benefit of being raised in an entrepreneurial environment – his dad owned a barbershop in Maine. An avid reader, he continues to read and learn as new challenges arise, but he says he uses his fine arts major every day.

Marc_bakery“Artists are trained to be mindful and pay attention,” says Jalbert. “As an art student, you are trained to stop and look at things – it’s a more open-ended means of problem solving, which may be more suited to ‘jobs of the future.’ Who ever heard of a webmaster 20 years ago?” Rather than education that strictly trains for a task, Jalbert suggests we consider focusing more on education for creative thinking as jobs that didn’t even exist in the not-so-distant past continue to evolve in our society.

If you visit his shop and pay attention, it’s easy to notice the details of the artist in the space, from the warm and welcoming color scheme, to the use of space; from the accessories carefully chosen to display his wares, to the beautiful details in the shape, texture and color of each loaf and pastry. And don’t forget the taste. Everything is delicious.

Marc_stickybunsAs we kick off our Arts Benefit Children (ABC) 50/50 event on April 26 to raise scholarship funds for children to attend arts camps and classes at the ACAC, remember fellow community members like Marc, whose business contributes so much to the quality of life in Adams County. It is largely thanks to art education that Jalbert is able to contribute so much to our community as a small business owner and entrepreneur. Help us continue to foster new generations of creative thinkers and doers by participating in ABC 50/50. Stay tuned for more news on this exciting event.

ABC-Med-Blog-640w

Summer Flashback!

Posted on: April 20th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks

Photos by Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator

summer flashback 1

Chefs in the kitchen, Putting It All Together! Summer 2015

April… a transitional month that combines gorgeous sunshine-filled days as well as rain-splashed days, as we take a step closer to summer.

And summer is one of the busiest and happiest times of year at the Arts Education Center thanks to the fun lineup of Summer Arts Camps that enrich the lives of hundreds of area children!

As we gear up for another fabulous summer season, we want to let the community know how much these camps impact children’s (and families’) lives. In just a few days, from April 26-28, we are launching an online event, Arts Benefit Children (ABC): 50/50 to raise money for scholarships that help many area children attend summer arts camps.

Meantime, if you are a parent or grandparent interested in enrolling your children/grandchildren in summer arts camps, feel free to take advantage of a special offer available through May 2, 2016: Buy 2 camps, get the 3rd at ½ off! (Click here for the online schedule.)

Enjoy taking a look back at photos and testimonials from last year’s 2015 Summer Arts Camps season:

summer flashback 2

Beautiful sounds & syncopated rhythms are coming from the Gallery thanks to ACAC Youth Choir Camp, Brent Talbot, Director, Matt Carlson, Assistant Director.

 

summer flashback 3

Mask Making campers are learning how to create zentangles! Stanley Gilmore Instructor.

 

summer flashback 4

The Art of Mask Making!!! Masks are on their way to completion!! Stanley Gilmore, Instructor

 

summer flashback 5

Get Your Dance Groove On campers are striking a pose! Hope Lawrence Instructor

Testimonials, summer 2015:

How was the class registration process? Easy, painless (consistent answer from the majority of families)

What summer projects were favorites?

  • All of them! (consistent answer from many families

The Preschool Ballerina and Bears campers liked:

  • The gummy bear dance
  • Dancing with boys
  • The end of week dance for family
  • Dancing with new friends
  • Savannah enjoyed the dance steps she learned and has been dancing around the house
summer flashback 6

Chef Chris Rinehart has prepared a fantastic menu for the Chef Camp for Foodies campers!

 

summer flashback 7

Wow!! Look what our Sewing is Fun campers made!

 

summer flashback 8

Ballerinas & Bears campers are performing for their family & friends for their end of camp week party!

More summer 2015 testimonials:

Can you share any specific comments about the camp your child shared with you?

  • They liked everything
  • Loved coming every day
  • Wished it was longer
  • He learned a lot
  • She was very excited to come everyday and wrote “I had fun with this ‘extrodanary’ teacher!”

What did your child like most about art class?

  • Everything!
  • Creating his own unique mask
  • Learning new recipes and mixing things

100% agreed–Yes, they would recommend the art classes to others!

Summer Arts Camps received an average 4.85 out of 5 rating!

summer flashback 9

Sewing IS fun!!! Linda Fauth, Instructor.

 

summer flashback 10

Castles Castles Castles campers are creating some incredible castles.

 

summer flashback 11

Mr. Jack has prepared a table for 13….potters that is! Dirty Hands Pottery camp… dig in!

 

summer flashback 12

Linda Fauth, Cooks in the Kitchen Instructor, is preparing for today’s menu which will include peach cobbler, personalized pizzas and red bean quesadillas. Yum!

 

summer flashback 13

Fun With Weaving Camp, Joh Ricci Instructor

 

summer flashback 14

Build a House camper with Instructor Erica Woodworth.

 

summer flashback 15

Happy ACAC Guitar Camp students

We hope you join us online, to transform and enrich the lives of area children, April 26-27, for ABC: 50/50 (Arts Benefit Children). This is the 3rd annual ABC event, which has proven to be a successful event with great community support for which we (and many area families) are extremely thankful. It has also proven to be an essential event, supporting scholarships that have allowed dozens of area children to attend summer arts camps as well as arts classes throughout the year. Stay tuned for more details on the upcoming 2016 event!

ABC-Med-Blog-640w

 

 

Marty Qually: “Find Your Niche”

Posted on: April 14th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

Article by Elle Lamboy and Karen Hendricks

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series is leading up to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28: Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Marty Qually

Today’s article is the second in this community-based series, featuring Marty Qually, who serves as one of 3 Adams County Commissioners.

Politics and the arts rarely mix—especially in the current Presidential campaign climate!

But, that’s what makes Adams County’s only Democratic Commissioner, Marty Qually, unique.

Marty was first elected to the Board of Commissioners in 2011 and is now serving his second term.

According to the county’s website, prior to becoming a County Commissioner, Commissioner Qually was an Adams County Auditor. With his background as Auditor, much of his focus as a Commissioner has been and continues to be promoting projects that are both fiscally responsible and sustainable. Commissioner Qually also serves on a number of boards including the Adams County Economic Development Corporation and regularly attends community meetings focused on quality of life, economic sustainability, and rural concerns throughout the County.

The Commissioner is a “strong advocate for the arts.” While he confesses he, “couldn’t draw a straight line” as a child, he started exploring various art forms after college. When he was introduced to the art of dreamcatchers, he discovered his niche. Crafting his dream catchers and developing his own personal style encouraged Marty to create his own hand-blown glass beads. Through this creative process, he discovered his inner artist and found his first creative outlet as an adult. When asked how others can find their creative outlet he suggests, “Try lots of different creative things until you find your own niche.”

As Commissioner Qually’s experience shows, art doesn’t always come naturally but it’s important to keep exploring until you discover the area of art that clicks with you personally. Commissioner Qually didn’t start out in the arts field, but through exploring several art forms, he found something that allowed him to create beautiful things and express his creativity. As the Commissioner observes, “art adds beauty to our world and we all need a little beauty in our lives.”

The summer camps and classes at the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) are the perfect launching pad for “finding your niche” as an artist. Many of the individuals at the camps are trying an art form for the first time; and all of the instructors embrace both novice and expert arts alike. With over 30 camps and classes at affordable price points, taking a summer class often ignites the inspiration to unlock one’s inner artist. From cooking classes and wine tastings, to writing workshops and computer lessons, to pottery and painting, the ACAC has something for all ages and levels of interest.

Commissioner Qually is a huge supporter of the camps and saw a creative awakening in his son through the camp experience. His son, “attended several pottery camps at ACAC and realized he has a gift and passion for sculpting.” The best part about his son’s experience, Qually continues, is that his son “learned to be creative for its own rewards and not for others’ approval. His artwork is an outlet for him.”

Above all, Commissioner Qually feels his affinity for the arts has helped him be a more creative diplomat, sharing, “As a public servant, I think of the county as a canvas and there are 100,000 people with paintbrushes. My job is to help all of them paint this county into something better than it was.”

We hope you join us online, to transform and enrich the lives of area children, April 26-28, for ABC: 50/50 (Arts Benefit Children). This is the 3rd annual ABC event, which has proven to be a successful event with great community support for which we (and many area families) are extremely thankful. It has also proven to be an essential event, supporting scholarships that have allowed dozens of area children to attend summer arts camps as well as arts classes throughout the year. Stay tuned for more details on the upcoming 2016 event!

ABC-Med-Blog-640w

Ed Clark: Gettysburg is an “Arts Destination”

Posted on: April 7th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks
Ed W Clark GETT - March 2014

Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site. Photo Courtesy: Gettysburg National Military Park

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series is leading up to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28: Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Today’s article is the first in this community-based series, featuring Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site.

The Adams County Arts Council’s mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. We believe the arts have the ability to transform lives, to touch everyone’s daily life. As a community leader, what role do the arts play in your daily life?

Clark:  New and expanded arts programming is helping us find ways to connect with new audiences in our communities and across the country.  Our vision at Gettysburg and Eisenhower national parks is to provide memorable experiences for our visitors so that when they leave, they tell others to come here, and tell their sons and daughters how important these places are.  We can’t preserve these parks for future generations all on our own.

Artwork, in the form of sculptures and monuments, surround you at Gettysburg National Military Park. Do you have a particular sculpture or sculptures that you find especially inspiring? Share any stories or personal insights you’d like.

Clark:  While I don’t have a favorite monument, I do have one that stands out for me as a transformational moment, and a memory I’ll always have.  I can remember standing in tall grass near the Virginia Monument, staring out past the Emmitsburg Road, listening to my father wondering aloud about General Lee’s fateful decision to launch the frontal assault of July 3, 1863. I was transformed.  Through the fences and expansive fields, I could picture what my ancestors must have seen at the copse of trees.  As I crossed that field, I was walking in their footsteps.  That’s a moment for me, rooted right at the base of a Gettysburg monument, helping to form a deep appreciation of history and its modern connections and importance.

I understand Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site have a number of upcoming art-related events such as the Artists-In-Residence program, and the June 2016 opening of the temporary exhibit, “With Brush, Mold, Chisel, and Pen: Reflections on Civil War Art.” Why is it important to integrate art with your programming?

Clark:  We’ve joined more than 50 Artists-in-Residence programs in national parks across the country.  By focusing on arts programs we can find new expressions of the park experience and find fresh perspectives that showcase the meaning of the parks.

Throughout 2016, the Centennial year for the National Park Service, we’re creating events and programs that engage with and create the next generation of visitors, supporters, and advocates.  Our exhibit, “With Brush, Mold, Chisel, and Pen: Reflections on Civil War Art,” opening June 29, is a big part of the effort, as is our First Friday events at the Train Station and the popular “Presidential Paint and Wine Night” programs at the Eisenhower site.

Sketch book by Ted Walsh / Photo Courtesy: Gettysburg National Military Park

Sketch book by Ted Walsh / Photo Courtesy: Gettysburg National Military Park

The Arts Council is holding an online fundraiser this April, to support a scholarship fund to help Adams County children attend summer arts camps. What role do you feel arts education plays in children’s development?

Clark:  Our parks are a great place to come to learn about history of course, but you can also learn lessons in communication and arts (Gettysburg Address and monument dedication speeches, for example); about character education (leadership, citizenship, courage etc.); and about science and nature (geology at Devil’s Den, engineering etc.).

At Gettysburg, the arts are all around us through the monuments, as well as the paintings and photographs and poems that the landscape and its history has inspired.

As far as its role in children’s development, art is about connecting on an emotional level, expression and creativity.  The monuments express all kinds of sentiments that the veterans wanted future generations to remember.  Children learn how to create and express through art, and also how to see and interpret the art of others, thereby improving their critical thinking skills. Art can make difficult, or more complex concepts accessible.

Do you feel that history and art face a similar uphill battle today, trying to remain relevant and alive? 

Clark:  Art is a fundamental way that people connect with the parks.  The lessons of leadership, bravery, conduct, recovery and resilience that can be learned on the battlefield at Gettysburg, in the cemetery, and at the Eisenhower farm are lessons that have value in our lives, from the first grade, right on through.  We’re overflowing with inspiring stories – our challenge is always to continue to work on making the connections to our audiences.  Arts programming helps us make those connections.

Cyclorama painting / Photo courtesy: Bill Dowling

Cyclorama painting / Photo courtesy: Bill Dowling

Feel free to share any additional thoughts on the “power” of the arts…

Clark:  Just as Gettysburg is a civil war destination it is also really an arts destination – with everything we have from the monuments, to the Cyclorama painting, to the incredible works of art in our collection and President Eisenhower’s dedication to art in his later years.

We often talk about Gettysburg as having the “power of place.” I’ve seen that power: people visibly, emotionally moved while looking at the Cyclorama painting, for example.  We’re excited to be using multiple media and techniques to create memorable experiences that visitors will take with them, hopefully transforming them.

We hope you join us online, to transform and enrich the lives of area children, April 26-28, for ABC: 50/50 (Arts Benefit Children). This is the 3rd annual ABC event, which has proven to be a successful event with great community support for which we (and many area families) are extremely thankful. It has also proven to be an essential event, supporting scholarships that have allowed dozens of area children to attend summer arts camps as well as arts classes throughout the year. Stay tuned for more details on the upcoming 2016 event!

ABC-Med-Blog-640w

css.php