Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County PA

It’s HERE! Arts Benefit Children (ABC) 50/50
April 26-28

Posted on: April 25th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

In preparation for our exciting online event, ABC 50/50, we have spent the past few weeks introducing you to prominent members of our community who have one thing in common: they all recognize the importance of creative thinking and aesthetic expression in connecting us to each other in community, which consequently maximizes our quality of life as human beings.

Ed W Clark GETT - March 2014

Ed Clark

In our first article, you met Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site, who explains the importance of using the artistic and aesthetic aspects of our town to teach its rich history to generation after generation. An understanding of history informs our treatment of others, our politics and our plans for the future both as a local community and as a united world. The artistic monuments, books, paintings, plays, and museums are just a few examples of how that history has been shared in Gettysburg with people from all over the world.

Marty Qually

Marty Qually

Next we introduced you to Adams County Commissioner Marty Qually, who creatively thinks of our county as “a canvas, and there are 100,000 people with paintbrushes.” He says, “My job is to help all of them paint this county into something better than it was.” Commissioner Qually reminds us that to do a good job at whatever your career may be, one should find a creative “niche” from which to do it.

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Marc Jalbert

We introduced you to baker and entrepreneur Marc Jalbert, a successful business owner in the Gettysburg area for over 20 years, who began his career with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in painting from the University of Southern Maine. Jalbert’s arts education still informs decisions he makes with his business every day, and we as a community reap the benefits when we visit his beautiful bakery and sample the artisan breads and pastries he offers in service.

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Janet Riggs

In a political climate where liberal arts degrees are often discounted, Gettysburg College President Janet Riggs recently offered her thoughts in an editorial in the Miami Herald: “Politicians are doing a disservice to us all by blasting the liberal arts. Residential liberal arts colleges prepare students not only for professional success, but also for lives of civic impact. Our world needs more people — not fewer — with this kind of preparation.” She goes on to emphasize that an education that focuses on creative thinking in a variety of disciplines produces citizens who “go on to have rich and diverse careers in human services, marketing, business, research, human resources, consulting, and education,” noting that her own liberal arts education and major in psychology eventually landed her a position as the president of a prestigious college.

I wish we could profile 100 more people in this series – We are so blessed to live among a diversely creative group of people in this community, each of whom makes a lasting contribution to the tapestry of our lives. I know I am not alone in my desire to continue improving upon our quality of life while preparing the next generation of creative thinkers and community leaders. We all have an opportunity right now to help make that happen.

Join us April 26 through the 28th and make your donation to the ABC 50/50 campaign.

Why “50/50”?

We are asking for $50 donations over a 50-hour period, from Tuesday April 26 at 8 a.m. through Thursday, April 28 at 8 a.m. It takes three $50 donations to send a child to a summer arts camp. Will you help us send kids to camp and classes this year?

Can’t spare $50? We will be so grateful if you can make a $50 donation (or more) toward this campaign; however, if $50 seems too steep, every $0.50 counts, too. Remember the success of our 2014 campaign? We were able to send 20 kids to camp with your $1 to $10 donations. It all counts, so make your donation today!

How can I help?
It’s as easy as A-B-C:

ABC-LOGO-webA. Visit adamsarts.org/sponsorship on April 26 and make your online donation.

B. Share, email and tweet this information to all of your contacts on social media. Your sharing is essential to the success of this campaign.

C. Be sure to watch (and share) our progress online! How many $50 donations can we receive in 50 hours? We will keep you posted on the sponsorship page and on Facebook and Twitter throughout the event.

This event was made possible by the volunteer efforts of the Adams County Arts Council’s Marketing and Development Committee:
Lisa Cadigan, Chair
Anne Cherry
Carol Cook
Joyce Ettenger
Chris Glatfelter (executive director, ACAC)
Nanette Hatzes
Wendy Heiges
Karen Hendricks
Elle Lamboy
Polly Patrono-Carlson

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Marc Jalbert on How to Be an Entrepreneur:
Major in Art

Posted on: April 22nd, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series leads to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28. Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Marc

Marc Jalbert

Today’s article is features Marc Jalbert, entrepreneur baker and owner of the Gettysburg Baking Company, which is nestled in the corner of Lincoln Square in Gettysburg.

Adams County residents as well as visitors from near and far are familiar with the Gettysburg Baking Company, its baker/owner Marc Jalbert, and the beautiful and delicious artisan breads and pastries the bakery offers. (If you’re not – go visit and buy a seeded twist!) Jalbert has been a successful small-business owner in Adams County for twenty years. During that time, various incarnations of his bakery/café have seen success thanks to high quality products, impeccable customer service, and beautifully designed, well-managed spaces.

How did Marc Jalbert come to be such a successful entrepreneur and fixture in the Gettysburg restaurant scene? Was he a business major? Did he study hotel and restaurant management as an undergraduate? These are answers one may expect from a successful restaurateur, but Jalbert actually began his career with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Southern Maine.

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Marc’s famous seeded twists

After teaching art briefly at a private school following graduation, Jalbert realized he “wanted to do his own thing,” so he started freelancing as a graphic designer. Sitting behind a desk all day soon grew tiresome, so he followed his curiosity to learn how to bake – a job that allowed him to be up and about while working with his hands to create an aesthetic and delicious product. “I naively thought baking would be easier than cooking,” Jalbert confesses. But he also feels that his naiveté kept him in the game to keep learning. He took a few classes at King Arthur Flour in Norwich, Vermont after working as a self-taught baker for about six years, and moved to Gettysburg in 1995 with the intentions of establishing a bakery business and storefront.

How did his fine arts degree prepare him for running a business? “Every challenge that comes up can be thought of as a design problem,” says Jalbert. “Whether it’s marketing and designing logos and communications materials, setting up a space that is an efficient and user-friendly place to work and visit, or managing a staff, an artist is trained to look at the whole as well as its parts and how they fit together.” Jalbert had the additional benefit of being raised in an entrepreneurial environment – his dad owned a barbershop in Maine. An avid reader, he continues to read and learn as new challenges arise, but he says he uses his fine arts major every day.

Marc_bakery“Artists are trained to be mindful and pay attention,” says Jalbert. “As an art student, you are trained to stop and look at things – it’s a more open-ended means of problem solving, which may be more suited to ‘jobs of the future.’ Who ever heard of a webmaster 20 years ago?” Rather than education that strictly trains for a task, Jalbert suggests we consider focusing more on education for creative thinking as jobs that didn’t even exist in the not-so-distant past continue to evolve in our society.

If you visit his shop and pay attention, it’s easy to notice the details of the artist in the space, from the warm and welcoming color scheme, to the use of space; from the accessories carefully chosen to display his wares, to the beautiful details in the shape, texture and color of each loaf and pastry. And don’t forget the taste. Everything is delicious.

Marc_stickybunsAs we kick off our Arts Benefit Children (ABC) 50/50 event on April 26 to raise scholarship funds for children to attend arts camps and classes at the ACAC, remember fellow community members like Marc, whose business contributes so much to the quality of life in Adams County. It is largely thanks to art education that Jalbert is able to contribute so much to our community as a small business owner and entrepreneur. Help us continue to foster new generations of creative thinkers and doers by participating in ABC 50/50. Stay tuned for more news on this exciting event.

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Summer Flashback!

Posted on: April 20th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks

Photos by Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator

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Chefs in the kitchen, Putting It All Together! Summer 2015

April… a transitional month that combines gorgeous sunshine-filled days as well as rain-splashed days, as we take a step closer to summer.

And summer is one of the busiest and happiest times of year at the Arts Education Center thanks to the fun lineup of Summer Arts Camps that enrich the lives of hundreds of area children!

As we gear up for another fabulous summer season, we want to let the community know how much these camps impact children’s (and families’) lives. In just a few days, from April 26-28, we are launching an online event, Arts Benefit Children (ABC): 50/50 to raise money for scholarships that help many area children attend summer arts camps.

Meantime, if you are a parent or grandparent interested in enrolling your children/grandchildren in summer arts camps, feel free to take advantage of a special offer available through May 2, 2016: Buy 2 camps, get the 3rd at ½ off! (Click here for the online schedule.)

Enjoy taking a look back at photos and testimonials from last year’s 2015 Summer Arts Camps season:

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Beautiful sounds & syncopated rhythms are coming from the Gallery thanks to ACAC Youth Choir Camp, Brent Talbot, Director, Matt Carlson, Assistant Director.

 

summer flashback 3

Mask Making campers are learning how to create zentangles! Stanley Gilmore Instructor.

 

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The Art of Mask Making!!! Masks are on their way to completion!! Stanley Gilmore, Instructor

 

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Get Your Dance Groove On campers are striking a pose! Hope Lawrence Instructor

Testimonials, summer 2015:

How was the class registration process? Easy, painless (consistent answer from the majority of families)

What summer projects were favorites?

  • All of them! (consistent answer from many families

The Preschool Ballerina and Bears campers liked:

  • The gummy bear dance
  • Dancing with boys
  • The end of week dance for family
  • Dancing with new friends
  • Savannah enjoyed the dance steps she learned and has been dancing around the house
summer flashback 6

Chef Chris Rinehart has prepared a fantastic menu for the Chef Camp for Foodies campers!

 

summer flashback 7

Wow!! Look what our Sewing is Fun campers made!

 

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Ballerinas & Bears campers are performing for their family & friends for their end of camp week party!

More summer 2015 testimonials:

Can you share any specific comments about the camp your child shared with you?

  • They liked everything
  • Loved coming every day
  • Wished it was longer
  • He learned a lot
  • She was very excited to come everyday and wrote “I had fun with this ‘extrodanary’ teacher!”

What did your child like most about art class?

  • Everything!
  • Creating his own unique mask
  • Learning new recipes and mixing things

100% agreed–Yes, they would recommend the art classes to others!

Summer Arts Camps received an average 4.85 out of 5 rating!

summer flashback 9

Sewing IS fun!!! Linda Fauth, Instructor.

 

summer flashback 10

Castles Castles Castles campers are creating some incredible castles.

 

summer flashback 11

Mr. Jack has prepared a table for 13….potters that is! Dirty Hands Pottery camp… dig in!

 

summer flashback 12

Linda Fauth, Cooks in the Kitchen Instructor, is preparing for today’s menu which will include peach cobbler, personalized pizzas and red bean quesadillas. Yum!

 

summer flashback 13

Fun With Weaving Camp, Joh Ricci Instructor

 

summer flashback 14

Build a House camper with Instructor Erica Woodworth.

 

summer flashback 15

Happy ACAC Guitar Camp students

We hope you join us online, to transform and enrich the lives of area children, April 26-27, for ABC: 50/50 (Arts Benefit Children). This is the 3rd annual ABC event, which has proven to be a successful event with great community support for which we (and many area families) are extremely thankful. It has also proven to be an essential event, supporting scholarships that have allowed dozens of area children to attend summer arts camps as well as arts classes throughout the year. Stay tuned for more details on the upcoming 2016 event!

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Marty Qually: “Find Your Niche”

Posted on: April 14th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

Article by Elle Lamboy and Karen Hendricks

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series is leading up to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28: Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Marty Qually

Today’s article is the second in this community-based series, featuring Marty Qually, who serves as one of 3 Adams County Commissioners.

Politics and the arts rarely mix—especially in the current Presidential campaign climate!

But, that’s what makes Adams County’s only Democratic Commissioner, Marty Qually, unique.

Marty was first elected to the Board of Commissioners in 2011 and is now serving his second term.

According to the county’s website, prior to becoming a County Commissioner, Commissioner Qually was an Adams County Auditor. With his background as Auditor, much of his focus as a Commissioner has been and continues to be promoting projects that are both fiscally responsible and sustainable. Commissioner Qually also serves on a number of boards including the Adams County Economic Development Corporation and regularly attends community meetings focused on quality of life, economic sustainability, and rural concerns throughout the County.

The Commissioner is a “strong advocate for the arts.” While he confesses he, “couldn’t draw a straight line” as a child, he started exploring various art forms after college. When he was introduced to the art of dreamcatchers, he discovered his niche. Crafting his dream catchers and developing his own personal style encouraged Marty to create his own hand-blown glass beads. Through this creative process, he discovered his inner artist and found his first creative outlet as an adult. When asked how others can find their creative outlet he suggests, “Try lots of different creative things until you find your own niche.”

As Commissioner Qually’s experience shows, art doesn’t always come naturally but it’s important to keep exploring until you discover the area of art that clicks with you personally. Commissioner Qually didn’t start out in the arts field, but through exploring several art forms, he found something that allowed him to create beautiful things and express his creativity. As the Commissioner observes, “art adds beauty to our world and we all need a little beauty in our lives.”

The summer camps and classes at the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) are the perfect launching pad for “finding your niche” as an artist. Many of the individuals at the camps are trying an art form for the first time; and all of the instructors embrace both novice and expert arts alike. With over 30 camps and classes at affordable price points, taking a summer class often ignites the inspiration to unlock one’s inner artist. From cooking classes and wine tastings, to writing workshops and computer lessons, to pottery and painting, the ACAC has something for all ages and levels of interest.

Commissioner Qually is a huge supporter of the camps and saw a creative awakening in his son through the camp experience. His son, “attended several pottery camps at ACAC and realized he has a gift and passion for sculpting.” The best part about his son’s experience, Qually continues, is that his son “learned to be creative for its own rewards and not for others’ approval. His artwork is an outlet for him.”

Above all, Commissioner Qually feels his affinity for the arts has helped him be a more creative diplomat, sharing, “As a public servant, I think of the county as a canvas and there are 100,000 people with paintbrushes. My job is to help all of them paint this county into something better than it was.”

We hope you join us online, to transform and enrich the lives of area children, April 26-28, for ABC: 50/50 (Arts Benefit Children). This is the 3rd annual ABC event, which has proven to be a successful event with great community support for which we (and many area families) are extremely thankful. It has also proven to be an essential event, supporting scholarships that have allowed dozens of area children to attend summer arts camps as well as arts classes throughout the year. Stay tuned for more details on the upcoming 2016 event!

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Ed Clark: Gettysburg is an “Arts Destination”

Posted on: April 7th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks
Ed W Clark GETT - March 2014

Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site. Photo Courtesy: Gettysburg National Military Park

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series is leading up to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28: Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Today’s article is the first in this community-based series, featuring Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site.

The Adams County Arts Council’s mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. We believe the arts have the ability to transform lives, to touch everyone’s daily life. As a community leader, what role do the arts play in your daily life?

Clark:  New and expanded arts programming is helping us find ways to connect with new audiences in our communities and across the country.  Our vision at Gettysburg and Eisenhower national parks is to provide memorable experiences for our visitors so that when they leave, they tell others to come here, and tell their sons and daughters how important these places are.  We can’t preserve these parks for future generations all on our own.

Artwork, in the form of sculptures and monuments, surround you at Gettysburg National Military Park. Do you have a particular sculpture or sculptures that you find especially inspiring? Share any stories or personal insights you’d like.

Clark:  While I don’t have a favorite monument, I do have one that stands out for me as a transformational moment, and a memory I’ll always have.  I can remember standing in tall grass near the Virginia Monument, staring out past the Emmitsburg Road, listening to my father wondering aloud about General Lee’s fateful decision to launch the frontal assault of July 3, 1863. I was transformed.  Through the fences and expansive fields, I could picture what my ancestors must have seen at the copse of trees.  As I crossed that field, I was walking in their footsteps.  That’s a moment for me, rooted right at the base of a Gettysburg monument, helping to form a deep appreciation of history and its modern connections and importance.

I understand Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site have a number of upcoming art-related events such as the Artists-In-Residence program, and the June 2016 opening of the temporary exhibit, “With Brush, Mold, Chisel, and Pen: Reflections on Civil War Art.” Why is it important to integrate art with your programming?

Clark:  We’ve joined more than 50 Artists-in-Residence programs in national parks across the country.  By focusing on arts programs we can find new expressions of the park experience and find fresh perspectives that showcase the meaning of the parks.

Throughout 2016, the Centennial year for the National Park Service, we’re creating events and programs that engage with and create the next generation of visitors, supporters, and advocates.  Our exhibit, “With Brush, Mold, Chisel, and Pen: Reflections on Civil War Art,” opening June 29, is a big part of the effort, as is our First Friday events at the Train Station and the popular “Presidential Paint and Wine Night” programs at the Eisenhower site.

Sketch book by Ted Walsh / Photo Courtesy: Gettysburg National Military Park

Sketch book by Ted Walsh / Photo Courtesy: Gettysburg National Military Park

The Arts Council is holding an online fundraiser this April, to support a scholarship fund to help Adams County children attend summer arts camps. What role do you feel arts education plays in children’s development?

Clark:  Our parks are a great place to come to learn about history of course, but you can also learn lessons in communication and arts (Gettysburg Address and monument dedication speeches, for example); about character education (leadership, citizenship, courage etc.); and about science and nature (geology at Devil’s Den, engineering etc.).

At Gettysburg, the arts are all around us through the monuments, as well as the paintings and photographs and poems that the landscape and its history has inspired.

As far as its role in children’s development, art is about connecting on an emotional level, expression and creativity.  The monuments express all kinds of sentiments that the veterans wanted future generations to remember.  Children learn how to create and express through art, and also how to see and interpret the art of others, thereby improving their critical thinking skills. Art can make difficult, or more complex concepts accessible.

Do you feel that history and art face a similar uphill battle today, trying to remain relevant and alive? 

Clark:  Art is a fundamental way that people connect with the parks.  The lessons of leadership, bravery, conduct, recovery and resilience that can be learned on the battlefield at Gettysburg, in the cemetery, and at the Eisenhower farm are lessons that have value in our lives, from the first grade, right on through.  We’re overflowing with inspiring stories – our challenge is always to continue to work on making the connections to our audiences.  Arts programming helps us make those connections.

Cyclorama painting / Photo courtesy: Bill Dowling

Cyclorama painting / Photo courtesy: Bill Dowling

Feel free to share any additional thoughts on the “power” of the arts…

Clark:  Just as Gettysburg is a civil war destination it is also really an arts destination – with everything we have from the monuments, to the Cyclorama painting, to the incredible works of art in our collection and President Eisenhower’s dedication to art in his later years.

We often talk about Gettysburg as having the “power of place.” I’ve seen that power: people visibly, emotionally moved while looking at the Cyclorama painting, for example.  We’re excited to be using multiple media and techniques to create memorable experiences that visitors will take with them, hopefully transforming them.

We hope you join us online, to transform and enrich the lives of area children, April 26-28, for ABC: 50/50 (Arts Benefit Children). This is the 3rd annual ABC event, which has proven to be a successful event with great community support for which we (and many area families) are extremely thankful. It has also proven to be an essential event, supporting scholarships that have allowed dozens of area children to attend summer arts camps as well as arts classes throughout the year. Stay tuned for more details on the upcoming 2016 event!

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A Wintry Warm Farm-to-Table Supper with Chef Josh Fidler

Posted on: February 5th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

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According to the groundhog, spring is not so far away. On Sunday, February 28, Chef Josh Fidler of Fidler & Co. Craft Kitchen and Grocery also invites us to brave our shadows and come out for an evening of upscale rustic cuisine. The event will include a four-course meal of wintry comfort foods, beginning with an amuse-bouche (appetizer), followed by a warm Brussels sprout salad, Josh’s signature “Pork & Grits,” which uses pork from local Rettland Farm, and crème brûlée for dessert. This cozy supper will also feature local cheeses, dairy and eggs, and a few surprises.

“I love doing these dinners,” says Josh. “Interacting in an intimate dinner situation is amazing, and I love raising awareness of the great variety of local products that are available in our area.” Josh is excited to offer this particular dinner to support the Adams County Arts Council. “The arts have always been a huge part of my life, and I think it’s of the utmost importance to promote creativity.” Josh’s creativity is certainly apparent in the beautiful presentation of his dishes, as well as with the combination of ingredients he uses to produce such delicious meals.

Why local farms?

pork pastrami rettland farm

Pork pastrami from Rettland Farm

Josh feels it’s important to build long-standing and trusting relationships with one’s purveyors. He has been working with Beau Ramsburg at Rettland Farm (located right here in  Gettysburg) for the past four years. They share a strong working and personal relationship based on a mutual admiration of and commitment to responsible husbandry. All of Rettland Farm’s animals are pastured and free-range, and the farm does not use antibiotics. Ramsburg rotates his grazing plots so the land and vegetation can sustain itself, and he supplements the feed with non-GMO soybeans. “Beau does things the right way even though it’s not the easy way,” says Josh. All of Josh’s pork and chicken dinners served at Fidler & Co. feature meats from Rettland Farm. You learn more about Fidler & Co., including additional information about the local purveyors of their ingredients here.

Pomona's Trio Bret Crawford, saxophone; Lisa Cadigan, vocals; Marc Jalbert, guitar

Pomona’s Trio
Bret Crawford, saxophone; Lisa Cadigan, vocals; Marc Jalbert, guitar

For an additional dose of cozy atmosphere, this evening will also feature live music by local jazz group, Pomona’s Trio. Marc Jalbert (guitar), Bret Crawford (saxophone), and Lisa Cadigan (vocals) have been playing a combination of original tunes, jazz standards, and creative arrangements of popular music on Thursday nights at Fidler & Co. (formerly Pomona’s Bakery Café) since 2011. All three musicians cherish the time they spend together making music, so they jumped at the opportunity to support the ACAC with an evening of jazz alongside their friend and regular Thursday-night host, Josh Fidler. The group is very excited to have recently produced their first CD, which will be on sale at the event. You can also purchase it at Fidler & Co., the Gettysburg Baking Co. downtown, or online.

For more information or to make your reservation over the phone,
call (717) 334-5006.

You can also register online:  Mark your calendars and make your reservation for this event today!

Sunday, February 28 from 6 – 8 pm

Adams County Arts Council

125 S. Washington Street

Gettysburg, PA 17325

$80 members/$90 non-members

NYE: Gettysburg Style

Posted on: December 28th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

12363048_10153359222182449_6479196797616507991_o“Spirits are high and everyone is hopeful”

This is an excerpt from an article published in Celebrate Gettysburg magazine, Nov/Dec 2015:

The grand finale to Gettysburg’s holiday season attracts about 2,000 people to Lincoln Square on New Year’s Eve. Organizer Chris Glatfelter, Executive Director of the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC), says the key to Gettysburg’s New Year’s Eve Celebration is its universal appeal to people of all ages and the community partnerships it produces. Gettysburg Borough, ACNB Bank, and the Majestic Theatre are just some of the collaborators.

The ACAC is mainly responsible for entertainment, including a DJ on the square starting at 9 pm, followed by a live music stage from 9:30-11:30, free arts activities at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center, a free family movie at the Majestic, performances and entertainment at Christ Lutheran Church, then a countdown to midnight program led by Major William Troxell at 11:30, culminating in fireworks lighting the midnight sky above Lincoln Square, sponsored by ACNB Bank.

“The ACAC is involved because of the arts… When you can add an arts element to a program or event, you make it better,” Glatfelter explains. “The music adds to the downtown atmosphere, a balloon artist fascinates the kids… It’s important for us to be in the public eye stressing the value of the arts.”

“The thing with New Year’s Eve that always strikes me,” Glatfelter continues, “I’ve seen close to 2,000 people of all ages, enjoying themselves, dancing, shivering together… but spirits are high and everyone is hopeful for a new year and what will come.”

Click here for a full listing of NYE events

Click here for the full Celebrate Gettysburg magazine article, The Heart of the Holidays

The Heart of the Holidays

 

6th Annual Gingerbread Celebration & Holiday Mart—Something for Everyone!

Posted on: December 2nd, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

by Elle Lamboy

2011 Gingerbread Winner IMG_5041

Nothing says “holiday” like gingerbread, shopping, Santa Claus, ugly sweaters and a little friendly competition!

The Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) is excited to present the 6th Annual Gingerbread Celebration & Holiday Mart on December 4-December 5. Chris Glatfelter, ACAC Executive Director states, “We’re pleased to invite the community, free of charge, to enjoy the houses, Holiday Mart and all the other activities we’re offering. It’s a great way to welcome in the holiday season and to support arts education in the county.”

The event takes place at HACC’s Gettysburg Campus, located at 731 Old Harrisburg Road, and runs Friday from Noon to 7:00 p.m. and Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. A First Friday reception will begin at 5:30 with complimentary light refreshments. An auction of some of the handmade gingerbread creations will also occur during the reception.

A silent auction, holiday mart, gingerbread voting, and food from Z&D Fries will be available. Kitchen Craft, the presenting co-sponsor, will be giving cooking demonstrations using its cookware on Friday at 12:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. and Saturday at 9:30 a.m.,11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. If you attend the celebration on Friday by 5:15 p.m.; be sure to wear your ugliest holiday sweater! One lucky sweater will win a $100 Gift Card from Scott and Company Fine Jewelers.

The Holiday Mart is the ideal place to pick up a unique gift for the person on your list who has everything. This will replace the traditional Holiday Mart normally held at the ACAC. Vendors include, Kids Knitz (childrens hand knitted sweaters and accessories), Wendy Heiges Jewelry, Textures by Westmoreland, Parfections Chocolates, Sanders Crafts (jewelry, bead crafts), Bobbie Becker Gallery and Foxxy Moxxy, Sandra Marshall (homemade soaps, lotions and more), Gettysburg Watercolors by Tom Rooney, Sarajevo Phoenix Fair Trade Project (handcrafted items made by Bosnian War Widows), Erin Brown (postcards, paintings and magnets, Levato Shaw (door swags, wreaths and more.)

There is also a ton of fun for the kids! The YWCA Gettysburg & Adams County will present “Holiday Stories from Around the World” in the Fireplace Room from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Friday, only. Children of all ages are invited to learn how childreIMG_4854lowresn around the world celebrate Christmas as well as other holidays throughout the year. See pictures of holiday clothing, food, and traditions practiced all over the world. Stories will be presented every 15 minutes.

“Just Kids” at Gettysburg Dental Associates is excited to once again sponsor the children’s activities at the Gingerbread Celebration. Join “Just Kids” on Friday and Saturday at their craft station and make a fun winter or Christmas themed fingerprint bookmark.

Children ages 9 and up can enjoy a special opportunity to make their own wooden pen or pencil under the direction of the Cumberland Valley Woodworkers on Friday and Saturday while supplies last. A minimum $5 donation to the ACAC is recommended.

Santa Claus will visit on Saturday only from noon until 1:30 p.m.

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Jewelry to Spark A Memorial Scholarship Fund

Posted on: November 12th, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

By Caroline Johnson

Wendy Heiges Jewelry Show Fund Raiser

An Event to Benefit the New
Noreen Neitz ACAC Scholarship Fund for Young Adults

Thursday, November 19, 4:30-7:00 pm, ACAC Arts Education Center

Sparkling stars dust tail

“Creativity is a spark… it can be intensely satisfying when the flame catches and a new idea sweeps around the world.” –Jonah Lehrer

Isn’t this true? How satisfying does it feel to receive recognition for initiating a new idea? I think that this feeling could be applicable to many triumphs in life where inspiration is a driving force. In this case, a very special someone has motivated the Adams County Arts Council to create a scholarship fund that will enable young adults to enrich their lives through arts education.

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Noreen Neitz

There is no better way to establish this opportunity than by naming the fund in honor of the ever inspiring, Noreen Neitz. Noreen passed away in 2013 after a long battle with breast cancer. She lived a full, engaging, and faithful life in which she made a significant impact on those who were fortunate enough to know her. She was an advocate for the arts but most importantly, a staunch advocate for youth in the community.

I had the opportunity to speak with her dear friend Caryl Schmitz who is helping to coordinate this scholarship. Caryl spoke of Noreen’s presence of leadership in the community, her encouraging and caring nature, and her tenacity to seek out new opportunities in which to learn and gain new experiences. This last characteristic in particular provides an example of what an individual might expect to gain from an education at the Arts Council. This scholarship will be specifically geared toward young adults in the community who wish to take classes at the Arts Council but are not able to due to financial limitations.

Considering Noreen’s history of involvement with youth in the community, it is safe to assume that she would be fully supportive of this scholarship. It will provide a new and enriching educational experience for young adults in the community, a chance of which she might have taken advantage herself!

Wendy Heiges, Program Coordinator at the ACAC and freelance jewelry designer, felt supported and touched by Noreen’s vivacious and thoughtful spirit. Noreen seemingly loved Wendy’s jewelry, and could be seen more often than not sporting a pair of her hand-designed earrings! Caryl mentions that Noreen enjoyed expressing herself creatively and typically couldn’t resist indulging in pair of “fun” earrings!

For her love of creativity, education, and beautifully made jewelry, Wendy’s Jewelry Show Fundraiser is the perfect event to help raise awareness for this scholarship.

You will be sure to find something that is perfect for the special people in your life. Wendy’s hand IMG_8068designed jewelry will be on display offering an exciting variety of collections from which to choose. This display will include a limited edition pink quartz earring in honor of Noreen Neitz.

All proceeds will benefit the Noreen Neitz ACAC Scholarship Fund for Young Adults.

Stop by and shop for a great cause!

 

 

It’s A Rock Star Masquerade!

Posted on: October 22nd, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

by Elle Lamboy

You’re Invited to the Annual Masquerade Party

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October 23, 2015

8:00p.m. to midnight

Gettysburg Hotel

 

 

One of my favorite Broadway songs is “Masquerade” from the Phantom of the Opera: “Masquerade! Paper faces on parade . . .Masquerade! Hide your face, so the world will never find you!”

There’s a special kind of intrigue and excitement that comes with a masquerade party, which is why the Adams County Art Council’s (ACAC) Annual Masquerade Party is the best ticket in town this fall. Where else can you be dressed in your costumed best, enjoy great food, sip fabulous drinks, bid in a brilliant silent auction, and partake in a friendly competitive karaoke jam or two?

Never been to the Party? No problem! I interviewed Chris Glatfelter, Executive Director of the ACAC, for the inside scoop on this must-attend event of the season:

EL: How did you curate this year’s Masquerade Party Theme, “Rock Star?”

CG: The Masquerade Party committee wanted a theme that everyone could have fun with—and I think they found the right one!

EL: How many years has the ACAC hosted the Party?

CG: 15 years

EL: What can people expect from this year’s Party?

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Colgan Hirsh Band with the Slammin’ Horns

CG: Guests can dance the night away with crowd favorite Colgan Hirsh Band with the Slammin’ Horns. We will also hold the ever popular Costume Contest Conga Line with cash prizes and a fabulous silent auction. New this year is a Karaoke Contest….you can’t have rock stars without a little singing, right?

You can still purchase a ticket for this rockin’ event – just call 717-334-5006!

Something news-worthy always occurs at the Party, so you won’t want to miss it! Last year, a man proposed to his girlfriend (who happened to be wearing a real pumpkin on her head) right on the dancefloor! They have reserved their table again for this year.

IMG_1867Come join us and see the fun you can have when you dress as your favorite rock star and “leave the world behind you” for the night!

 

Can’t make it this Friday?  ACAC always welcomes donations and support from the community in many ways.

 

Fifth Annual Art at the Winery

Posted on: September 15th, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

by Polly Patrono-Carlson

wine-bottle-sizes-4If you go back to the Greeks and Romans, they talk about all three – wine, food, and art – as a way of enhancing life.

~Robert Mondavi

On September 20, Hauser Estate Winery will host the 5th annual Art at the Winery, a large outdoor art show featuring art, music, demonstrations and wine. Every year, members of the Adams County Arts Council come up the hill to present their works of art in this tranquil and beautiful setting.  The event is free and open to the public, and includes live music and demonstrations.  Art, great food, and wine can be purchased.

Gloria Saloky will be demonstrating Belly Dancing from 1:30-2:00 p.m. and Erica Woodworth will be doing a wheel throwing demonstration from 3:30-4:00 p.m.

Along with paintings and pottery, there will be Plein Art Artist painting the fabulous Hauser Estate scenery.Hauser Arts & Vinyards2 005

Wander around, gaze, sip, and listen to music by Ron Nicodemus from 2-3:30. There may be a priceless work of art waiting for you to take home and enhance your life!

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List of artists presenting at Art at the Winery:

Sally Becker – painting, pottery and mixed media

Carrie Dietrich – artist

Moises Martinez – oil paintings

Peter Plant – plein air paintings

Erica Woodworth – pottery

Lori Nelson – pottery

Marianne Kingston – crocheted jewelry

Wendy Heiges – handmade jewelry

Anne Finucane – etchings and pastels

Laurie McKelvie – pastels

Debbie Westmoreland – fiberwork

Arts Council table

Bert Danielson – photography

Larry Brogan – photography

Ciji Lo’Ren – leather purses

Dave Laskowski – black and white photography

Caroline Laskowski   fiber artist, beaded bags

Food by Sherry Freeman at Ragged Edge.

 

From Summer to Fall …

Posted on: September 1st, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

There’s been a crispness to the mornings recently, signaling the transition from summer to fall. Fall is my favorite time of year. I often bound forward into the autumn without looking back. However, this year seems a bit harder — How do you leave behind such a wonderful summer? ACAC Education Coordinator Wendy Heiges orchestrated a phenomenal summer of creative camps for our community. With all of the offerings, ACAC received glowing evaluations and cheers for wonderful teachers and projects. We’re so grateful for the treasures created and shared with the ACAC by our community of teachers and students. ACAC hosted 35 camps this summer for students ranging in ages from 3 to 15. Offerings included work with clay, paint, textiles, performing arts and culinary arts.

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The pace in the halls of the Education Center will change with the seasons, of course. The mornings might be a bit quieter with children in school rather than cooking in our kitchen and dancing in the studio, but there’s plenty in store at ACAC for the fall, too. If your kids are back at school and you have some free time during the day, or if you need a break in the evening, you may want to check out a painting class. Can’t commit to a class over several weeks? Drop in for yoga on a Friday morning, join us for a paint and wine night, or register for the upcoming culinary event featuring Food 101’s Chef, Jennifer Williams, the local produce of 5 Points Market, RelishThis, Wine pairings by Caryl Schmitz and dessert by Beeman’s Bakery. This farm-to-table class and celebration, scheduled for October 8 from 6-8 p.m., is sure to be a deliciously fun evening, and it’s just one of many special events ACAC has planned for the fall.  Call 334-5006 or keep checking the web site for more information.

And of course, the halls will be bustling after 3 pm with plenty of after-school opportunities for our younger students. There’s never a shortage of creative activities to engage the kids after school. Click here for a list of after-school offerings.

As we transition from summer to fall, we thank you for your support and participation in the community treasure that is the Adams County Arts Council.

Onward!

Beautiful Blooms: For One Day Only

Posted on: June 10th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks
Charlie Gomer's garden, Gettysburg Daylilies (Photo Credit: Casey Martin)

Charlie Gomer’s garden, Gettysburg Daylilies (Photo Credit: Casey Martin)

One thousand is a conservative estimate of the number of daylilies that will be blooming on Saturday, June 27 when Anne and Charlie Gomer of Gettysburg host “Brunch at Gettysburg Daylilies,” a new fundraiser event to benefit the nonprofit Adams County Arts Council (ACAC).

“On any given day in summer, from the end of June to the second week in August, there are thousands of daylilies in bloom,” Gomer explains. “There are close to 2,000 different cultivars, or different plants, about 1,000 that I have purchased and another 1,500 of my own that I have crossed. So yes it’s safe to say we’ll have at least a thousand blooms here on June 27.”

Gomer, an ACAC board member, will welcome attendees, along with his wife Anne, from 10 am – 1 pm on June 27 to enjoy a delicious outdoor brunch—along with a feast for the eyes, as guest gaze upon daylilies of every color imaginable.

Your invitation to Gettysburg's most colorful brunch ever!

Your invitation to Gettysburg’s most colorful brunch ever!

“There isn’t a species of another flower that varies as much as the daylily,” according to Gomer, who is a Master Gardener, having undergone the rigorous training and community service required by the Penn State Extension Service’s program. “I have daylilies that range in size from 13 inches all the way down to the miniature varieties under three and a half inches.”

You could say it’s a hobby that has “taken root” in a big way. Gomer, who retired in 2006 as a high school technology and business teacher, says he was seeking a “meaningful purpose in life in terms of community service” after spending 35 years teaching accounting, computer applications, business law, business math and other related subjects.

One of Gomer's favorite daylilies (Photo courtesy Charlie Gomer)

One of Gomer’s favorite daylilies (Photo courtesy Charlie Gomer)

He says becoming a Master Gardener appealed to him because it was a way of taking care of our earth, plus it provided a brand new outlet and interest. Gomer’s initial goal was to “maintain the yard and keep things healthy” but it quickly blossomed into a specific area of gardening.

A guest speaker, Diane Kendig of York, came to talk to the Master Gardener about daylilies, and Gomer was intrigued. “I stopped by her place (Perfect Perennials) and I had never seen so many daylilies in my life.”

Another of Gomer's favorites (Photo courtesy Charlie Gomer)

Another of Gomer’s favorites (Photo courtesy Charlie Gomer)

“Up until that point, daylilies were like a filler plant to me, but when I saw all those daylilies… I realized they were more than orange, red and yellow… and I knew I wanted some.”

That was 2008, and after establishing his garden, adding at least 100 cultivars a year, Gomer says his interest and garden have both likely hit their peak.

When asked if he has a favorite variety, it’s hard for Gomer to choose one specific variety. “I like the kind that have complex patterns, and I also like the ruffles or edges on a daylily. With the complex patterns, the petal is one color, with the eye being a different complimentary color, and then the edge of lily will pick up same color as eye and throat.”

“So some of my favorite daylilies have a greenish- yellowish throat with purple or blue petals…  I like all the blues but they are hard to grow–not as hardy,” Gomer says.

Guests on June 27 will not only enjoy seeing rows upon rows of daylilies in bloom, but Gomer promises another surprise is in store.

“Most people will see a peacock that they’ve never seen before,” Gomer claims. In addition to the standard India blue variety, the Gomers currently own five other varieties—chocolate bronze color peacocks, plus a Cameo or taupe variety, peach, purple, white and midnight which is a dark teal color.

Photo Credit: Casey Martin

Photo Credit: Casey Martin

Gomer says he looks forward to sharing the joy and beauty of his property with attendees on June 27—just one day that can be thought of a snapshot in time, as his garden continues to develop and evolve through this summer and the summers to come.

“The name daylily comes from the Greek word Hemerocallis which means ‘beauty for a day,’” he explains. Each bud opens for only one day, although the scapes (or stems) can produce up to 30 buds, so that one clump can continue blooming for several weeks. He is hopeful that June 27 will bring a fantastic variety of blooms.

“The Arts Council is certainly an asset to the community. As a board member I try to think and help wherever I can—I try to bring a different viewpoint, from a business perspective… I’m not an artist,” Gomer says.

Many people would probably disagree… It’s just that Gomer “paints” his landscapes, not with oil or watercolor paints, but with a colorful palette of daylilies.

 

Credit: Casey Martin for Celebrate Gettysburg magazine

Credit: Casey Martin for Celebrate Gettysburg magazine

Brunch at Gettysburg Daylilies:

Saturday, June 27 from 10 am – 1 pm

Location: 45 Sachs Road, Gettysburg

Details: $30 per person with reservations requested by June 24

Click here to secure your reservations today! Or call the ACAC at 717-334-5006

Bonus: Take a daylily (or two) home with you! Gomer has potted many varieties for guests to select from and take home to their own gardens. Partial proceeds benefit the ACAC!

Rain date: June 28

Credit: Casey Martin

Credit: Casey Martin

 

A few more fascinating facts from Charlie Gomer:

Recent daylilies added to the garden have come from CA, TX, FL, GA and NY – “I enjoy accumulating them from different sources to make garden interesting,” Gomer says.

Time spent in the garden:

  • 25 hours a week every April, for mulching and preparing the beds for the upcoming season
  • More than 25 hours a week in May, when weeding is added to the gardening chores. Gomer is quick to add that gardening is not a solo pursuit. “Anne is right there alongside of me—we spend a lot of time together in the garden.”
  • 2 hours daily, during the rest of the summer through August

Amount of mulch required by the gardens every year: 20 yards

Societies to which the Gomers belong:

To learn more and see more gorgeous images, click here for a recent Celebrate Gettysburg magazine article featuring Gomer’s gardens.

Prize-winning lilies: Gomer secured two awards at the 2014 Free State Daylily Society Show, Baltimore, MD... with these beautiful blooms.

Prize-winning lilies: Gomer secured two awards at the 2014 Free State Daylily Society Show, Baltimore, MD… with these beautiful blooms.

 

Photo courtesy Charlie Gomer

Photo courtesy Charlie Gomer

Artist Spotlight: Margery Benson

Posted on: June 1st, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

By Elle Lamboy

Margery Benson

Margery Benson

Since childhood, I’ve always been a bit intimidated by artists. Perhaps it’s because I am so humbled by the incredible imagery they produce.

Or, maybe it’s because I’m a bit envious that artists can visually express their vision while I can barely draw a stick figure.

So, when I was asked by the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) to interview artist Margery Benson, I was nervous.

As I entered her studio, located on the second floor of the ACAC facility, I was immediately awe-struck.

Her introspective paintings filled the studio from corner to corner; bordering the space with an abundance of canvas, color, and authentic imagery. Margery stood in the middle of it all with her palette in hand and her smock beautifully colored with various remnants of her latest work in progress.

We exchanged pleasantries and then she asked the question I dreaded.

“Are you an artist?” she inquired.

“No, I mumbled with a bit of uneasiness, “I’m just a writer.”

“Oh, so you’re an artist of words.” she immediately replied.

My entire spirit lifted. In just five words, within five minutes of meeting me, she changed my whole perspective.

And her art did the same.

As I scanned the room, I was immediately captivated by a striking painting of urban decay. While most would see the urban landscape as the antithesis of beauty she found it incredibly inspiring. “There’s just something beautiful about it,” she said looking longingly at the piece, “I know others may not see it, but I do.”

Urban Decay by Margery Benson

Urban Decay by Margery Benson

As we walked around the studio viewing her various works, she knew something intimate about each of her subjects. One was a blind musician, another a struggling artist herself, one who I swore resembled Walt Whitman. “See?, she asked confidently,  you see the literary in him. Everyone has their own perception…that’s what art is supposed to do!”

Her portrayal of these people left me with a desire to imagine my own end to their stories—her art invoked an immediate sense of curiosity and engagement that left me longing to spend some quality time with her work.

I quickly grasped that her keen perception is one of her strongest artistic qualities. She takes the time to get to know what or who she’s painting, and it shows. She doesn’t just see it, she feels it.

“Perception, concept, and context are essential components in my work, Margery explains, “the medium is secondary, or even tertiary, to the final product. Actually the final product is rarely final as I might be doing another final brushstroke after a work is framed.”

In order to put her astute perception to practice, she rents a studio at the ACAC, along with four other artists.

She especially enjoys the balance of socialization and solidarity the ACAC studio space provides stating, “The other residents are a fascinating group of artists. We periodically meet and visit, but [my] focus is to try to get works to a suitable stage for sharing with other audiences.”

Benson also shares that she enjoys being in a “state-of-the-art facility with all necessary utilities and helpful staff to accommodate any requests.”  She also favors the downtown location of the ACAC, which “facilitates interaction with the local community.”

“In fact, she exclaims as her eyes light up, “when we’re lucky, the young children taking cooking classes downstairs will come up and share their culinary masterpieces with us. The smells are just amazing!”

As I go to leave, she takes the time to introduce me to her “studio neighbor” photographic artist Bert Danielson. Their interaction is comfortable yet respectful, like two officemates relishing in a quick coffee break between deadlines.

I paused for a moment on the steps to scratch a few notes and reflect a bit on my recent encounter. I channeled Margery’s inspiring perspective as I imagined the five artists sharing creative ideals and then going back to their solitary studios to create their own original works as the classrooms below buzzed with activity of young artists hoping, one day, to have a studio of their own to fill.

Margery looks forward to attending several group shows this year to share her work with the public. You can also view her work, first hand, by E-mailing her at margerybenson@aol.com.

For more information about renting studio space at the ACAC, contact Chris Glatfelter, Executive Director, at ed@adamsarts.org.

Untitled by Margery Benson

Untitled by Margery Benson

 

What’s New this Summer? Castles, Doodles, Dinosaurs and more!

Posted on: May 29th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

Nearly 40 summer camps are “ready to roll” at the ACAC this summer! Wendy Heiges, Program Director at the ACAC, says the process of putting together children’s camps never ceases to amaze her.

“Every year the instructors propose even more imaginative, creative classes than the year before,” she explains. “This summer’s lineup includes many tried and true classic camps, but also many fantastic, new camps that draw on the incredible talents that our Adams County art teachers and artists will share with children of all ages.”

NEW summer camps for 2015 include:

fishSwim with the Fish! June 15-19 (ages 11-14), 1-4 pm  Paper Mache, that is!  Starting with a balloon, create a form out of paper mache that becomes your favorite whimsical or realistic fish. Throw your own style into this interesting project-there is no right or wrong!  Paint and embellish for pizzazz! Erica Woodworth $145 (member $135) Register

3D Architectural & Figurative Sculpture, June 22-26 (ages 11-14), 10-1 pm  Study & apply the architectural &sculptural work of Alberto Giacometti, Deborah Butterfield and Frank Gehr, to your own designs as you sculpt a human or animal figure and its habitat. Using basic sculptural techniques, create your 3D forms usingwire, plaster, paper mache& natural materials. Sally Becker$155 (member $145) Register

castleCastles, Castles, Castles, July 6-10 (ages 8-11), 1-4 pm  If you think castles are cool, join us for a week filled with castle exploration and construction.  Learn about the various features of castles and how they were improved during the Middle-Ages.  Build and decorate a castle using a variety of materials and found objects. Dawn Magee$155 (member $145) Register

From Doodle to Masterpiece, July 13th-17th (ages 9-12), 9-12 pm  Doodling is a fun way to create interesting artwork by using lines, patterns and your imagination.  Explore a variety of basic techniques in black and white, and enhance your doodles using colored pencils and markers.  Create a masterpiece by incorporating the doodling techniques learned.Joh Ricci  $155 (member $145) Register

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Postcards from the Edge!  July 13-17 (ages 11-14), 1-4 pm  Create artwork postcards that tell your summer story.  Find your artistic style while learning the traditional format of a postcard-scrapbook style-using mixed media, photography, collage, paint and more.  Discover layering and composition techniques, working with ink resist and making your own collage papers.  Emily Hoponick$155 (member $145) Register

DinosaurDynamic Dinosaurs!July 20-24 (ages 5-7), 1-4 pm  Draw, paint & collage your way through the world of dinosaurs!  Your favorite dinosaurs will come to life as you workwith cool materials like oil pastels & metallic markers. Incorporate elements of design using patterns & textures.  Homemade dinosaur cookies & story time too!  Emily Hoponick$155 (member $145) Register

op artOp Art, July 20-24 (ages 10-12), 1-4 pm  Take a look at Op Art, a 1960s style of art that makes use of optical illusion and you’ll discover the math-based precise composition is designed to trick the eye.Create your own abstract designs, while learning new techniques as you learn about op-art artists and the movement. Kim Robinson $150 (member $140) Register

Pop Art,July 27-31 (ages 8-11), 9-12 pm  Explore the bright imagery of the pop art culture and create fun, vivid art work of objects that are meaningful to you while working with multi-media & various mediums.  Delve into self-portraits and icons of today too!  “Once you got pop, you can never see it the same way again.”  Melissa Jackson $155 (member $145) Register

tee peeThe Art of Native American StorytellingAugust 10-15 (ages 7-10), 1-4 p.m.  Using oil pastels, colored and watercolor pencils, draw and paint your interpretations of the fascinating creation stories and myths of the Native Americans. Become immersed in their vast culture and create artwork that tells your story.  Make traditional fry bread to celebrate! Emily Hoponick $155 (member $145) Register

The Art of Mask Making, August 10-14 (ages 8-11), 9-12 pm  Masks have been used throughout history for theatrical performances, royalty, ceremonies, hunting, portrait masks and more.  Apply layers of paper macheover a mask template to create your own unique cultural mask inspired by history.  Embellishments add to the fun!  Stanley Gilmore$155 (member $145) Register

Intermediate Guitar Workshop: Write Your Own Music, Saturday, August 8, 9-3 pm (13 and up) Have you been playing the guitar for a few years and are a beginning songwriter?  Learn to build your song and incorporate solos into the key you’re playing and writing.  Covers chord theory and scales, and hands-on demos.  Record what you’ve learned! Mark Wesling $150 (member $140)  Register

Chef Camp for Foodies, August 3-5 Intermediate skill level, (9 and up), 9-11 am, 9-11 am, and 9-noon  Do you love to experiment in the kitchen?  Addicted to cooking shows?  If you know the basics and would like to improve your skills and techniques, this is the camp for you.  We’ll play, “what’s in the cabinet,” develop new ways to create culinary successes with some tried and true ingredients, and put it all together for a 3rd day feast. Chris Rinehart, $106 ($102)Register

Build a House Out of Clay! July 13-17 (ages 9-11), 1-4 pm  Have fun with clay as you design and draw and build the house of your dreams!  Lay out the design on clay slab and create your own custom built 3D house.  Develop hand-building, sculpting technique, scale, and proportion skills. 4 days of clay building & 1 day of glazing.   Erica Woodworth $155 (member $145) Register

Check out the full listing of nearly 40 Summer Camps 2015 by clicking here and register your child(ren) today!

Or give a gift certificate to a special child in your life so that he/she can attend a summer camp (call 717-334-5006 to learn more) and please note that camp scholarships are available (click here for info–scroll down to “Children’s Summer Camps”).

 

 

Art and Music: Like PB & J

Posted on: May 20th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

PB&J

Peanut butter and jelly… peas and carrots… best friends like Bert and Ernie, Snoopy and Woodstock… Rock and roll…

These are all things that are linked together. What famous pairings come to mind for you?

How about art and music?

Wendy Heiges, Adams County Arts Council Program Director, believes the two art forms work together in perfect harmony.

“Music sets the mood and evokes emotions, inspires us, moves us and promotes artistic creativity,” she explains. “Music can serve as an incredible tool—consider how education is enhanced through music. For example, we all learn our ABCs by singing them to music.”

These are some of the reasons the ACAC is offering numerous Children’s Summer Camps that integrate art and music, offering children multi-sensory, creative experiences:

Start with Art for Pre-Schoolers, June 15-19 (ages 3-4), 9:30-11:30 am   Begin a lifelong passion for creativity by exploring art through music, movement, crafts, stories and more. Cultivate your child’s imagination and develop early learning skills while having fun with new friends and activities. A different theme every day!  Ann Walsh $105 (member $98) Register

Ballerinas & Bears, June 22-26 (ages 3-5), 9:30-11:30 am  If you’re a beginner ballerina or dancer, this fun-filled class is for you!  You’ll learn the elements of ballet and creative movement, wear your favorite costumes, and we’ll have a dancing teddy bear party and performance last camp day.  Hope VonSas $90 (member $83) Register

Turn Songs into Paintings, June 8-12 (ages 8-10), 9-12 pm  Do colors have sound? Can music become shapes? Learn how artist Kandinsky used shapes and colors as “notes” to make visual artwork. Create your own collection of unique paintings using watercolor, pastel, & printmaking skills while listening to music. Sally Becker $155 (member $145) Register

Check out the full listing of nearly 40 Summer Camps 2015 by clicking here and register your child(ren) today!

Or give a gift certificate to a special child in your life so that he/she can attend a summer camp (call 717-334-5006 to learn more) and please note that camp scholarships are available (click here for info–scroll down to “Children’s Summer Camps”).

 

 

Xuchialt Artists and Upper Adams High School Art Students featured in May

Posted on: April 30th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

Written by Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator

Nicaraguan Dancers

Nicaraguan Dancers

The Adams County Arts Council will showcase the artwork of five artists from the Taller Artistico Xuchialt of Leon, Nicaragua during the month of May in the Reception Hall at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center, 125 S. Washington Street.  The show will include artwork by students, Xuchialt teachers and Adams County artists.  A First Friday reception on May 15-7:30 p.m. will feature a 15 minute full costumed demonstration of traditional dance starting at 5:30 p.m.

The 5 Nicaraguan artists will feature artwork produced at the Taller Artistico Xuchialt School of Art, which is supported by Project Gettysburg-Leon.  The four year program is officially accredited by the Nicaraguan Ministry of Culture and teaches over 120 students each year.  Gina Robinson of Project Gettysburg-Leon says, “All of the teachers are volunteers. They do this for the love of art. It’s a very exciting thing for the arts community to have people so passionate about sharing their arts and culture.”

Marlon Moreno, Xuchialt artist

Marlon Moreno, Xuchialt artist

The Xuchialt artists are scheduled to teach a Primitivista Paint Night at the ACAC on Tuesday, May 5th, from 6-9 p.m. during their three week visit.  The evening will feature folkloric dancing, Nicaraguan folk music and primitivista painting, a bright and colorful form of Nicaraguan painting with common themes of flora, fauna, community life and historical events.  Robinson comments, “It’s a true cultural exchange.  They’re teaching us, we’re teaching them.  This is a chance to share in the growing friendship between Leon, and Adams County.”

The Upper Adams High School art students under the instruction of Lisa Harman will be showing their 2D and 3D artwork in the Studio at the Arts Education Center during the month of May, as well.  A May 1st First Friday student reception will be held in the studio from 5-7:00 p.m.  Their artwork will remain hanging through mid-June.

Upper Adams student work

Upper Adams student work

To register for the Primitivista Paint Night, or for more information about the Taller Artistico Xuchialt exhibit, the Upper Adams High School student show and other upcoming Arts Council exhibitions, news and events or art classes at the Arts Council’s Arts Education Center, visit www.adamsarts.org or call (717) 334-5006.

The Adams County Arts Council’s mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community.

Painting by Bryan Diaz

Painting by Bryan Diaz

Artist Spotlight: Sally Becker

Posted on: April 23rd, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

sally beckerWhile exploring the gully and stream behind her childhood home at the age of five, Sally Becker found clay. Over 50 years later, her Iron Blue Gully Studio sits above that very clay deposit. The iron-rich, bluish clay is a reminder of her first experiences with nature and art, inspiring her work, along with the memories, landscapes and history of her childhood home.

Sally’s mother was not a professional artist, but believed in the importance of art, and shared that belief with her children. Sally took art classes outside of school, and developed the philosophy that art is good for everyone from an early age. Later, she took many courses in clay, as well as drawing, painting and photography, while working toward her BFA at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She went on for a Masters in Education from Penn State, which she credits with improving her effectiveness as a teacher. An elementary and high school art teacher for 40 years, Sally describes herself as the jack of many trades, working in a variety of media.

Sally retired from teaching two years ago, which has opened up opportunities to work in her studio. Ten years ago, she began exploring Encaustic painting, a medium of hot wax and pigment, which originated in ancient Rome. She was able to study this medium with Michael Campbell at Shippensburg University.

Sarah_M_Becker_Memory_Bank_Barn_frontThere’s a lot of clay in her studio, too, but she often mixes media: clay sculptures often have images carved into them, or she will draw with colored slips. She also enjoys drawing with pastels, ink, pencil and graphite. “When I retired, I thought I would start this studio for the fun of it,” Sally says. “But I’m beginning to think there’s more. I am continually drawn to what’s around me where I grew up, landscapes, memories, animals, historical aspects of the farm. I want my family to see these things and remember from my point of view. I want to find a way to get people to think; to make them stop and look.”

fish plateIt makes sense that this urge to inspire people to notice the beauty around them is still with her after 40 years of teaching. Fortunately for our community, Sally continues to share her inspiration and skill teaching classes at the Adams County Arts Council. This session, she is teaching Beginning Drawing and Introduction to Soft Pastels. This summer, she will offer two camps: Turn Songs into Paintings, for ages 8-10 from June 8-12, and 3D Architectural and Figurative Sculpture, for ages 11-14 from June 22-26. Her work can also be seen at numerous ACAC Exhibits and Instructors’ Shows throughout the year… including clay pieces inspired by a 5-year old’s delightful discovery.

 

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Award winning artist Carol Herren Foerster to exhibit drawings at the ACAC in April

Posted on: April 2nd, 2015 by Karen Hendricks
Bok Choy by Carol Herren Foerster

Bok Choy by Carol Herren Foerster

Award winning artist Carol Herren Foerster will be exhibiting a selection of pencil drawings in the Studio at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center during the month of April.  The Arts Council will host an artist’s reception on Friday, April 3rd, from 5-7:30 p.m. at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center located at 125 S. Washington Street, Gettysburg.

“Drawings by Carol Herren Foerster,” represents a range of pencil drawing artwork to include portrait drawings on a larger scale, as well as drawings from nature.  Foerster, with more than 40 years of experience, approaches each piece with a fresh eye and credits her ability to successfully convey light and shadow with each piece by “working from left to right to avoid smearing the graphite.”

Foerster will be offering some tips on how to draw in black and white areas and discussing her pencil drawing techniques on Wednesday, April 22, 1-2:30 p.m. at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center.  The fee is $15 and registration is open.

Click here for more information about Spring 2015 classes at the ACAC including Foester’s pencil technique class, or call (717) 334-5006.

The Adams County Arts Council’s mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community.

Artist Spotlight: Melissa Swift and the Recyclable Art Contest

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

20150327_152842_resized“If you can see beauty in everything, you are an artist.” –Anonymous

Melissa Swift has been teaching art at Fairfield Elementary School since 2007, a position she filled after Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) Board Member Louise Garverick retired. Melissa credits Louise with connecting her to ACAC and introducing her to the Recyclable Art Contest and Exhibit, an event sponsored by the Gettysburg Recycling Committee and McDonald’s, which invites students across Adams County to submit pieces constructed entirely of recyclable materials. This year marks the show’s 20th year, making it the most long-lived event at the the ACAC.

Before inviting her students to showcase their work at ACAC, Melissa holds her own contest at Fairfield Elementary. Participation is voluntary – it’s not a graded project. The children work on their recyclable art projects at home, but the kids look forward to participating every year. She does set aside one day of class time to talk about why it’s important to recycle and to show examples of past projects, encouraging students to think about how they can turn someone else’s trash into an aesthetically pleasing treasure. This year, she discovered students had already started their projects before she even announced the contest. Fairfield Elementary’s contest boasts 48 entries this year, all of which will be invited to participate in the exhibit at ACAC. “There were actually fewer entries this year than last,” Melissa said, “but they are all of high quality, so they will all be invited to participate.” Melissa works hard to teach the children how to transform their work to its highest potential, worthy of aesthetic appreciation.

For the ACAC contest and exhibit, each student may submit one work of art that does not exceed a size of 36 inches in any direction, and that is constructed entirely of recyclable materials. The projects are rated by a panel of judges based on the following criteria:

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Claudia Bricker (2nd grade) points to her garden collage constructed with all recycled materials. Claudia received First place in 2014 in the Fairfield Elementary Show.

  • integration and transformation,
  • creativity, individuality, originality and uniqueness
  • and presentation.

Cash prizes are awarded to the top four entries in each of the following categories:

  • Grades K-2
  • Grades 3-5
  • Grades 6-8
  • Grades 9-12

One piece will be selected as
best in show.

Artists are invited to submit their projects on March 31 and April 1, and the show will open to the public for First Friday on April 3. Awards will be presented on Saturday, April 18. A People’s Choice award will also be presented – be sure to visit the show to cast your vote, and reinforce the message that if we stop to look long enough, there truly is beauty in everything.

Some photos of the Fairfield Elementary entries for 2015:

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Photos: A Magical Evening with Kelly Corrigan

Posted on: March 26th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

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It was most likely the largest crowd ever assembled in the Adams County Arts Council–close to a sellout crowd enjoyed a fun evening full of laughter and great conversation with New York Times bestselling author Kelly Corrigan last Friday, March 20. Many thanks to all who came!

Also a huge thank you to the following sponsors:

Event sponsors:

ENJOY the following photos, capturing the FUN spirit of the evening, by photographer Casey Martin. (Tip: Keep an eye out for some of these photos to appear in the next issue of Celebrate Gettysburg magazine.)

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Setting the scene for a lovely evening: live jazz music by Pomona’s Trio

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Lively bidding–some of it competitive–on the evening’s silent auction items!

 

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WellSpan Gettysburg Hospital President Jane Hyde (Title Sponsor) with author Kelly Corrigan and Adams County Arts Council Executive Director Chris Glatfelter

 

 

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Event Co-Chair Lisa Cadigan welcomes the crowd

 

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The one and only Kelly Corrigan!

 

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Attendees enjoyed meeting Kelly and having their copies of Glitter and Glue signed

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There were even a few brave men in attendance!

 

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The event’s planning committee, the ACAC Marketing Committee with Kelly Corrigan

 

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What made the committee laugh? Kelly said, “Remember it’s almost ‘the best part of the day.'” (You had to be there… to get the joke.) :-)

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Event Sponsors
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The Similarities Between The Hunger Games’ Katniss Everdeen & Glitter & Glue’s Kelly Corrigan

Posted on: March 17th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks
Kelly Corrigan - "Will Travel for Charity" - coming to the ACAC this Fri, March 20!

Kelly Corrigan – “Will Travel for Charity” – coming to the ACAC this Fri, March 20!

By Elle Lamboy, ACAC Marketing Committee Member

There’s nothing quite like the feeling you get after you read a good book cover to cover.

A feeling that I’ve missed since my son Brooks was born and he introduced me to the wonderful world of motherhood. Suddenly, he gets any and all feelings I can handle.

Thankfully, my membership in the Adams County Arts Council re-invigorated my love of reading by introducing me to Kelly Corrigan’s new memoir, Glitter & Glue (coming to the ACAC this Friday! Click here for details!)

On a recent road trip to New Jersey, with Brooks snoozing in the back seat, I made my husband’s day by saying, “Sorry, babe, I won’t be too chatty this car ride. I’m going to read Glitter & Glue.”

As he feigned disappointment he replied, “Good for you…I haven’t seen you read a book since The Hunger Games.”

I read The Hunger Games series in 2011.

As I finished the last page of Glitter & Glue on our return trip home and closed the cover with a great sense of accomplishment I looked at my husband, with tears in my eyes, and said, “That book made me want to laugh, cry, and call my mom all at the same time.”

“Sounds quite different from The Hunger Games,” he said.

At first, I agreed with him. But, the more I thought about it; there are actually several similarities between Katniss Everdeen, the protagonist in The Hunger Games, and Kelly Corrigan of Glitter & Glue.

They Are Both Anti-Establishment

In The Hunger Games novels, Katniss bands together with fellow revolutionists to rebel against the Capitol’s corruption.

In Glitter & Glue, Kelly is fighting to get out from under her mother’s roof stating, “Things happen when you leave the house.”

While Kelly’s mother longed for her to, “…walk out the door and go to an office, like everyone else,” Kelly had other plans. She craved “life experience” and the only way for her to obtain that was to hop on a plane with her best girlfriend and head to Australia.

They Are Both Unlikely Caretakers

At the start of The Hunger Games Katniss is running around the woods with her best friend, Gale, shooting her bow and arrow and hating everything conventional. Yet, when her sister is in danger of heading to the Hunger Games, she sacrifices herself and fights in her place. She steps into the role of caretaker again with Rue and Peta.

Kelly may have gone to Australia to break free from work and obligations but she ironically ends up landing the most stressful, heavy, rewarding, and laborious job in the world—childcare. Being a nanny to young kids is challenging in a “normal” family situation. But, Kelly cares for two children who lost their mother to cancer. They not only need someone to take them to school, cook them dinner, and go to the park, but also someone to make them feel whole again. It seems like an impossible order for someone like Kelly. But she goes from considering herself a “weird new appendage hanging off the sagging mobile that is the Tanner family” to “feeling so much” for Milly and Martin Tanner.

They Are Both Survivors

Katniss is the epitome of a survivalist. She keeps her family and community afloat while living in District 12 and comes out as victor in the Hunger Games.

Kelly is a modern day survivalist. She manages to survive and thrive as nanny and surrogate mother for the Tanner family. Later in the book, she’s a successful author and mother of two. She has a loving marriage. She is a caring and present daughter. She’s a philanthropist. She’s an inspiration.

Sure, reading about Katniss fighting for her life and the lives of everyone in the other districts was exciting. But, as a new mom, there was nothing more inspirational or hopeful than the end of Kelly’s book. When she realizes that even after all her exciting trips around the world, exhilarating book tours, and a high-powered career, the greatest adventure of all is daily survival alongside her family.

They Both Gain An Appreciation For Their Mothers

Katniss starts out resenting her mother, but develops a new admiration for her when she sees her caring for other warriors and, later, for herself.

Kelly goes through a similar transformation throughout Glitter and Glue. When she first leaves for Australia she can’t wait to get away from her mother. But, as she finds herself in the “mom” role with the Tanner family, she begins to listen to her mother’s voice in her head instead of mocking it.

Before Kelly left for her trip she preached that there is no “poetry” in words of complacency like, “ground-beef special, informational interview, staff development.” Yet Kelly finds herself miles away from home, gaining her “life experience” by emulating her mother, “…stockpiling hamburger meat, sorting through hair dyes, demanding eye contact, staring down the occasional adversary.” But, she’s not resentful, or ashamed. In fact, she “ find[s] the likeness kind of exhilarating.”

Unlike Katniss’ journey, Kelly’s adventure rang very close to home for me. As a new mom, I find myself appreciating my mother, and moms everywhere, in a very different way. And while I tended to fight my mom’s voice ringing inside my head when I first moved out on my own, I find myself searching for it now and, like Kelly, smile when I do something my mom did or yell something she screamed at me over and over again.

But, I must say, some nights as I’m trying to get dinner on the table after my 9 to 5 with two hungry boys yelling my name, life is also a bit like The Hunger Games.

Artist Spotlight: Linda Fauth

Posted on: March 11th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks
Linda Fauth, "at home" in the ACAC's kitchen

Linda Fauth, “at home” in the ACAC’s kitchen

St. Patrick’s Day is upon us and seems like the perfect time to profile a culinary instructor who enjoys focusing on “spring greens.”

Linda Fauth, long-time consumer science (“home ec”) teacher, may be retired, but she is still enjoying sharing her culinary and creative skills with a new group of students of all ages, through classes at the ACAC.

A native of Red Lion, in nearby York County, Linda says she inherited many of her talents from her mother. “She was a great cook and seamstress,” Linda explains, “So the apple didn’t fall far from the tree!”

After graduating from Albright College with a degree in family & consumer science, a move to New Jersey, and the earning of her master’s degree in education, Linda settled in Adams County in 1978.

She taught numerous classes including culinary and nutrition classes to middle schoolers in the Upper Adams School District, for more than 30 years, retiring in 2011.

Since then, she has taught numerous adult and children’s classes at the ACAC, including a tofu workshop; one of the highlights was creating a chocolate silk pie made with tofu.

“I have good, standard recipes I’ve used for many years, but I’m always trying new things,” Linda says. “Cooking Light is my favorite book and magazine for discovering new recipes.”

A previous class participant

A previous class participant

Linda is always modifying her classes, especially to reflect the trend towards more healthful eating.

Her next class for adults, “Spring Market Cooking,” includes several recipes featuring kale, considered one of the healthiest, nutrient-dense foods.

Spring Market Cooking!  Thursday, May 14, 6-8:30 pm Learn creative ways to prepare healthy appetizers, entrees and desserts using kale, asparagus and spring’s lush bounty.  Prepare and eat a kale salad, Portuguese kale soup, fruit salsa, a light entrée and something sweet and sumptuous for dessert.  Linda Fauth, $45 ($42 member) Register

One of Linda's former ACAC students proudly displays her edible creation!

One of Linda’s former ACAC students proudly displays her edible creation!

Linda also enjoys teaching 9, 10 and 11-year olds, through summer arts camps at the ACAC. Three years in a row, she has taught students how to make kid-friendly dishes they can easily replicate at home: smoothies, soft pretzels, mini pizzas, macaroni and cheese, and more.

“Sewing is Fun” is another popular camp Linda has taught for several summers. She abides by a special motto when it comes to her students’ creations. “I always tell my students they should like their projects and finish them—I always stay after class to help students finish sewing their projects if need be.”

Here are Linda’s upcoming 2015 summer arts camps:

Sewing is Fun! July 27-31 (ages 9-11) 1-4 pm  Spend the week learning both hand and machine sewing skills and see how easy sewing can be… and fun too!  Choose your own fabric and create your very own chef’s apron, a tote bag, and decorative pillows. Linda Fauth $152 (member $142) Register

Cooks in the Kitchen July 20-24 (ages 9-11), 9-12 pm  Begin your journey into the culinary world by learning about nutritious fun foods. Develop confidence around the kitchen- learn about proper measurements, safety issues and what kitchen tools to use! Make favorites: soft pretzels, orange julius, ice cream, mac and cheese, and fresh salsa and more! Linda Fauth $160 ($150) Register

Previous "Sewing is Fun" campers

Previous “Sewing is Fun” campers

One of Linda's previous kids' cooking camps

One of Linda’s previous kids’ cooking camps

Previous "Sewing is Fun" campers

Previous “Sewing is Fun” campers

Spending time in the kitchen isn’t a chore to Linda: “The kitchen here (at the ACAC) is awesome—it’s so easy to set up and involve the class in the cooking process. Afterwards, there’s plenty of room for us to eat as well!”

When she’s not cooking at the ACAC, Linda enjoys spending time as a food and wellness volunteer through the Penn State Extension Service, making presentations to schools, business meetings, and other groups. One of their current programs is called Dining with Diabetes.

She also enjoys sewing for her grandchildren; her latest creations have included dresses, a Hawaiian shirt, a puppet theater, and alphabet charts.

Linda says her favorite, prized recipe of all time is a family recipe that’s been handed down for generations, for sticky buns. But she also enjoys making sourdough starter, baking bread, cakes, cookies and cream puffs.

Her neighbors likely consider themselves very lucky. She says she often shares her culinary creations with them—but along with those tasty treats comes a request: She always asks for their honest feedback on all new recipes. Sounds like a delicious relationship!

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An ABC chart Linda made for her grandchildren

 

 

 

 

Waldo’s Arts Community & Diane Cromer to exhibit at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center in March

Posted on: March 6th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

By Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator

Artist: Chris Lauer

Artist: Chris Lauer

Waldo’s Arts Community artworks and Diane Cromer’s artworks will be on display at the Adams County Arts Council’s Arts Education Center, 125 S. Washington Street, during the month of March.  The ACAC will feature Waldo’s 2D and 3D artwork in the Gallery and Diane Cromer’s collection of artwork in the Studio and will host a First Friday reception from 5-7:30 p.m. on March 6th.  Along with the show openings, ACAC instructors, Jack Handshaw and Bert Danielson will be on hand to demonstrate their craft and The Storytellers will be performing live music as part of the First Friday festivities.

The Waldo’s Arts Community, formerly Waldo’s on Stratton, will demonstrate their diverse range of style and subject matter, to include painting, sculpture, photography, mixed media, printmaking, hand lettering and jewelry.  The 10 member group has been working separately and creating separately to prepare for the March 6th opening.  Prior to closing their doors last fall, Waldo’s was an active group of artists whose mission was to support and nurture the creative community.  The idea behind Waldo’s was to introduce young people to the creative lifestyle of art and music.  Founding member, Chris Laurer, says, “it will be a neat experience for this particular community of artists to come together as a group and show our work together.”  Lauer continues, “We have a few new members and I’m pleased that we’re still growing and finding new artists to be a part of this community.”

Artist: Diane Cromer

Artist: Diane Cromer

Also on display in the Studio through the month of March is a collection of realistic wildlife and landscape paintings and drawings by Hanover artist, Diane Cromer. Cromer, a self-taught artist started painting 30 years ago and is inspired to create work that conveys her appreciation of nature.  She says, “I like to place the viewer in the environment of the subject.  Our daily emotional survival depends on seeing beauty.”

For more information about Waldo’s Arts Community, Diane Cromer, other Arts Council exhibitions, art classes, news and events at the Arts Council’s Arts Education Center, call (717) 334-5006 or visit us today!

Gettysburg’s very own “Van Gogh” works with some of the biggest names in the performing arts

Posted on: March 3rd, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

We are thrilled to partner with Graphcom and Celebrate Gettysburg magazine as media sponsors for the March 20 event, An Evening with NY Times Best-Selling Author Kelly Corrigan! Today we spotlight an extremely creative and colorful division of Graphcom, Field and Floor FX:

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Have you ever created a 7-foot tall cotton candy treat? Doug Gardner, director of Field and Floor FX, has. No, this particular cotton candy won’t give you a monster-sized cavity, because it’s a prop.

Doug and the team at Field and Floor FX, a Graphcom company here in Adams County, work with some of the biggest names in performing arts. They print digital flags, floors, and costume fabrics, as well as create larger-than-life props for illustrious programs like the Santa Clara Vanguard Drum and Bugle Corps, of Santa Clara, California and Onyx Color Guard, of Dayton, Ohio.

Working hand in hand with the creative minds behind these performing groups, Field and Floor FX translates their vision in 3D, which often involves being elbow deep in paint, or whittling out impossibly cool props like the Michelangelo of high-density foam.

In a feat of visual interest, Field and Floor FX worked with Cypress Independent Color Guard, of Houston, Texas to create luggage props for their show, which, through reflection and stylistic approach, is an ode to the personal life of Marlene Dietrich.

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“There is a high degree of competition with and between the ensembles we work with,” Doug says. “We work with talented show designers to bring their visions to life. The inclusion of creative props can catapult the overall look of a show making it unique and setting it apart from the competition.”

The impact created by the oversized and scaled luggage pieces did just that for Cypress. The pieces were created using high-density foam blocks and were enhanced by vinyl graphics on all sides giving a 3D look from a distance, though the luggage pieces were actually flat on all sides.

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The Field and Floor FX team also created a number of show-stopping props for Santa Clara Vanguard Drum Corps 2014 production of Scheherazade. “It is incredibly rewarding to take someone’s vision and create something unique that surpasses their expectation,” Doug says. “The challenge with these creative endeavors is that not only must they be visually pleasing and help the ensembles tell their story, but they must also be extremely durable and logistically functional.”

The first of the projects for Scheherazade were 24 lightweight stacks of pillows that were utilized by performers during the production. Performers danced on top of them and created various staging opportunities that lent to the overall dramatic effect of the show. The pillows were hand carved from high-density foam for durability and strength. They were then hand painted. The last step to give the impression of real, sumptuous velvet pillows was to apply added detail through vinyl graphics. The finishing touch on this project was to attach tassels to each pillow, a design element that also connected the props to the drum corps’ costumes. (Click here for a brief YouTube clip of the performance, including the “pillows!”)

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This performance included unique feather fans created by Field and Floor FX to add to the overall effect and theme of the show. The bases of the fans were created using vacuumed form molded medallions.  Doug added ostrich and peacock feathers in a variety of colors to compliment the style and color pallet of the show design and costumes. Reflective mylar tape was added as a detail and special effect to catch and reflect the light giving the fans a majestic appearance.

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Field and Floor FX also created large-scale props using design elements that reflect and compliment the overall style and period of the show. The backdrops were created using vinyl graphics that were applied to contour shaped high-density PVC board. The colorful design element was carried over and used throughout the entire production. The large-scale props, fans, and pillows work together as a whole to paint a picture for the audience.

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Van Gogh said, “Great things are done by a series of small things brought together.” If this is indeed true, it is no wonder that all of the detail put in to each Field and Floor FX creation does its part to create a great show for the performing groups lucky enough to work with them.
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 To learn more about Field and Floor FX, click here!

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