Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County PA

The Arts are a Gift for Future Generations

Posted on: December 17th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

GiveNow

In the world of education, where test scores are often valued above participation in the arts, we are losing sight of the fact that academic success depends on creative thinking.  According to pbs.org and a report by Americans for the Arts, “young people who participate regularly in the arts (three hours a day on three days each week through one full year) are four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement, to participate in a math and science fair or to win an award for writing an essay or poem than children who do not participate.” A Gallup study on entrepreneurship concluded creative thinking is the crucial trait shared among successful entrepreneurs.  Also reported on pbs.org, “A study published in 2007 by Christopher Johnson, professor of music education and music therapy at the University of Kansas, revealed that students in elementary schools with superior music education programs scored around 22 percent higher in English and 20 percent higher in math scores on standardized tests, compared to schools with low-quality music programs, regardless of socioeconomic disparities among the schools or school districts.”

If we know the arts are responsible for building future generations of creative thinkers (not to mention, happier people), shouldn’t we invest in that endeavor?

Preschoolers work on their Hungry Caterpillar books

Preschoolers work on their Hungry Caterpillar books

In 2014, at the Adams County Arts Council provided enriching arts experiences for:

  • 246 pre-K children, who will likely be better prepared to thrive in a school environment than peers who did not participate in such programs;
  • 299 summer campers, who developed their minds and bodies with movement classes, culinary classes, painting, textiles, clay and collage;
  • 174 high school and middle school students, who enjoyed after-school classes in the new Eat Smart – Play Hard program, which teaches the benefit of good nutrition with a creative twist;
    Adult students enjoy a Paint & Wine evening with Marie Betlyon Smith

    Adult students enjoy a Paint & Wine evening class

  • 1,558 students, who enjoyed artistic experiences with Artists-in-residence; and
  • 663 adults, who continued on a journey of lifelong learning through a variety of art classes.

Twenty-two percent of the children who took classes did so on a full scholarship, thanks to ACAC’s commitment to provide access to lower income families.

These gifts given to our community by the Adams County Arts Council are trends to build upon.  So we are asking you to please give back, and pass it on.

Give Back…And Pass it On
From December 16 – 18
, ACAC will be raising funds online to ensure the continued ability to provide our community with enriching experiences, activities and educational opportunities.  Our goal is to raise $7,200 in 72 hours, and you can help.

  1. Give Back.
    There are plenty of reasons to say thank you, and your gift helps ensure the continued creative spirit that thrives in our community.
  2. Pass It On.
    Share this article with everyone you know!  Use social media accounts, and email your entire address book.  The more engaged our community becomes, the more the arts will thrive. And the more the arts thrive, the richer all of our lives become.
  3. Stay Tuned. Watch and share our Facebook and Twitter posts from December 16-18, as we track the progress of the campaign.  The more you help share the news, the more successful we will all be! Also, if you haven’t already, please subscribe to our email list (enter your email address in the upper right hand corner of this page).  Learn about all of the opportunities ACAC has for you throughout the year.
Kelly Corrigan (Photo Credit: Betsy Barnes)

Kelly Corrigan (Photo Credit: Betsy Barnes)

We thank you in advance for your gift. Donors of $50 or more will receive recognition on the blog and in a special holiday email greeting following the campaign. Givers of $250 or more will be entered into a raffle for a free class at the ACAC this January or for a ticket to our upcoming event with NY Times Best-selling Author Kelly Corrigan in March.

Enjoy this season of giving!

 

In the Spirit of Gratitude

Posted on: December 15th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

artisagift

grat·i·tude (noun) the quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation and to return kindness.

Holiday traditions encourage us to take pause and to appreciate the many gifts we receive throughout our lives, so often taken for granted.

As you reflect on the things for which you are thankful this year, and make your list of gifts to give, please remember the organizations in our community that add so much to our lives, like the Adams County Arts Council.

Why should I be thankful for ACAC?
In 2014, ACAC provided our community with educational opportunities like camps, classes and brown bag lunch seminars.  Artists-in-residence shared their expertise providing creative experiences for over 1,500 students. There were social opportunities like the Masquerade Ball, the summer fiesta and Tea with Mamie. There were exhibits throughout the year, both at the Center and throughout the community in places like the Farmer’s Market and Hauser’s Winery, as well as a Juried Art Exhibition at Schmucker Hall, which attracted more than 100 artists.  There were community partnerships like the AOK summer musical, Tarzan, and the evening with scholar and retired  Rhode Island Chief Justice Frank J. Williams, whose Lincoln stories were coupled with a lovely culinary experience, thanks to a partnership with Wendy Allen of Lincoln into Art.

2014 was a year of giving for the Adams County Arts Council, which is constantly evolving with new ways to cultivate an arts-rich community.

From December 16 – 18, ACAC will be raising funds online to ensure the continued ability to provide our community with enriching experiences, activities and educational opportunities.  Our goal is to raise $7,200 in 72 hours, and you can help.

Give Back…And Pass It On.
Acknowledging the treasury the arts provides to our community, can you give a gift back to the arts this time of year? It’s simple to ensure that the arts will continue to thrive in Adams County for years to come: just give back, and pass it on. Both steps are important, and we appreciate your support.

1. Give back.
Beginning tomorrow, and continuing through Thursday, ACAC is hosting a special online fundraising event. Make your gift of $50, $100, $250 or in any amount you have to give by clicking here. We are hoping to raise $7,200 in 72 hours, but we need your help!

2. Pass it on.
Share the gift of giving with your friends through your social media accounts or by email. Passing this post on to as many people as possible will build our creative community, ensuring future success.  Click the icons below and share, share, share!

3. Stay tuned. If you haven’t already subscribed, please sign up to receive emails from ACAC (Enter your email address at the top of this page, on the right.) Learn about all of the opportunities ACAC has for you throughout the year. And watch our Facebook and Twitter feeds, as we update progress of this fantastic online event!

Kelly Corrigan (Photo Credit: Betsy Barnes)

Kelly Corrigan (Photo Credit: Betsy Barnes)

We thank you in advance for your gift. Donors of $50 or more will receive recognition on the blog and in a special holiday email greeting following the campaign. Givers of $250 or more will be entered into a raffle for a free class at the ACAC this January or for a ticket to our upcoming event with NY Times Best-selling Author Kelly Corrigan in March.
Enjoy this season of giving!

3rdThursdaynoon: Elsie Singmaster Society

Posted on: December 12th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

brown-bag-lunchThe Adams County Arts Council’s Brown Bag Lunch Series, 3rdThursdaynoon, continues on Thursday, December 18 at 12 p.m. at the Arts Education Center, 125 S. Washington St., Gettysburg with featured guests, Sue Hill and Carolyn George, members of Gettysburg’s newly formed Elsie Singmaster Society, who will present Elsie Singmaster’s Stories to Read at Christmas. There is no admission charge for this hour-long program.

A Gettysburg resident from 1901-1958, Elsie Singmaster (1879-1958) was a nationally recognized author whose fictional topics included the Pennsylvania Germans and the Battle of Gettysburg.  She was once called “Gettysburg’s First Lady” by town contemporaries because of her achievements and her leadership participation in the Gettysburg community. Happily, local residents have recently rediscovered Singmaster whose significant literary work and public legacy were nearly forgotten. Singmaster won an O. Henry Award for her Pennsylvania German short story, “The Courier of the Czar” (“Saturday Evening Post,” June 7, 1924) and a Newberry Award Honor Book recognition for her Gettysburg novel, Swords of Steel (Houghton Mifflin, 1934). Stories to Read at Christmas (Houghton Mifflin, 1940) is a collection of Singmaster Christmas stories published to read aloud during the holiday season. Susan Hill and Carolyn George will each read a story from this collection.

Susan Hill is the author of Heart Language: Elsie Singmaster and Her Pennsylvania German Writings (The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2009).  Carolyn George is a long-time Adams County resident whose appreciation of her adopted home’s history is being greatly enriched by Elsie Singmaster’s writings.

The 3rdThursdaynoon series will take a winter hiatus with no programs in January or February and will resume on March 19.

For more information about Arts Council classes, programs, or membership, visit www.adamsarts.org, or call (717) 334-5006.

Give from the heART this holiday season

Posted on: December 11th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

It’s less than two weeks until Christmas and the ACAC can help you complete your gift-giving, with style! Here are 3 ways you can give from the heART:

 

1. “Buy local” at the ACAC’s Holiday Show

Holiday ShowHundreds of hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind items are currently on display at the Arts Education Center, 125 S Washington Street.  What better way to “buy local” and find gifts with local flavor that also fill the gaps in your gift-giving lists. Your purchase not only supports the ACAC, but also benefits local artists and craftspeople. And, aren’t one-of-a-kind gifts the best option for the most treasured people in your life?

(Click here for more Holiday Show info)

2. Gift a gift with “class”

Give the gift of a yoga class!

Give the gift of a yoga class!

While you’re visiting the ACAC, check out our upcoming class and workshop schedule. Why not pre-pay for a friend or loved one to take a gourmet cooking class, a stained-glass workshop, or have fun at a paint & wine night? Better yet, sign up yourself so you can take the class together in the new year. Some of the best gifts are often experiences rather than things.  And the arts are a gift that keep on giving—once a skill has been learned or an experience is had, it is forever in our hearts.

Not sure which class your friends/family members would enjoy? Give them a gift certificate to the ACAC instead. Nationally, gift cards are the most requested holiday gift item for the eighth year in a row. According to the National Retail Federation, the average person purchasing gift cards during the 2014 holiday season is projected to spend $172.74. The ACAC makes it easy to follow this trend!

3. Take care of “the person who has everything”

arts are a giftMake a tax-deductible donation to the nonprofit Adams County Arts Council in honor of your special someone.  Your $50 donation is a gift not only honoring the person you love, but it continues giving to people of all ages who will have access to more art and beauty in their lives thanks to your gift.

Donate $50 or more during December 16-18, and watch the progress of our Give Back-Pass It On campaign on Facebook and Twitter.  Donors will be recognized on the blog and with a special holiday email greeting following the campaign.  Keep an eye on our website and social media channels for more info!

Enjoy giving from the heART this holiday season… and sharing the gift of the ARTS!

Mary Luquette: Art is the “Key” to Life

Posted on: December 8th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

“Art has brought healing to my life. But it’s not only about that. To put art ‘out there’… it’s fantastic to have others benefit from viewing it and learning about my story.”

Mary Luquette of Gettysburg believes art truly saved her life. It’s the “key” to her story…

Mary Luquette (Photo Credit: Karen Hendricks)

Mary Luquette (Photo Credit: Karen Hendricks)

“Growing up, I wanted to be a fashion designer but my parents said ‘no—be practical,’” she explains. “I always sewed, always had an interest in art and fiber, and although it wasn’t the focus of my career, I got into quilting.”

Mary Luquette 4She says quilting and fiber arts came naturally to her. “I have always felt as though I ‘know colors’ and can put different colors and fabrics together.”

But woven into the fabric of her adult life, were the tragic deaths of five family members including her husband.

“Life didn’t make sense, so it didn’t make sense to continue quilting,” Luquette says. “But creating fiber art as a form of expression brought tremendous healing.”

“I was surprised that I was also successful. I was seeing a counselor for the grief and she asked if I was going to keep them (the fiber artwork) under my bed forever. So I started showing and selling them.”

Mary Luquette 1The first art exhibition she entered was the Adams County Arts Council’s 2nd Annual Juried Arts Exhibition in 2005 and Luquette was awarded the prestigious “Best of Show.”

“It was an amazing feeling,” Luquette says. “Fiber art is more accepted today as ‘real’ art. But (nearly 10 years ago, in 2005,) I expected a painting or sculpture to win.”

That first award was a validation of her artistic talent; simultaneously, Luquette was also winning awards for her athletic ability. Running had become another outlet for her pain, and she became a successful triathlon and marathon competitor.

Even though Luquette had quickly become an award-winning artist, she realized two important things: “I wish art could pay the bills, but it’s very tough to make it financially as an artist,” she explains. In her ‘day job,’ Luquette works with autistic children.

Mary Luquette 6Secondly, she realized that she needed to deepen her artistic skills through classes at the arts council.

“I decided I wanted to study the basics because I never really considered myself a ‘real’ artist. I thought it was important to learn the basics—color and form.”

Luquette signed up for drawing, photography and painting classes, and is currently in her third series of drawing classes with Sara Little. “I think every teacher here at the arts council is very passionate about their subject. With Sara, I love her honesty—she’s very critical and she will give you feedback on how to fix your drawings.”

Mary Luquette 5She encourages others to take advantage of the wide range of classes available at the arts council. “My advice is to sign up,” she says. “People who say ‘I can’t’… all they need to do is practice. I don’t say ‘I can’t draw.’ Instead, I say ‘I don’t practice enough.’ That’s all it is.”

“You can’t expect to draw like DaVinci. Just like you can’t expect to run a 5K right away. You start walking and before you know it you’ll be running. I learned how to swim at the age of 60. I’m open to learning new skills. Everyone can learn–it provides an outlet. Some aspect of art is important to express who you are.”

Mary Luquette 3Luquette has taken numerous fiber art classes including week-long sessions in New York state. She estimates that she’s created hundreds of collage and/or fabric art pieces by now.

“Last year my sister died of Alzheimer’s Disease at age 54. I’m inspired to continue creating, by life events,” she says. “The arts are a great way to express things when we can’t verbalize them.”

You could say that art is the key that unlocked her ability to cope with life’s ups and downs… a defining statement from Luquette, especially considering the meaning of “Luquette,” a Canadian/French surname that refers to the occupation of a locksmith.

˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜

To check the ACAC’s list of current classes, click here

To contact Mary Luquette, click here for her email address

To learn more about her story, click here for JourneyThroughGrief.com

Mary Luquette 2

ANNOUNCING: “GLITTER & GLUE” IS COMING TO THE ACAC

Posted on: December 2nd, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

Glitter&Glue-blog-header

Glitter and glue… sounds like the makings of a fun afterschool program resulting in sticky fingers and colorful sprinkles of glitter covering the floor.

But no! Glitter & Glue is an event designed for adults—parents and grandparents alike—and we promise there will be no sticky fingers involved.

Glitter & Glue is the title of an exciting new book released by author Kelly Corrigan. It’s receiving rave reviews, so we are thrilled and honored to snag this incredibly-talented author for an appearance during her upcoming book tour!

Kelly Corrigan (Photo Credit: Betsy Barnes)

Kelly Corrigan (Photo Credit: Betsy Barnes)

Here are all the juicy details:

Enjoy an evening with New York Times best-selling author Kelly Corrigan on Friday, March 20 at 7 pm including a lively author presentation, wine and hors oeuvres, live music by local jazz group Pomona’s Trio, and much more.

Your paperback copy of Corrigan’s latest book Glitter and Glue is included in your $35 ticket. Corrigan, a Pennsylvania native, examines the bond—sometimes nourishing, sometimes exasperating, occasionally divine—between mothers and daughters in Glitter and Glue. “This is the ordinary brilliance of Kelly Corrigan, the irresistible cocktail of lyrical writing and solid, useful insight,” writes the San Francisco Chronicle.

Location: the ACAC’s Arts Education Center, 125 South Washington Street.

A limited number of VIP registrations are available for $50 including preferred seating and placement at the head of the line to meet Corrigan and have your book personally signed.

Register: 717-334-5006 or www.adamsarts.org. Proceeds benefit the non-profit ACAC, whose mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community.

Just a little more “glitter” in the form of book reviews:

trade paperback cover“Kelly Corrigan is no stranger to mining the depths of her heart…[here] Corrigan turns the microscope on her relationship with her own mother…And through her own experience of caring for children, she begins, for the first time, to appreciate the complex woman who raised her.” —O Magazine

“Corrigan remains a lively, nimble cheerleader for the joys of family.”—People

“Kelly Corrigan’s heartfelt homage to motherhood is every bit as tough and funny as it is nostalgic and searching.  It’s a tale about growing up, gaining wisdom, and reconciling with Mom but it’s also an honest meditation on our deepest fears of death and abandonment.  I loved this book, I was moved by this book, and now I will share this book with my own mother— along with my renewed appreciation for certain debts of love that can never be repaid.”—Elizabeth Gilbert, New York Times bestselling author of The Signature of All Things

March 20 – Save the date & hope to see you there! 

For more info and background: Click here for Kelly Corrigan’s website

‘Tis the Season for our Holiday Show & Sale

Posted on: November 20th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Article by Elle Lamboy, ACAC Marketing & Development Committee

Photo-3---Holiday-Show---2014

The chewy bite of an iced sugar cookie. Red cups at Starbucks. The undeniable scent of pine.  Carols singing on the radio while bells ring in the street. Quality time with food, family and friends.

These festive traditions ignite a certain kind of magic, often juxtaposed by a more stressful reality of holiday shopping.

Fortunately, the Adams County Arts Council’s (ACAC) annual Holiday Show and Sale transforms the frantic buzzkill of holiday shopping into an enjoyable art.

The Show & Sale features about 50 member artists who will have the rare opportunity to “showcase a collection of their work as opposed to just one piece,” says Wendy Heiges, Program Director at the ACAC. “It gives local artists a platform to sell and exhibit their work that they wouldn’t have otherwise.”

This year promises a wonderfully eclectic collection with something creative for everyone on your shopping list—including photography, pottery, stationary, hand-painted ornaments, centerpieces, textiles, jewelry and so much more. A full list of participating artists can be found here.

singingThe Holiday Show & Sale will officially kick off on First Friday, December 5, from 5:00 p.m. -7:30 p.m. This festive and fun reception will feature holiday confections, music from Pomona’s Trio (left, featuring ACAC Board Member Lisa Cadigan on vocals, ACAC culinary instructor Marc Jalbert on guitar, and Gettysburg College professor Bret Crawford on saxophone), carols from the Gettysburg Children’s Choir High School Ensemble, and the opportunity to get first dibs on hand-crafted, local gifts.

Your patronage not only supports local artists in the community; it also helps the ACAC, which will receive a 40% commission for all gifts and artwork purchased.

To get a head start on your holiday shopping, the ACAC will be open for “sneak previews” of the show beginning Tuesday, November 25.  Please visit our website to view our extended holiday hours and schedule or give us a call. For your convenience, the Show & Sale is featured in the reception hall this year which is located just left of the entrance to the Center.

The ACAC’s  annual Holiday Show and Sale channels all that is wonderful about the holidays—the joy of giving, the awakening of the senses and the importance of giving back to our community—leaving the crowds and chaos behind!

You’ll be pleasantly surprised at all we have in store, and may even find your inner artist in the process.

Stay tuned to our blog for updates throughout the sale, including special demos from participating artists!

Questions?  Call (717) 334-5006.

Photo---Holiday-Show---2014[2]

Third Thursday Brown Bag Lunch Series: A Warm Welcome to Judy Pohlhaus of Random House

Posted on: November 7th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

blogphotoAccording to her husband, Judy Pohlhaus has the perfect job.  She gets to read new books, talk to people on the phone about them, and give presentations to groups where she shares her favorites.  Employed by Random House for 29 years, Judy started as a summer intern and never left, indicating her husband may be on to something.  She currently works as a telephone sales manager in Random House’s Westminster, Maryland location, where she manages two large accounts and four library systems, offering her the opportunity to visit a variety of locations including five Barnes and Noble stores across Maryland, day and evening book group meetings, and this month, our own Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) in Gettysburg.

Please plan to take your lunch break at the ACAC on Thursday, November 20 at noon to hear Judy speak about the newest titles from Random House. The program will last about an hour. The selection is sure to make great reads and gift ideas for the holidays.  She will bring galleys and advanced copies of several titles to be raffled off at the end of the event, including:

  • NY Times bestselling author Kelly Corrigan’s newest memoir, Glitter and Glue;
  • Neil Patrick Harris: Choose your own Autobiography, by Tony and Emmy award-winning stage and screen performer Neil Patrick Harris;
  • Barefoot Contessa Ina Garten’s newest cookbook, Make it Ahead;
  • Station Eleven:  A Novel, by Emily St. John Mandel;
  • and others, to remain a surprise until the event.

Judy will also have signed copies of A Star for Mrs. Blake, a historical fiction novel by April Smith; her first foray into a new genre after her popular Ana Grey FBI mystery/thrillers.

It’s sure to be an afternoon of great conversation and book suggestions, and it’s FREE!

Thursday, November 20, 2014 at noon at the Adams County Arts Council Education Center

125 S. Washington Street

Gettysburg, PA 17325

For more information, please call (717) 334-5006

Share the event with friends and RSVP on Facebook here.

In the Artist Spotlight: Debbie Westmoreland

Posted on: November 5th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

IMG_9340web

You could say that everything Debbie Westmoreland does, she does with style.

From fashioning Barbie doll clothes at the age of six, to working for a major New York department store, and curating historical exhibits—all of these experiences have put her on a path that recently brought her to Gettysburg where she now shares her creative gifts through the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC).

Detail, "Floral Abstract", wool and silk

Detail, “Floral Abstract”, wool and silk

By day, Westmoreland may be one of the friendly smiling faces visitors encounter when they enter the ACAC and are greeted by support staff. But Westmoreland is also part of the huge network of talented instructors who lead classes at the arts council. She has taught interior design classes for adults as well as fashion design classes for the children’s afterschool and summer programs. Additionally, her textile art has been featured in numerous ACAC exhibits. And she continues to learn and grow as an artist, by taking classes from other arts council instructors.

“I’ve always been interested in textiles, fashion and history,” the Gettysburg woman explains. “And my career path is an example of that… but being in this environment has given me the confidence to truly pursue being an artist (for the first time),” she explains.

Fiber art by Debbie Westmoreland

Fiber art by Debbie Westmoreland

It’s been a long, winding road for Westmoreland, who learned how to sew at a young age, from her mother and grandmothers as she grew up in the Reading area. “My Pennsylvania German heritage made me appreciate the importance of textiles,” she claims.

Even though her heart was in the fashion industry, her head steered her towards a more practical college major—design and merchandising—at Drexel University, Philadelphia. While working in retailing for Bergdorf Goodman in New York City, she realized she needed a creative outlet. So she decided to go back to school for her BFA in interior design from the New York School of Interior Design.

After working at several design firms in New York and New Jersey, Westmoreland again sought a more creative path—with a twist. “I realized I wanted to tie my love of history into my work.” She again headed back to school, studying at Seaton Hall, for her Master of Arts in Museum Professions.

This led to a position she describes as “one of the most creative experiences I’ve ever had”–Curator and Collections Manager for the Morris County Historical Society in New Jersey—a position she held for 13 years.

In 2011, when her husband reached retirement age, the couple decided to relocate to Gettysburg. “This area is a welcoming and nurturing setting for artists,” she explains. “It’s hard for me to create in a crowded, fast-paced environment, but Adams County is a comfortable environment, (more conducive to producing artwork).”

In addition to exhibiting her work periodically through members’ shows at the ACAC, her stylish fashions and textile artwork can both be found at A&A Village Treasures, Chambersburg Street, Gettysburg.

IMG_9384web

“I feel as though I’m finally underway as an independent artist—it’s another step or chapter in my career,” she says. All achieved with her ever-evolving flair for style.

To contact Debbie Westmoreland: westmorelanddebbie (at) gmail.com

"Fantasy Turquoise," a wrap by Debbie Westmoreland

“Fantasy Turquoise,” a wrap by Debbie Westmoreland

 

Detail, "Fantasy Turquoise"

Detail, “Fantasy Turquoise”

 

Artist Spotlight: Andrew Smith

Posted on: October 9th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Photography is an art form that magically captures a single moment.  The photographer freezes time for a split second allowing viewers to zoom in on details that may otherwise have passed us by.  But what if the photographer not only captures a moment, but also creates it?  This is a question ACAC member artist Andrew Smith addresses, particularly with his abstract photography.  “One can pose individuals in a portrait or choose how far to focus in on a still life, but the photographer typically can’t change the subject. [My] abstract work adds an extra dimension to the creative process,” says Smith, who has manipulated and captured colored liquids in varying states with macro-photography to pleasing results.  His pieces have been included in ACAC’s annual Abstract Show for the past two years.

This piece appeared in the Adams County Arts Council's 2014 Abstract Show last summer.

Fluid III appeared in the Adams County Arts Council’s 2014 Abstract Show last summer.

Andrew Smith experiments with subjects in both liquid and solid forms.

Andrew Smith experiments with subjects in both liquid and solid forms.

As a full-time middle school music teacher and band director at Susquenita Middle School, Andrew doesn’t aggressively pursue photography as a career right now, but he feels fortunate to have been included in several juried shows, and has some items for sale in the Frame Shop & Gallery in Hanover.  In addition to his macro-liquid shots, he has a great eye for landscapes, and hosted nine “photo-walks” in the area from 2008-2013, availing area participants to photograph interesting scenes and share their results on a custom Flickr page.

Lost in Death was shot during a Photo Walk, and appeared in

Lost in Death was shot during a Photo Walk, and appeared in the 2012 Gettysburg Festival juried exhibit.

Andrew not only made these tortilla chips, he seasoned them to a perfection requiring no dips, and then captured them in a tantalizing photograph.

Andrew not only made these tortilla chips, he also seasoned them to a perfection requiring no dip, and then captured them in a tantalizing photograph.

Regardless of subject matter, however, Andrew enjoys the entire process of his projects – from composition through printing and choosing the mattes and frames for finished pieces. Perusing his portfolio, you will find that in addition to nature, landscapes and abstracts, Andrew is also a foodie – enjoying the creation and manipulation of recipes, which he then captures in tantalizing images before sharing and eating his art.

Creativity obviously infuses all he does, and like most creative folks who know to value process over outcome, the results for the rest of us are quite good. You can see more of Andrew’s work on his website, Visual Realia, and you can follow him on Facebook, Twitter and Flickr.

Photos © Andrew Smith. Reproduction of any image is prohibited without express consent of the artist.

 

 

 

All Set for a “Mad” Masquerade Party

Posted on: September 30th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

Don’t you just love the word “masquerade?” According to Merriam-Webster:

Masquerade - 

a :  a social gathering of persons wearing masks and often fantastic costumes
b :  a costume for wear at such a gathering

2:  an action or appearance that is mere disguise or show

Origin of MASQUERADE: Middle French, from Old Italian dialect mascarada, from Old Italian maschera mask; first known use: 1587

What a rich history, and what a colorful word!

ID-10084671

Here at the Adams County Arts Council, the annual Masquerade Party has become a tradition–14 years strong, this year, and it never fails to be a colorful event that features many colorful characters.

Be sure to join us for the 14th Annual CenturyLink Masquerade Party this year, set for October 24. “Alice in Disco Wonderland” is the theme, featuring live music by the Colgan-Hirsh Band with the Slammin’ Horms. Costume or formal wear/mask is requested. Held at the elegant Gettysburg Hotel, 1 Lincoln Square, this event is one of the arts council’s major annual fundraisers. Secure a dinner/party combo ticket (7 pm) or party-only ticket (8 pm) through this link. (Hint: make sure your computer or phone volume is up, when you click on the link.)

There are some fantastic possibilities for this year’s costumes! To give everyone a helping hand, here are some “mad” brainstorming ideas along the Alice in Wonderland, as well as the Disco, themes:

  • Alice (of course!)
  • The White Rabbit
  • Tea party
  • The Mad Hatter
  • Queen of Hearts
  • Cheshire Cat
  • 1970s Disco era
  • Saturday Night Fever
  • The Village People
  • KC & the Sunshine Band

And for a fun trip down memory lane, let’s rewind the clock to 2010. I turned to fellow ACAC Marketing Committee member Nanette Hatzes, who snapped dozens of pics at the 10th Annual event, which featured a fun Hollywood theme. Enjoy some of her highlights!

5154321676_d8a04f9b5e_n

5153703163_32bd5c40e1_n

5153700777_087fa1bcba_n

5154306900_fb9cb31ac9_n

5153651628_75227577cd_n

5153651072_cafe1c72c8_n

5153649642_c37b2840ea_n

5153648724_f0c58c92d9_n

5153648136_2746298658_n

5153647704_2d055e5bd6_n

5153040015_d1c7460fd7_n

- All photos courtesy Nanette Hatzes

Time Well Spent with Paint and Wine

Posted on: September 25th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

10494637_1438922073062932_4388369497265544773_nAs the passing days of my life turn into months and years, I realize I am running out of time to become the next van Gogh.  I have been pretty busy raising children and working over the past several years, and I haven’t taken much time to practice painting.  Yet I have always wanted to know how to paint. I often find myself viewing the world in watercolors, imagining beautiful sky-scapes on canvas, wishing I knew how to capture the beauty of a fall day in a painting. I have also always wanted to win an Oscar for best actress, but we’ll stay focused here and keep it real.

Last fall, I registered for a watercolor class at the ACAC. Committed to cutting out a little time just for me, I impressed myself with my ability to carve out the three hours a week to attend the class, only to experience a head-slapping V-8 moment when I was reminded that if one wants to become fluent in any creative process, she has to practice, preferably daily.  I hadn’t cut out the time to practice.  I had literally budgeted my time to the minute just to be able to attend the class.  Our instructor suggested we set up an area in our homes where our paints were always accessible, which sounded wonderful, but I knew with a heavy heart from day one that this was not a class I would be able to continue with any success at this season in my life.

Although I highly recommend the class and the instructor, I confess my paints have remained in the closet for the most part since last year. They come out every now and again on a random Saturday when my daughter and I have a few hours to play with paint together.  Now that it’s fall again, Sunday afternoons leave us a few hours clear of distraction while the boys in our house watch football, so maybe we’ll paint then, too.

I had resolved to put my dreams to master painting aside for the time being, when another opportunity presented itself.  I was intrigued to hear about the Paint and Wine Nights hosted at the ACAC, taught by instructor Marie Betlyon Smith.  During these monthly evening classes, the ACAC provides paints, easels and brushes, while Marie supplies a sample painting, accessible instruction, and music. Students are invited to munch on snacks and enjoy the beverages of their choice, while Marie leads the class through a complete work, from start to finish, in just a few hours.  No experience is necessary.  Seriously.  Absolutely none.  I went to my first class on August 7, and painted this: mypainting

 

There are a variety of people who come to the class – regulars committed not to miss a class, dabblers like me who will fit it in when we can, people who have never touched a brush, and some avid painters who may not even paint the subject matter presented, but who enjoy the opportunity to paint in community.  The result is a truly lovely evening of relaxation and creativity with interesting people, complete with the satisfaction of a finished painting to bring home.

Marie leads her students through the process of her sample painting, but artists are free to vary the palette and subject as they wish.  I pretty much followed the example during my first class, but next time I might branch out a little more, like my classmate, Jim McCabe, who decided to zoom in a little closer to the moon.

10600452_1438923096396163_1820215587162587821_n-1

Left: Marie’s sample painting for the evening
Right: Jim’s interpretation of the subject

I enjoyed the opportunity to work with a new medium (acrylics), to see how Marie was able to break down the painting into simple steps, and to discover what I could do.  I was able to practice painting without any worry about when I might get to practice again, thanks to a meaningful starting and ending point during an evening I can commit to one month at a time.  I enjoyed food and wine with friends, new and old, while listening to good music.  The energy of the room that evening was pretty magical.

August Paint Night

The October paint night is already sold out, but there are more scheduled. Not available evenings? ACAC is also offering some daytime offerings.  So grab some friends, or come out for a solo-adventure to meet new friends.  Set aside some time one evening or afternoon to let your inner-Picasso come out to play.

Upcoming classes are:

Thursday, November 6 from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.

Thursday, December 4 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.

Monday, December 8 from 1:00 to 3:30 p.m.

All classes are held at the ACAC Education Center on 125 S. Washington Street, Gettysburg.  You can register for the November class here or call (717) 334-5006 for more information.  Links to register online for December should be available soon.  Cost for the class is $36.

This is the lovely painting being offered for the December afternoon class, taught by Marti Yeager:

 Moon-at-SunsetHope to see you there!

 

Stoneware Fish, Monkey Muffins and More Summer Highlights

Posted on: September 11th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks
Edible Art Campers

Edible Art Campers

“She said she loved camp everyday!” That is just one of the dozens of rave reviews pouring into our office, in the wake of the ACAC Summer Arts Camp schedule. Now that school is back in session, we miss the excitement and creativity sparked by children dancing and skipping through our building, making all kinds of colorful projects—some of them even edible, and seeing their fantastic imaginations at work. We hope we sparked a life-long appreciation of the arts, and we hope they return for After School Classes and/or next year’s Summer Arts Camps.

Sewing Camp!

Sewing Camp!

Until then, we are thankful for much positive feedback and want to share a few reviews:

  • Mr. Jack is wonderful. Kind and patient! Great instructor!
  • I am impressed with the quantity, variety, and quality of projects. She liked the drawing projects best.
  • This was an amazing camp and it definitely met all my expectations.
  • End of class presentation was excellent.
  • Mr. Gilmore was an excellent instructor and the class project was enjoyed by my son.
  • They came home talking about all the great things they learned each day!
  • The best (comment) is “look what I can do!”
  • Enjoyable experience – nice that parents/siblings can have some tasty treats too.
  • “I love it Mom! The teachers are so nice. We make great food!”
Learn to Play Guitar Camp

Learn to Play Guitar Camp

Fun with Impressionism Camp

Fun with Impressionism Camp

On the questionnaires, parents were asked to rate their child(ren)’s arts camps on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the highest rating. When we tallied the results, we found that:

  • More than 8 in 10 parents gave us a rating of “5.”
  • 95% of all parents rated our camps as being either a “4” or “5.”
  • For enjoyment of projects, parents’ average rating was 4.86
  • Parents’ average rating of summer arts camp teachers was 4.89
  • Did the class meet your expectation? Parents’ average rating was 4.77.
Photo Camp project!

Photo Camp project!

Fun with Weaving Camp

Fun with Weaving Camp

What did your child enjoy most? Here are just a sampling of the happy answers:

  • Making stoneware fish
  • Rolling the dough for monkey muffins
  • Using the big loom
  • I liked making new friends
  • The watermelon cake
  • Working with the candy clay
  • Creating comic book
  • Making a mug
  • Learning how to make pottery on wheel. Lots of fun!
  • Making the apron
  • Making the bracelets
  • Having a nice teacher
Preschoolers work on their Hungry Caterpillar books

Campers work on their Hungry Caterpillar books

What projects were your child’s favorites? When asked this question, we received more than 100 different answers. So, we got creative and made a piece of “word art” to demonstrate the answers! The larger words were responses we received multiple times. Enjoy!

Fave Art Projects Summer 2014

 

Are you inspired? Click here for our current Class Schedule including all Adult Classes, Preschool Classes and After School Classes. And enjoy a few more summer memories, below:

10615356_715752601794864_7911232806452415876_n

Under the Sea Camp

10583991_715289191841205_7643206375691788944_n

Dance Camp!

10547705_706135819423209_5642303148644259444_n

Comic Book Camp

10534503_706609969375794_8302637457790339995_n

Cooking Extravaganza campers enjoy their soft pretzels

10314542_704359492934175_469695804609481732_n

Edible art creations!

10307387_706952066008251_5796710753150182254_n

Cooking Extravaganza Camp

 

Have I Got a Story for You!! Storytelling and More Camp

Have I Got a Story for You!! Storytelling and More Camp

10304979_711855192184605_7028190561816029931_n

Sewing is Fun Camp

Fall Fiesta Mixes Fun with Fundraiser

Posted on: August 21st, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

Four things that Judy Pyle is most passionate about include the arts, parties, people and pies. (More on her pies, in a moment….) The longtime ACAC supporter is throwing one of her biggest parties in about a month—inviting the public to enjoy her Fall Fiesta—and all to benefit the arts council.

“This is the 11th annual Fall Fiesta,” Pyle explains. “Not only is it a fundraiser for the arts council, but it’s also a great way to spend a Friday evening after work.”

Set for Friday, September 26 from 5-8 pm, the Fiesta celebrates the first Friday of fall with a Mexican themed supper and drinks. Pyle says tacos are a staple of the menu—with endless possibilities for combinations of fillings—as well as traditional Mexican rice, beans, guacamole, plenty of salsa and chips, and more. Plenty of lively conversation, plus music by the Klinger McFry Band will add to the festive atmosphere.

The setting is Pyle’s meticulously-maintained grounds and gardens, surrounding her Gettysburg home, featuring tents and spacious seating areas. How fitting that attendees will be heading “south of the border” onto South Howard Avenue for her Fiesta—she laughingly refers to her address as “Gettysburg’s SoHo.”

Judy Pyle's beautifully-maintained gardens

Judy Pyle’s beautifully-maintained gardens

The Fall Fiesta also includes a silent auction featuring one-of-a-kind art and exclusive items. She says prizes in the past have included incredible art as well as trips such as the chance to go sailing on the Chesapeake Bay. As a jewelry artist, Pyle always contributes a pair of her hand-crafted silver earrings.

What drives Pyle’s love of the arts and determination to give back to the arts community?

“I taught art for 35 years,” she says, “So I know how important the arts are to life, to the community, to people who want their children to grow and go onto college. Art is a language, a problem-solving exercise—it expands minds. And the ACAC is all-inclusive in our community.”

Pyle says she’s been an arts council member since the organization’s inception, more than 20 years ago. She’s thrilled to host the Fall Fiesta for the 11th year, as a way to support the non-profit ACAC and keep the arts flourishing throughout Adams County.

RSVP for the Fall Fiesta today:

  • $25 per person
  • Requested by September 24
  • Can be made online (click here) or in person at the arts council, 125 S. Washington Street, Gettysburg
  • Admission at the door will be $30
  • Event-goers must be at least 21

You will also see Pyle’s name among the many talented instructors teaching adult classes at the arts council this fall. And here’s where her love of pies comes in…

Judy's apple crumb pie... fresh from the oven

Judy’s apple crumb pie… fresh from the oven

“Not everybody knows how to make pies,” Pyle explains. “I grew up at the elbow of both of my grandmothers and it was great training for me, learning how to make pies. They were known for their pies, so I’m sharing their recipes through my classes offered at the arts council.”

You’re welcome to join Pyle, not only for the Fall Fiesta, but for her upcoming classes as well:

My Grandmothers’ Pies : Peach  - Thursday, August 21, 6:00-8:30 pm

Members of the class will be greeted by the aroma of baking pies as they enter the state-of-the-art chef’s kitchen.  Learn how to make the unbeatable combination of flaky dough and rich peach filling from local artisan and pie baker, Judy Pyle.  Learn tips on how to put a crust together, make it, roll it out, ready for the pie pan and the luscious filling to follow.  Your pie will be ready to bake or freeze when you leave.  Enjoy a pie that’s ready to be shared after instruction!  Judy Pyle  $38 (members $35) Register thru Paypal

Block Printing-Making Workshop – Saturdays, October 11-18, 10:00 am -3:00 pm

Learn how to make block prints using classic techniques.  While the process is simple, the lino print can be as subtle and simple, or as intricate as the artist wants.  Bring along ideas to the first class, and use as a catalyst to produce new and exciting artwork!  Materials provided. Judy Pyle and Andrea Theisson   $139 (members $126) Register thru Paypal

My Grandmothers’ Pies - Apple: Thursday, October 16, 6:00-8:30 pm

Members of the class will be greeted by the aroma of baking pies as they enter the state-of-the-art chef’s kitchen.  Learn how to make the unbeatable combination of flaky dough and rich filling from local artisan and pie baker, Judy Pyle.  Learn tips on how to put a crust together, make it, roll it out, ready for the pie pan and the luscious filling to follow.  Your pie will be ready to bake or freeze when you leave.  Enjoy a pie that’s ready to be shared after instruction! Judy Pyle  $38 (members $35) Register thru Paypal

 

Volunteering at the Adams County Arts Council

Posted on: August 13th, 2014 by acac

Cora Koser

Pictured left to right – Emily Hoponick (Instructor), Cora Koser, Mia Maloney(Intern from The School of Art Institute of Chicago) & Caroline Johnson (Intern from Millersville University)

By Cora Koser

I myself have been volunteering since I was nine.  Currently, I’m fourteen years old and have spent two of my years volunteering at the Adams County Arts Council.  The ACAC has been the happiest and welcoming environment to be working in.  I have had many different chances to meet all kinds of people that live in our community.  The many varieties of instructors makes each and every one camp special and unique.  All of the campers just give me a big fat smile on my face when I see their creativity flowing out.  Also, the students have taught me just as much as the instructors would’ve.  One of my favorite camps to help out in is the cooking camps.  The cooking camps get the campers really involved and interested in what they are doing.  I have also had lots of fun in many different art classes, one especially that ended with a “dance party.” It was so fun to watch the students show their moves to the song “What does the Fox say?”  As me being an insider, I can tell you that the the Adams County Arts Council is just the best place to have your kids (or maybe yourself) involved in the many activities offered.

 

 

Get to Know the 19-Year Old Stars of “Tarzan”

Posted on: July 28th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

One More Weekend of Upcoming Performances: August 1-3 at the Eichelberger 

IMG_8587web

Dakota Haines, 19, of York, stars in Acts of Kindness Theatre Company’s summer production, Tarzan the Stage Musical, coming to Hanover’s Eichelberger Theatre, 195 Stock Street, for a second weekend on August 1, 2, and 3. The show is based upon the beloved character in Disney’s 1999 film and Edgar Rice Burrough’s classic book Tarzan of the Apes.

Tarzan and Jane, played by Dakota Haines of York and Zoe Wildasin of Hanover lead an impressive regional cast assembled for Tarzan® the Stage Musical, the featured 2014 summer production by Acts of Kindness (AOK) Theatre Company with proceeds funneled directly back into the community via non-profit donations.

Performances are slated for Hanover’s Eichelberger Performing Arts Center on July 25, 26 and 27; and August 1, 2, and 3. Acts of Kindness Director Rene Staub says Tarzan fits the bill as the perfect show to celebrate the theatre company’s 10th anniversary show. “It’s a classic story, but the musical is done in a unique way. The show will make kids in the audience laugh, but adults will laugh at things that are over the kids’ heads. Disney does a great job with that—there’s something for everyone in this show.”

Heading up the 40-plus-member cast is York’s 19-year old Dakota Haines as Tarzan. Haines, a 2013 graduate of Dallastown Area High School, is a sophomore at Penn State University who will be auditioning for the school’s prestigious musical theatre program in the fall.

“Tarzan is a challenging role, but also a lot of fun,” Haines says. “To be acting very ridiculous and ape-like on stage and still have family, friends and the local community come out to support me… it’s very endearing,” he laughs.

Haines says music has always been a part of his life, nurtured by experiences with concert and symphonic band, as well as marching with the drum line, singing with York County Junior and Senior Honors Choir, and snagging leading roles in Dallastown High School’s musicals such as Legally Blonde and Hairspray. He is currently a member of an a cappella group as well as the acclaimed Blue Band at Penn State.

Tarzan is Haines’ first performance with AOK Theatre Company, unlike his co-star Zoe Wildasin, also 19, whose role as Jane marks her ninth consecutive summer show with AOK. She lists Titanic, CATS and Hairspray as some of her favorite past shows with AOK. But playing the role of Jane in Tarzan offers Wildasin the opportunity to show AOK’s audience how she has matured over the years.

IMG_8604web

Hanover’s Zoe Wildasin, 19, plays the role of Jane in Acts of Kindness Theatre Company’s summer production, Tarzan the Stage Musical, coming to Hanover’s Eichelberger Theatre, 195 Stock Street, for a second weekend, August 1, 2, and 3. The Spring Grove graduate is marking her ninth summer production with AOK.

“It’s a fun part because Jane is very mature,” Wildasin explains. “But at the same time, she’s also inquisitive which makes her youthful.”

A 2013 graduate of Spring Grove High School, Wildasin is currently a sophomore at Chicago’s DePaul University, majoring in public relations/advertising with a minor in theatre studies. She says being involved in nine of the ten past AOK productions gives her a unique perspective.

“Everyone involved in the show is a volunteer,” she says. “It’s a great group of people giving a lot of hard work and time. But from the audience’s perspective, it looks like a professional company and every year there’s a greater quality to the show. People expect more from us every year, and hopefully this year with Tarzan we’ll deliver again.”

Background:

Based upon Edgar Rice Burrough’s book Tarzan of the Apes and the 1999 smash-hit Disney animated film, Tarzan tells the story of an infant boy orphaned on the shores of West Africa. Taken in and raised by a tribe of gorillas, the young boy strives for acceptance by his ape father while grappling with his uniqueness. When a human expedition enters their territory, Tarzan—now a man—encounters strangers like himself for the first time.

Proceeds:

Tarzan proceeds benefit Addy’s Team (Cystic Fibrosis), as well as the non-profit Adams County Arts Council, whose mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. Executive Director Chris Glatfelter says proceeds from AOK’s summer shows are some of the largest contributions the arts council receives annually.

Tickets:

Contact the Eichelberger Box Office, 195 Stock Street, Hanover, Monday-Friday, 10 am-2 pm, or online anytime at www.theeich.org, or by calling the box office at 717-637-7086. Advance tickets are $12 for students/children and $16 for adults. Premium seating is also available for $19. On performance days, ticket prices are $2 more. A group rate of $12 per ticket applies to groups of 15 or more attending the same performance.

For more information: See www.aoktheatre.com.

 

Adventures in Abstract Art

Posted on: July 22nd, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Robyn Warren - DaveLisa VinoOpportunities for adventure are endless with abstract art.  Whether you claim to “like it” or not, abstract art invites an audience to participate in the creative process.  Because the pieces often do not represent identifiable objects, viewers are taken on an adventure of the senses, drawing on individual experiences and emotions: Does that shade of purple evoke the soft color and smell of flowers in your grandmother’s garden?  Do those undulating blues remind you of a trip to the beach with a long-lost love, making you melancholy? Or do they remind you of a vacation you took last week with a new love, evoking a sensation of bursting happiness?  Whatever you are feeling, the person standing next to you may be simultaneously on a different, but equally relevant emotional adventure.

This phenomenon only allows the adventure to continue.  Once we have processed our own feelings about a piece, we can discuss our impressions and feelings with a friend… or a stranger.  Will you bond over the experience of the piece with the person next to you, or will you engage in a debate, so moved are you by the feelings that no other interpretation seems possible?

Continuing the adventure still, we can imagine the motives of the artists who created the pieces.  Is Arlyn Pettingell’s “Night Ocean” a peaceful sea or a harrowing one? Is there a storm threatening a lovely sky, or are the soft yellows and pinks glimmers of the calm that follows the storm?Pettingell

If you would like to find out, join us for the ACAC’s Abstract Show adventure, which peaks on Friday, August 1 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. with a First Friday reception at the Adams County Arts Council’s Education Center, 125 South Washington Street, Gettysburg, PA, and will continue throughout the month of August.  The show offers a diverse range of style and subject matter in a variety of media, including paintings, photography, sculpture, and mixed media.  Artists will be in attendance at the reception to discuss their work, and all pieces are for sale.

Handshaw

 

AOK’s 10th Anniversary Show, TARZAN, “Flies” to New Heights

Posted on: July 21st, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

Acts of Kindness Theatre Company Returns July 25-27; August 1- 3              

Special effects, acrobatics and even flying stunts, are being perfected in the days leading up to performances of Tarzan® the Stage Musical, the featured 2014 summer production by Acts of Kindness (AOK) Theatre Company, presenting regional talent ranging in age from 6-60+ and benefitting the non-profit Adams County Arts Council.

Performances are slated for Hanover’s Eichelberger Performing Arts Center on July 25, 26 and 27; and August 1, 2, and 3. AOK Director Rene Staub says Tarzan, the company’s banner 10th anniversary show, is sure to dazzle audiences with its innovative choreography.

“Acrobatics and dancing are central to the story of Tarzan,” Staub explains. “It’s a primal body language that’s very organic. The cast’s movements are very believable—(choreographer) Dawn Glass has done a great job with that.”

Glass, Artistic Director at Gettysburg’s Vibe Performing Arts Studio, says a total of 15 cast members will be “flying” during the performances.

“We are working with one of the biggest flying companies in the U.S. to install the rigging and train us. They ‘fly’ people in LA, in movies, and they tell us that what we’re doing in Tarzan right here in Hanover is typically done in the Broadway show,” according to Glass.

“Different apparatus will help the actors fly, flip and jump out of trees,” she explains. “Some are cables installed straight down from the ceiling, while some are like bungees with someone in the wings doing the controlling. There will also be three pendulums with movement like grandfather clock pendulums, so that Tarzan and the dancers can swing from vine to vine. Everything is completely customized to each of our actors’ and dancers’ height and weight.”

Simple movements on stage are actually anything but simple—the cast has spent weeks researching and practicing the movement of apes. “We have studied everything from Zoo Life videos to Planet of the Apes and YouTube videos,” Glass says. “It’s been amazing to watch the cast transform—their movements look so natural now. Audiences are going to forget there are actually humans inside the costumes.”

Dakota Haines, 19, of York, playing the lead role of Tarzan, works on ape-like movements on stage with Donovan Yaukey of Shippensburg, who plays “young Tarzan,” in this summer’s Acts of Kindness Theatre Company’s Tarzan the Stage Musical

Dakota Haines, 19, of York, playing the lead role of Tarzan, works on ape-like movements on stage with Donovan Yaukey of Shippensburg, who plays “young Tarzan,” in this summer’s Acts of Kindness Theatre Company’s Tarzan the Stage Musical

This 10th anniversary show is also musically challenging. “The orchestra features 12 local musicians,” according to musical director Brian Buterbaugh. “However, the complex African beats require us to have five drummers, instead of two as we normally have.”

“Musical highlights certainly include Phil Collins’ Grammy Award-winning song ‘You’ll Be in My Heart’ which everyone will recognize and is beautifully orchestrated,” says Buterbaugh. “There are several big chorus numbers with everyone on stage, spectacles for both the eyes and ears.”

Background:

Based upon Edgar Rice Burrough’s book Tarzan of the Apes and the 1999 smash-hit Disney animated film, Tarzan tells the story of an infant boy orphaned on the shores of West Africa. Taken in and raised by a tribe of gorillas, the young boy strives for acceptance by his ape father while grappling with his uniqueness. When a human expedition enters their territory, Tarzan—now a man—encounters strangers like himself for the first time.

Starring:

Heading up the 40-plus-member cast is York’s 19-year old Dakota Haines as Tarzan and Hanover’s 19-year old Zoe Wildasin as Jane. Haines, a graduate of Dallastown Area High School, is currently a student at Penn State University; Wildasin is a graduate of Spring Grove Area High School who attends Chicago’s DePaul University.

Proceeds:

Tarzan proceeds benefit Addy’s Team (Cystic Fibrosis), as well as the non-profit Adams County Arts Council, whose mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. Executive Director Chris Glatfelter says proceeds from AOK’s summer shows are some of the largest contributions the arts council receives annually.

Tickets:

Contact the Eichelberger Box Office, 195 Stock Street, Hanover, Monday-Friday, 10 am-2 pm, or online anytime at www.theeich.org, or by calling the box office at 717-637-7086. Advance tickets are $12 for students/children and $16 for adults. Premium seating is also available for $19. On performance days, ticket prices are $2 more. A group rate of $12 per ticket applies to groups of 15 or more attending the same performance.

For a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the show, click here for our Facebook photo album!

Acrobatic “Tarzan the Stage Musical” Swings into Eichelberger Theatre

Posted on: July 10th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

Performances Slated for July 25, 26, 27; August 1, 2, 3 

Tarzan the Stage Musical - Logo

Described as “acrobatic, innovative, entertaining and family-oriented,” Tarzan® the Stage Musical is the featured 2014 summer production by Acts of Kindness (AOK) Theatre Company, presenting regional talent ranging in age from 6-60+ and benefitting the non-profit Adams County Arts Council.

Performances are slated for Hanover’s Eichelberger Performing Arts Center on July 25, 26 and 27; and August 1, 2, and 3. Rene Staub returns as show director; his wife Jessica Staub returns production coordinator. Together, the pair heads up Acts of Kindness Theatre Company, which formed ten years ago in order to present a quality summer production that would also give back to regional nonprofit organizations such as the arts council.

“For the 10th anniversary show, we were looking for something celebratory and family-oriented from Disney,” explains Rene Staub. “Since Tarzan is a fairly new release to community theatre, it allows us to offer something fresh and extremely innovative to the area audience.”

“The story of Tarzan will pull at the audience’s heartstrings, and the show overall will dazzle them—through effects, acrobatics—with cast members swinging from vine to vine, innovative dancing, beautifully lush sets, and moving music by Phil Collins including the Grammy Award-winning song ‘You’ll Be in My Heart.’ It’s going to be a full experience.”

PhilCollins

(Click here for “You’ll Be in My Heart” on YouTube)

Based upon Edgar Rice Burrough’s book Tarzan of the Apes and the 1999 smash-hit Disney animated film, Tarzan tells the story of an infant boy orphaned on the shores of West Africa. Taken in and raised by a tribe of gorillas, the young boy strives for acceptance by his ape father while grappling with his uniqueness. When a human expedition enters their territory, Tarzan—now a man—encounters strangers like himself for the first time.

Dakota Haines as Tarzan FB

Dakota Haines, 19, of York, stars in Acts of Kindness Theatre Company’s summer production, Tarzan the Stage Musical.

Heading up the 40-plus-member cast is York’s 19-year old Dakota Haines as Tarzan. Haines, a graduate of Dallastown Area High School, is currently a student at Penn State University. Dawn Glass of Gettysburg’s Vibe Performing Arts Studio is show choreographer.

The producers are quick to point out that it takes talent of all ages to create a successful production. “I think some of the most valuable performing experiences occur when kids, teens and adults perform side by side,” says Jessica Staub. “That happens on stage, as well as backstage and in our orchestra. It’s truly a team effort.”

AOK’s productions typically attract an audience ranging between 2,500 and 4,000 over the two weekend-run. Organizers project Tarzan will be on the high end of that range due to two main factors—Tarzan’s wide appeal, and a switch to the professional grade venue, Hanover’s Eichelberger Performing Arts Center. Previous shows were held at New Oxford High School, and while organizers continue to enjoy a wonderful relationship with the school, the district’s decreased summer staffing would not support AOK’s 2014 show.

Tarzan proceeds benefit the non-profit ACAC, whose mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. Executive Director Chris Glatfelter says proceeds from AOK’s summer shows are some of the largest contributions the arts council receives annually.

“Grateful does not even begin to describe how we, as a staff and board, feel every year when we partner with Acts of Kindness Theatre Company,” Glatfelter says. “Vital arts education faces severe cuts in our public schools, and we strive to fill this gap by offering quality arts instruction, bringing enriching arts performances to public schools and the community, and instilling an appreciation for the arts among audiences of all ages. It is a challenge, especially economically, but with generous support such as that from AOK, we continue to meet our mission.”

Tickets to Tarzan can be obtained through the Eichelberger Box Office, 195 Stock Street, Hanover, Monday-Friday, 10 am-2 pm, or online anytime at www.theeich.org, or by calling the box office at 717-637-7086. Advance tickets are $12 for students/children and $16 for adults. Premium seating is also available for $19. On performance days, ticket prices are $2 more. A group rate of $12 per ticket applies to groups of 15 or more attending the same performance.

Hope to see you at the show! 

 

Artist Spotlight: Ted Scarpino

Posted on: July 8th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks
IMG_6746r

Ted Scarpino proudly wears a shirt given to him by his granddaughter

Ted Scarpino: Evolving from Photography to iPhoneography (originally published by Handmade in PA, blog of the PA Guild of Craftsmen)

Photography, at its very core, is a merging of art and science. And you could say that photographer Ted Scarpino was truly born into both fields, since his mother was an art teacher and his father taught science. The family’s home even included a dark room in the basement.

While science and technology drew him to a career as an electrical engineer, Scarpino also dabbled in photography his entire life. In his native New York state, he developed a thriving wedding photography business on the side, was active in several camera clubs, and earned accolades in photo competitions with the Professional Photographers of America. All the while, he grew and adjusted to technology—embracing the switch to digital photography and applying new techniques to his photos via Photoshop.

“Along the Lake,” taken in 2007 in the Adirondacks. This photo was accepted into the PPA’s permanent loan collection.

“Along the Lake,” taken in 2007 in the Adirondacks. This photo was accepted into the PPA’s permanent loan collection.

“Rolling Hills,” another Scarpino photo accepted into the PPA’s loan collection, was taken from a hot air balloon. This photo was also juried into the prestigious “Art of the State” exhibit, Harrisburg.

“Rolling Hills,” another Scarpino photo accepted into the PPA’s loan collection, was taken from a hot air balloon. This photo was also juried into the prestigious “Art of the State” exhibit, Harrisburg.

Today, enjoying retirement and relocated to Gettysburg, PA, Scarpino continues to explore the balance of science and art known as photography, but through a new lens—the iPhone. “Three years ago, I got my first iPhone. It’s exciting to be able to find places to eat, to use maps and many other features right at my fingertips,” he explains, “But the thing I was the most excited about was the camera.”

“You can’t go anywhere today—New York City, DC, even the Gettysburg Battlefield, without seeing people taking pictures with their phones.”

“iPhoneography” has kept this veteran photography on his toes. Scarpino is intrigued by the accessories and apps that make quality photos possible with a phone so unbelievably small that it fits into his pocket. Although some photographers feel threatened by, or look down upon iPhoneography, Scarpino has a different view. “I think (iPhones) could actually be making photography more accessible. There are so many artistic uses of the iPhone… it’s certainly given photography a new language. There’s a powerful computer in every camera and is a great merging of the two fields—art and science.”

“Arrival of the Prophet – Union Station, Chicago.” Scarpino says this is “personally one of my favorite images of all time.” Taken with an iPhone using the Hipstamatic app, Salvador lens.

“Arrival of the Prophet – Union Station, Chicago.” Scarpino says this is “personally one of my favorite images of all time.” Taken with an iPhone using the Hipstamatic app, Salvador lens.

The panoramic “Rainbow over Orchard Road,” captures a chance encounter Scarpino had with a rainbow while walking his dog. His iPhone was the only camera he had with him–thank goodness!

The panoramic “Rainbow over Orchard Road,” captures a chance encounter Scarpino had with a rainbow while walking his dog. His iPhone was the only camera he had with him–thank goodness!

Scarpino regularly shares his knowledge of iPhoneography via classes at the Adams County Arts Council located in Gettysburg. His iPhoneography classes are aimed at helping participants “discover how to maximize a smart phone’s photographic potential.”

His photography work is exhibited and for sale at Gallery 30, Gettysburg, and Scarpino enjoys entering juried art exhibits such as the Adams County Arts Council’s Juried Art Exhibition and the Art of the State at Harrisburg’s State Museum of Pennsylvania. In 2010, his piece “Rolling Hills” was juried into the Art of the State exhibit, about 40 years after his mother had a fused glass piece accepted into this pinnacle of Pennsylvania exhibits. Still following in both his mother and father’s footsteps…

To contact Ted Scarpino: 717-677-4192

“And the Water Whispers to Me,” aptly titled by Scarpino’s sister. Standing on a bridge overlooking the Susquehanna in Cooperstown, NY, Scarpino captured this shot of the very last man in a canoe race. “He was wearing a red hat, with a beautiful wake behind him, with the tree branches as a frame.”

“And the Water Whispers to Me,” aptly titled by Scarpino’s sister. Standing on a bridge overlooking the Susquehanna in Cooperstown, NY, Scarpino captured this shot of the very last man in a canoe race. “He was wearing a red hat, with a beautiful wake behind him, with the tree branches as a frame.”

 

“Red Barn on Yellow Hill,” an Adams County landscape. Scarpino says he finds orchards and farmlands fascinating in every season, especially when straight lines are found on rolling hills.

“Red Barn on Yellow Hill,” an Adams County landscape. Scarpino says he finds orchards and farmlands fascinating in every season, especially when straight lines are found on rolling hills.

 

 

 

Beat the “Dog Days of Summer” with an Art Camp for Kids

Posted on: July 2nd, 2014 by Karen Hendricks
Image courtesy of Gualberto107 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Gualberto107 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

“The Dog Days of Summer”—approximately July 3 through August 11—is known as the hottest, most uncomfortable period of summer. This sultry, humid time period is named for the movement of Sirius, the dog star, as it aligns with the sun in the summer night sky.

Parents usually know when the Dog Days of Summer hit too… it’s the same time period when the phrase “I’m bored” starts to strike their households. But thankfully the ACAC has a full lineup of summer boredom-busting arts camps to help families survive the Dog Days of Summer—and beyond!

Here are a few highlights:

Ballerinas & Bears Returns, (ages 3-5), July 7-11, 9:00-11:00 am    

If you’re a beginner ballerina or dancer, this fun-filled class is for you and if you’re returning for a second time, new music and moves provided!  You’ll learn the elements of ballet and creative movement, wear your favorite costumes, and we’ll have a dancing teddy bear party and performance at the end of the week.  Elizabeth Spicer $90 (member $83) Ballerina& Bears Returns Registration

Hungry, Hungry Caterpillar, (ages 6-8), July 7-11, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Love the colorful collages Eric Carle uses to illustrate his picture books?  Learn to paint, cut, & assemble paper to make stunning collages of your own!  Then you’ll illustrate your own book.  Create something new every day and assemble your book at the end of the week to share at our Arty Party! Dawn Magee $155 (member $145) Hungry, Hungry Registration

Eric Carle

Project Runway:  Time Travel Fashion, (ages 10-14), July 7-11, 1:00-4:00 pm 

Explore the fascinating evolution of women’s fashion.  Each day you’ll create a fun fashion object from a different period in history using fabric, found objects, embellishments – and your imagination!  Our journey through fashion will begin with the Victorian Era and travel to the present day.  You’ll create a decorative fan, a flapper’s headband, a wrap, and together the group will design a piece inspired by a famous woman!  End the week with a fashion show featuring your own handmade creations!  Debbie Westmoreland $155 (member $145) Project Runway Registration

Fun with Weaving, (ages 9-11) – July 14-18, 9:00-12:00 noon    (max. 10 students)

Weaving is really fun and easy to do!  Begin your weaving experiences by using simple, inexpensive looms and materials.  Learn basic weaving techniques, designs and patterning with a variety of colored and textured yarns to create your own unique woven treasures.  Joh Ricci  $155 (member $145) Fun with Weaving Registration

Building 3D (ages 11-14), July 14-18, 10:00 am-1:00 pm

What’s 3D?  3D is art that’s not flat.  If you love working with your hands, here’s your opportunity to be a sculptor!  Construct a 3D sculpture using clay that’s carved and ready to hang on a wall.  Make a clay box, a wire sculpture influenced by a Calder mobile or a sculpture of your choosing exploring various media.  The materials are yours to shape.   Sally Becker $155 (members $145) Building 3D Registration

Sweet Treat Baking & Edible Art, (ages 9-14), July 14-18, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (Max of 10 students)

Experience just how creative baking and decorating desserts can be!  You’ll learn a variety of tricks for expressing your creativity in the kitchen – like drawing chocolate flowers when decorating a cake, making and decorating small fondant cakes, building a planter out of an ice cream cone – even making sculptures with chocolate and candy clay.  Yummy fun!   Lori Nelson  $155 (member $145) Sweet Treat Registration

Image courtesy of zole4 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of zole4 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Super Heroes Comic Book Camp!  (ages 8-11) July 21-25, 9:00-12:00 p.m.

Create your own unique characters as you develop your own super heroes!  Learn how to develop the dynamics of the face, the art of exaggeration and body construction.  Create your own costume designs as well as simple perspectives to create a cityscape.  This camp is great for artists who’d like to develop their drawing skills while using their imagination. Stanley Gilmore  $155 (members $150) Super Heros Registration

Express Yourself Through Impressionist Art! (ages 8-11) July 21-25, 1:00-4:00 p.m.

Learn about famous Impressionist artists and this fascinating art movement.  Practice pointillism like Seurat.  Experiment with pastels like Degas.  Create fun Matisse-inspired collages using mixed media.  Paint like artists Monet and Cezanne.  Gather a deeper understanding of this magical Paris-based art movement while uncovering your own artistic talents. Melissa Jackson  $155 (member $145) Impressionist Registration

Cooking Extravaganza! (ages 10-14) July 21-25, 9:00-12:00 noon

Do you love food?  Spend a week with us crafting delectable recipes that are tasty, nutritious and fun to make! You’ll make banana berry smoothies, fresh salsa, tostadas and pitas with the fixings, tuna mac and cheese, and lasagna roll-ups for yourself, friends, and family!  Get cooking tips from an experienced instructor while learning all about the equipment, utensils and   kitchen safety! Linda Fauth  $158 (members $148) Cooking Extravaganza Registration

Fun Behind the Lens! (ages 11 & Up), July 28-August 1 , 1:00-4:00 p.m. 

Do you love to look at life through a camera lens?  This camp is for you!  You’ll learn everything you need to know to take great photos, experiment with composition and expand the boundaries of your camera by using still subjects and class members as models.  Create and print your favorite shots from the week as well as an 11” by 14” collage of favorite images taken by the class.  Remember to bring your camera to class! Bert Danielson  $150 (members $140) Fun Behind the Lens!  Registration

 

 

Sizzling Hot Trend in the Arts: On Fire at the ACAC

Posted on: June 26th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks
"Mandala" - created at an ACAC Paint & Wine Night

“Mandala” – created at an ACAC Paint & Wine Night

It’s a hot trend sweeping the nation, bringing people together over art and wine, and the Adams County Arts Council is on top of it! What is this craze?

Paint & Wine Night!

Think of it as a “night out,” but with a creative twist. Attendees can round up friends or family members, sign up at the ACAC, and BYOB. ACAC instructors Marie Smith or Lisa Harman lead the way, providing all art supplies and complete, step-by-step instructions. By the end of the evening, each attendee has completed a piece of artwork that can be hung in his/her home. What a great remembrance of a fun evening. Absolutely no experience is necessary.

Unique: Another version of the "Mandala" design

Unique: Another version of the “Mandala” design

Held approximately once a month at the ACAC, Paint & Wine Nights have quickly become very popular. In fact, most previous Paint & Wine Nights have filled to capacity and sold out! The next one will be held on Thursday, July 10 from 6-8 pm.

The July 2014 Paint Night theme!

The July 2014 Paint Night theme!

“Paint Nights are helping people get in touch with their creative side, while having a lot of fun,” explains Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator.

She even developed a very special, customized Paint Night recently. A group of Gettysburg-area women, rallying around one of their friends—fighting her second round of breast cancer, asked Heiges to develop a symbolic Paint & Wine Night. They wanted the paintings created to serve as a keepsake and reminder of the women’s strong ties, support and friendship. Wendy developed symbols for the women to paint, such as the oak tree, known for its strength and fortitude. Sand, water and sky served as a backdrop to remind the women of their friend’s favorite place on earth—the beach.

The Oasis Tree: A symbol of friendship among this circle of friends

The Oasis Tree: A symbol of friendship among this circle of friends

“It was an extremely meaningful evening,” Heiges explains. “We titled the theme ‘The Oasis Tree’ with each friend painting a personal symbol or signature on the honoree’s painting.  The friends considered their own ‘Oasis Tree’ a keepsake, documented with ‘Certificate of Authenticity’ as a memento of the aptly named ‘Laugh, Paint & Sip Night’ event.”

It is said that the arts can transcend all language barriers… Music and art especially, can express what words cannot. What better way to enjoy an evening together, celebrate a friendship, have fun with a sister, bond with your spouse, etc? And don’t forget to BYOB (or BYOW—Bring Your Own Wine)! Once the wine is flowing, so does the creativity!

Click here to sign up for the July 10 Paint & Wine Night, and look for future Paint & Wine Nights on the ACAC Class Schedule.

Sunflower Memories: captured on canvas as an ACAC Paint & Wine Night

Sunflower Memories: captured on canvas as an ACAC Paint & Wine Night

 

Fall Splendor: a sparkling reminder of an evening at the ACAC

Fall Splendor: a sparkling reminder of an evening at the ACAC

 

Artist Spotlight: Carol Herren Foerster

Posted on: June 23rd, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

CarolAdams County Arts Council member Carol Herren Foerster has been sharing her drawings in Adams County for more than 25 years, but she recently recommitted herself to “really doing her art.”

Unexpected family obligations that arose earlier in her career made it impossible for Carol to finish her teaching certification, despite finishing a Bachelor’s degree in art.  Later, a work-related injury left her legally disabled with Radial Tunnel Syndrome in her right arm.  Carol says it’s no coincidence that drawing is the one activity that doesn’t aggravate the disorder.  The fine detail of her work is further evidence that drawing is what she is called to do.

Carol’s first priority has always been her family. Though her two children and four step-children are now grown, her house still often bustles with the sounds of little people – her grandchildren – for whom she cares while their parents are working.  As a younger mom, she worked odd jobs here and there, squeezing in time to draw when she could.  Since her own children are now grown, she is enjoying the freedom to pursue her drawing more seriously, particularly since the youngest grandchild is out of diapers.

amanda

This piece will be on display as part of the Art of the State Show at the State Museum of Harrisburg until September 2014.

She also credits a sense of artistic liberation to Facebook and social media.  Since posting her work on Facebook, the overwhelmingly positive responses have allowed her to let go of self-imposed angst and inhibition surrounding her abilities as an artist. Her confidence has snowballed over the past few years, during which she has not only improved her skills, but she has also entered more shows and contests, won a few awards, and most recently, she received a letter from Pennsylvania Senator Richard Alloway, III congratulating her on a spot in the Art of the State Show at the State Museum of Pennsylvania in Harrisburg, which began Saturday, June 22 and continues through September. She also has work showing at the Salmagundi Club in New York City this summer. Because she practices her art and submits her work without expectation or worry, the notifications of awards and acceptances like these feel like happy surprises.

When asked about her plans for the future, Carol says, “I’m no longer taking commissions. I just draw what I want.” An earlier plan to draw a series of women’s portraits evolved into a beautiful, eclectic collection of subjects that were on display at the ACAC Education Center last May.  She looks forward to another show at ACAC in April of 2015.  To prepare for that show and other upcoming events, Carol says she will just “go with the flow and follow inspiration.”  It’s a tactic that has been serving her well so far.

captured

This piece will be featured for the summer at the Salmagundi Club, 47 Fifth Ave., New York NY.

Carol has a website, but you can see her most up-to-date work on her Facebook page.

Contact her through Facebook or at carolsartsite@gmail.com to inquire about purchasing her drawings.

dalmatian

The fine detail of Carol’s work makes it clear that drawing is what she is called to do.

Would you like to nominate yourself or another ACAC member for an Artist Spotlight article on this blog?
Email Lisa Cadigan or Karen Hendricks with your ideas for a great art story.

JAE: A June Tradition

Posted on: June 19th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

When you think of the word “tradition,” perhaps Christmas or the holidays come to mind. Well, it’s like Christmas every year, when we send out the call for entries into the Juried Art Exhibition and receive incredible surprises in return. This year, our office was flooded with more than 100 quality entries. Every year, the talent pool widens a bit, with artists from beyond the borders of Adams County entering their works, plus the depth of talent increases with works of greater quality being entered.

Now marking its 11th year, I think it’s safe to say the JAE has itself become a tradition. Artists plan and look forward to entering their works, supportive sponsors return year after year to underwrite prize monies, and area arts aficionados enjoy attending this well-respected show. The Schmucker Art Gallery at Gettysburg College is an incredible partner and host.

But there’s less than a week left! If you haven’t yet caught the 2014 show… be sure to stop by ASAP because the exhibit closes this Sunday, June 22. Admission is free and everyone is welcome! Hours are 10 am-4 pm daily.

Karen Coyle of Scott & Co Fine Jewelers presents the 2014 Best of Show Award to Robyn Jacobs of Littlestown.

Karen Coyle of Scott & Co Fine Jewelers presents the 2014 Best of Show Award to Robyn Jacobs of Littlestown.

Special kudos to…

  • Robyn Jacobs, Littlestown – Best in Show
  • Rob Millard-Mendez, Evansville, IN – 2nd Place
  • Alan Paulson, Gettysburg – 3rd Place
  • Joseph Opshinski, Scranton – 4th Place
  • Joh Ricci, Gettysburg – Blick Art Materials Award
  • Linda Benton McCloskey, Harrisburg – Schmucker Director’s Award
  • Stephanie Hicks, Gettysburg – People’s Choice Award

The 44 artists juried into this year’s show are…

Edward Babiarz, Dorothea Barrick, Paul Benyeda , Vince Bruinsma,  Pamela Cooper-White, Max K. Elias, Audrey Farnsworth, Sue Fehringer, Anne H. Finucane, Cynthia Gibbon, Jack Handshaw, Lisa Gohr Harman, Nanette Hatzes, Stephanie Hicks, Michael Hower, Roberta Rettew Iula, Robyn Jacobs, Sean P. Kennedy, Arline Slifer Kump, Chris Lauer,  Amy V. Lindenberger, Sheryl Massaro, Linda Benton McCloskey,  Michael McCullough, Sharon Pierce McCullough, Rob Millard-Mendez,  Teri Myers, Lori Nelson, Alison O’Brien, Joseph Opshinsky,  Alan Paulson,  Janet M. Powers, Brydie Ragan, Jill C. Rakowicz, Valerie M. Ramsburg, Joh Ricci, Bill Sachs, Rebecca Yates Shorb, Andrew T. Smith, Barrie Spessler, Dennis Steinauer, Dora Townsend, Lynn Uhlmann, and Deborah Williams

The 2014 Juried Art Exhibit, Schmucker Gallery at Gettysburg College

The 2014 Juried Art Exhibit, Schmucker Gallery at Gettysburg College

And a huge “thank you” to…

Thinking about entering next year’s 12th Annual Juried Art Exhibition? Look for application information this winter as the tradition continues!

Raise a Glass (or a Mug)… for the ACAC

Posted on: June 13th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

It’s said that the simple things in life are what provide the greatest joys. For those of you who are coffee drinkers, you know what I’m talking about. There is nothing like starting the day with that inticing aroma of freshly-brewed coffee… adding your favorite blend of sweeteners or cream (or boldly “taking it black”), and then enjoying those delicious, cutting-through-the-haze sips (or gulps—depending on how quickly you need your caffeine fix!)

Perhaps actor Hugh Jackman summarizes it best:

Coffee graphic

If you’re a coffee lover (and according to USA Today, 83% of all American adults are)… now your simple morning cup o’ joe can even benefit the Arts Council. That’s right, simply by drinking your coffee, you can help support the arts in Adams County. Heck, have a second or third cup! (Again, according to USA Today, the average American adult enjoys three cups a day.)

Image courtesy of Apple's Eyes Studio / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Apple’s Eyes Studio / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Introducing the ACAC’s Bean Club!

Here’s how it works: The ACAC is partnering with Gettysburg’s Ragged Edge Coffee House (110 Chambersburg Street) to offer nine delicious, fair trade, coffee blends through the ACAC Bean Club. Orders can be placed through the Arts Council every month, prior to the 15th of the month. The cost is $10.50 per pound, which is a savings from the retail price of $12 per pound when purchased directly through the Ragged Edge, plus proceeds benefit the ACAC. This month , since June 15 falls on the Sunday, orders will be accepted at the ACAC through Monday, June 16.

 

Here’s the list of tantalizing coffee blends being offered:

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

  • Direct Trade, Organic Honduran Marcala
  • Fair Trade, Organic Guatemalan
  • Fair Trade, Organic Bolivian Caranavi
  • Fair Trade Costa Rican Tarrazu
  • Indonesian Karo Highlands
  • Rwandan Buliza
  • Ethiopian
  • Brazilian
  • Columbian
  • Nicaraguan
  • South American Decaf Blend
  • Salted Caramel
  • Baileys Irish Cream
  • Birthday Cake
  • Coconut
  • French Vanilla
  • Hazelnut
Image courtesy of Ambro / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Ambro / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Click here for descriptions of the flavors, plus ordering info.  

Be sure to raise your morning mug with a “Cheers” to the ACAC! What a simple gesture and easy way for “your habit” to benefit the ACAC—many thanks!

And here are two upcoming Bean Club events to add to your calendar:

First Friday, August 1: Between 5-7:30 pm, festivities will include a coffee tasting plus you can meet coffee roaster Chad Close, Ragged Edge Roasting Company, and grower Emilio Garcia!

Thirdthursdaynoon Brown Bag Lunch Series, Thursday, August 21: “The Politics of Coffee” – Fair Trade? Direct Trade? What does this all have to do with my cup of Joe and me? Come and see how coffee is grown, learn about how buying and roasting beans works, and taste why fresh roasted coffee can make a believer out of you. Speakers include coffee roaster Chad Close, Ragged Edge Roasting Company, and grower Emilio Garcia.