Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County, PA

Archive for the ‘Arts Education’ Category

Arts Benefit Children – 2017

Posted on: April 28th, 2017 by Lisa Cadigan

 

Thank you for your generous donations to the 2017 ABC Campaign!

The final results are in! We raised the equivalent of 43 $50 donations! We are grateful to announce that a grand total of $2,135 was donated to enrich the lives of area children. Thanks to your generosity and support, 15 children will be able to attend summer arts camps with scholarships.

Donors for this year’s campaign include:

Anonymous
Mary Jo Bennett
Margy Borock
Tom Bricker
Judie Butterfield
Lisa Cadigan
Dennis Cadigan
Carmen Cordiano
Michael Flaherty
Lana Gowin
Geoff Grant
Jack Handshaw
Rebecca Harris
Janet Hikes
Sharon Hoke
Holahan Studio

Fran Ingram
Gerald Maloney
Eileen Mathias
Holly Purdy
Ladonna Reading
Sacred Lotus Yoga Studio
Dennis Steinauer
Susan Swope
Peggy Talbot
Lawrence Taylor
Susan Thomas
Kimberly Van Deusen
Sylvia Weaver
Mark Wesling
Elizabeth Zaic

 

2016 Camps

Last year, we served 380 campers, and 140 scholarships were awarded. 2016 was also the first year of our Annual Encouragement Awards.  Five campers received this award for their work during a summer arts camp. Your support truly makes a difference in the lives of children in our community.

Enjoy these photos from 2016 Summer Camps:

Photography Camp – Summer 2016

Ballerinas and Bears Camp – Summer 2016

Drawing Camp – Summer 2016

Cooking Camp – Summer 2016

Sewing Camp – Summer 2016

Introducing Wesley Doll: Superintendent of Upper Adams School District

Posted on: April 26th, 2017 by Lisa Cadigan

by Elle Lamboy

As superintendent of Upper Adams School District, Wesley Doll is a busy man. He barely had time for this interview but went out of his way to accommodate our schedule, which is a testament of his support for the Adams County Arts Council’s (ACAC) efforts to provide creative programming to local youth. Finding the time for art is not always easy, or valued, in education. Luckily, there are educators like Wesley Doll, who also goes the extra mile for the students of Upper Adams School District.

While he recognizes that one of the challenges he faces as a district leader is finding the resources to provide valuable artistic experiences, Wesley also understands the invaluable role arts play in the educational process stating, “The visual arts provide outlets for expressing feelings and ideas. The production of visual arts enhances creativity and problem solving, while utilizing components of science to produce a work of art. During the creative process, students sometimes find they are learning about themselves, and in many cases, they learn they are successful at creating a work, and that they are proud to be recognized as the artist.”

Student artwork from the Upper Adams school district

Wesley learned first hand how critical the role of an educator is in introducing art into a student’s life when he met his mentor in the seventh grade. “It was in Mr. Eric Miller’s art class at New Oxford Middle School, where I learned I may have a special interest and talent,” Wesley explains. “Mr. Miller became a mentor throughout my education at New Oxford and later at the University of Maryland, College Park. At Maryland, I started studying architecture and later focused my college studies on education, with a concentration in art. When I can find time today, I still enjoy my experiences with art and architecture as a result of the wonderful experiences I have been afforded throughout my life.”

While the demands of his job inhibit him from practicing his own art as much as he would like, he enjoys watercolor painting and finds inspiration in nature and architecture. He uses his free time to work with his two young daughters when they are inspired to create artwork.

Wesley supports the Adams County Arts Council’s (ACAC) effort to provide enriching programing through our summer camps, stating “The ACAC art summer camps provide opportunities for students to extend their current experiences in the arts. Additionally, the camps also provide people new learning experiences about the arts, while utilizing local talent to help provide creative and individualized opportunities in a comfortable environment.”

We hope you’ll be inspired by Wesley and the other educators in our series, and support the ACAC today. Your donations help to enrich the lives of local children who may not have the opportunity for an artful summer otherwise. Click here to learn more about our ABC campaign and donate now. We can’t succeed without your support. THANK YOU!

 

 

Introducing Donna Harrison: Principal at James Gettys Elementary

Posted on: April 25th, 2017 by Lisa Cadigan

By Lisa Cadigan

I had the pleasure of interviewing Donna Harrison, principal at James Gettys Elementary School in Gettysburg, and I asked her how she thinks studying the arts in school enhances learning.

She had a twinkle in her eye and a warm smile as she recounted tales of children who are able to “shine” when given an opportunity to express themselves creatively, particularly in the annual Fine Arts Night at James Gettys Elementary, which showcases student performances of songs and dance choreography learned in music and physical education classes. She noted similar observations in the music program for older students, “I see kids in orchestra who may struggle academically, but who thrive on an instrument.” Students involved in music and the arts are able to set and meet goals through the practice of creative expression in ways that translate to success in other areas as well.

Artist-in-residence Ellen Ehlenbeck worked with students to create a permanent autobiographical mobile installation in the lobby of James Gettys.

Mrs. Harrison shared stories of artists-in-residence who have spent time at James Gettys, like Ellen Ehlenbeck, whose program last year resulted in an installation of student-produced “self-portrait” mobiles that adorn the school’s lobby, and the National Circus Project (http://www.nationalcircusproject.com/) that visits every other year, teaching students to master a brand new performance skill over the course of just one week. The students love these opportunities, and look forward to them each year.

Art projects in each classroom help students to absorb concepts and express themselves.

But it’s not just visiting artists who are bursting with creativity in the halls of James Gettys. Mrs. Harrison commended an imaginative staff who often incorporate the arts into classroom teaching. The Action Based Learning (ABL) program uses a multi-sensory approach to help kindergartners learn letters and their sounds with whole-body movement. Art projects directly related to science, social studies and reading ensure that new concepts and ideas are being fully absorbed. Many teachers use songs regularly in class to instill good habits with lining up, washing hands, math facts, etc. Mrs. Harrison shared a story of one student who passed his test on the preamble of the Constitution by singing it—it was the only way he could remember all of the words.

Mrs. Harrison’s anecdotal observations are supported by multiple research studies, including the ideas presented in the article cited in our earlier ABC campaign blog post (http://adamsarts.org/support-the-arts-for-our-sake-its-as-easy-as-abc/) referencing Dr. Lois Hetland, professor and graduate coordinator in the art education department at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and senior research affiliate at Project Zero in the Harvard Graduate School of Education. In that interview, while Dr. Hetland says using art as a “vehicle to teach other academic content” is often “appropriate and useful,” she also warns that this should not be seen as a substitute for arts instruction, which places a unique emphasis on the “Eight Studio Habits of Mind.” Her research on this topic suggests that art instruction impacts students’ abilities to think meta-cognitively, even at early ages. This further reinforces the idea that arts education is key in helping to develop not just a student, but a human being. Dr. Hetland says, “The real product of art education is not the works of art, but the child.” The eight steps include these tangible skills:

  • Developing Craft
  • Engage And Persist
  • Envision
  • Express
  • Observe
  • Reflect
  • Stretch And Explore
  • Understand Art World

My conversation with Mrs. Harrison supported these ideas. We discussed the importance of creative expression and instruction in an academic setting, and how it allows students to set goals and reach their own great expectations in ways that may not always be possible in other areas. “We can’t just focus on test scores. We need to keep the whole child in mind,” says Mrs. Harrison.

You can help a child develop important skills like practicing a craft, engaging and persisting, expression, observation and reflection by making a donation to our ABC campaign. Every three $50 donations sends one child to a summer arts camp.

Thank you for your support!

Donate now!

 

References

“A Look at Lois Hetland’s Eight Studio Habits.” Every Art, Every Child | Studio Habits. Northeastern Illinois University, 2012. Web. 24 Apr. 2017. <http://www.everyarteverychild.org/assessment/studiohabits.html>.

Cadigan, Lisa C. “Support the Arts for OUR Sake: It’s as Easy as ABC.” Adams County Arts Council. Adams County Arts Council, 22 Apr. 2017. Web. 24 Apr. 2017. <http://adamsarts.org/support-the-arts-for-our-sake-its-as-easy-as-abc/>.

Heller, Rafael. “On the Goals and Outcomes of Arts Education: An Interview with Lois Hetland.” Phi Beta Kappan 98.7 (2017): 15-20. Web. 21 Apr. 2017.

 

Introducing Sarah Auld: Art Teacher at Gettysburg Area Middle School

Posted on: April 23rd, 2017 by Lisa Cadigan

by Polly Patrono-Carlson

 

Sarah Auld is everything one would expect from an art teacher. She is positive, creative, and extremely thoughtful. Her room and the various cases around the school—full of student work—show how proud she is of her students and their accomplishments.

A 2016 graduate from Millersville University, Sarah started her new adventure at Gettysburg Area Middle School (GAMS) far from her hometown of Easton. She says the best part of teaching is the unexpected, “There is never a boring day.”

For Miss Auld, the importance of arts education is giving students an opportunity to create, to problem solve, and to feel accomplished. Arts education is not just about the end product, but more importantly, it is about the journey to reach it. In her classes, students have a chance to create from their own vision, learning along the way that there may be more than one way to get there.

Currently, her class is working on creating art using exacto knives. Scary…yes, but the projects so far have been amazing. When tuned in to a mindful process, students have produced animals, everyday household objects and even the Eiffel Tower out of cardboard, using just a knife and a little imagination.

Sarah encourages her students to interpret the word “connection” as they develop their own inspiration for project ideas. Once they create their own vision in their minds, they are given a practical tool to express themselves through their ideas. This process of challenge, creation and accomplishment summarizes the importance of arts education in school.

Sarah knows that with the demands of testing and their many obligations, kids often feel like they have the weight of the world on their shoulders. She hopes that art and her classroom offer students the necessary place to connect, solve problems and create. Art is a haven she is happy to provide for the students at Gettysburg Middle School.

There are many students who shine in the art classroom, and who deserve a place to pursue those interests further outside of school. Like any skill, art requires practice, and the more opportunities we can offer students to explore, create, and problem solve, the better. With this in mind, we hope you will consider a donation to the Adams County Arts Council’s Arts Benefit Children (ABC) campaign, where every three $50 donations sends a child to a summer arts camp. Every dollar counts – thank you for your support!

Support the Arts for OUR Sake: It’s as Easy as ABC

Posted on: April 22nd, 2017 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

 

As we approach the end of another school year, the Adams County Arts Council is excited to launch our fourth annual Arts Benefit Children (ABC) campaign. Be sure to join us for our 50/50 campaign beginning Tuesday, April 25 and continuing through Thursday, April 27 to raise critical funds for summer camp and class scholarships to benefit disadvantaged youth. Every three $50 donations collected during this 50-hour period will send a child to a summer arts camp.

Why is arts education so important?

In February of this year, non-profit organization Americans for the Arts published an informative and motivating Top Ten List of Reasons to Support the Arts (Cohen 2017). The list includes a variety of positive outcomes not limited to benefits to health care, improved academic performance, and a stronger economy.

In previous years, the organization has shared the following findings specifically regarding the arts in education:

  • Arts education “makes a tremendous impact on the developmental growth of every child and has been proven to help level the “learning field” across socio-economic boundaries.”
  • Arts education strengthens student problem-solving and critical thinking skills, adding to overall academic achievement and school success.
  • And arts education can help troubled youth, providing an alternative to destructive behavior and another way for students to approach learning.

Young people who participate in the arts for at least three hours on three days each week through at least one full year are:

  • 4 times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement
  • 3 times more likely to be elected to class office within their schools
  • 4 times more likely to participate in a math and science fair

Young artists, as compared with their peers, are likely to:

  • Read for pleasure nearly twice as often
  • Perform community service more than four times as often (Hendricks, 2014)

Anecdotally, we all have experiences that verify these claims in our own lives. Why then does it always seem to be such a struggle to keep the arts afloat financially? Lois Hetland, professor and graduate coordinator in the art education department at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and senior research affiliate at Project Zero in the Harvard Graduate School of Education, agrees that while these correlations exist, research is inconclusive as to whether these positive outcomes are based on a direct cause and effect relationship. That said, she also doesn’t think this is where we should be placing our focus: “There are more effective ways to advocate for arts education than to rely on the glacially slow emergence of new research in this area,” she says. It is more effective to advocate for arts education as “arts for our sake,” rather than art for “instrumental purposes” vs. “arts for art’s sake.” In an interview published in Phi Delta Kappan magazine, she reminds us that “…the arts are essential tools for thinking and communicating…The arts have been created and appreciated in every culture dating back to the earliest days of homo sapiens, suggesting they are part of our basic human equipment, allowing us to express things that can’t be expressed otherwise.” As such they are equally important to other disciplines taught in school – not more important, not less important, not solely for the purpose of supporting other areas of academics, but for the purpose of allowing people to “connect the rational with the intuitive, the brain and the body…It allows (people) to express a sense of the whole human being” (Heller, 2017).

This year, the ABC campaign features local educators and administrators and their views on the importance of arts education. As we prepared interviews with these dedicated professionals, the theme of the importance of educating “the whole child” was common.

Please enjoy the next few days of articles, share them with your social networks, and consider broadening the life experience of a young person by donating toward this year’s scholarship fund. It’s as easy as A-B-C:

A. Starting at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, April 25, visit http://adamsarts.org/sponsorship and make your donation. Every three $50 donations sends one child to a summer art camp, but every dollar counts and no donation is too small.

B. Share and tweet this information with your friends on all of your social networks.  We will be sharing blog posts and stories throughout the event, so there will be many opportunities to help us spread the word and invite your friends to participate.

C. Be sure to watch our progress online!  We will update ACAC’s sponsorship page and social media outlets regularly throughout the 50-hour period to let you know how we’re doing.  The event begins at 8 AM on April 25, and ends at 10 AM on April 27.  Don’t miss out on this amazing and fun opportunity to help a child access the arts.

References:

Cohen, Randy I. “Top Ten Reasons to Support the Arts in 2017.”Blog.americansforthearts.org. Americans for the Arts, 14 Feb. 2017. Web. 21 Apr. 2017. <http://blog.americansforthearts.org/2017/02/14/top-10-reasons-to-support-the-arts-in-2017>.

Heller, Rafael. “On the Goals and Outcomes of Arts Education: An Interview with Lois Hetland.” Phi Beta Kappan 98.7 (2017): 15-20. Web. 21 Apr. 2017.

Hendricks, Karen. “The ABCs of Arts Education.” Blog post. Adamsarts.org. Adams County Arts Council, 14 May 2014. Web. 21 Apr. 2017. <http://adamsarts.org/the-a-b-cs-of-arts-education/>.

December Days at the ACAC: Christmas Creativity, Comfort Foods

Posted on: November 26th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks

100mediaimag3647_1It’s as simple as 1, 2, 3: Kick off the month of December with three opportunities to enjoy fun classes at the ACAC with an eye towards holiday gift-giving:

First, on December 1, round up your girlfriends and enjoy a fun evening before the “holiday crazies” hit. Deck the halls with your artwork for the holiday season! Or, give your artwork to a special friend or family member—what a treasured, one-of-a-kind gift you’ll be giving! The wintry snowman, at right, is the scene you’ll be creating.

Paint and Wine Night, Thursday, December 1, 6-8:30 p.m.
Grab a friend, or come and make some new friends and enjoy an evening of artistic creativity, wine and amusement. We’ll provide the supplies and step by step instruction to complete a piece of art- no experience necessary! Marie Smith, $36  Register

Next, on December 2, prep for the long winter days ahead by learning how to take care of your family with healthy comfort foods. You’ll enjoy a fun cooking class to boot!

Fall Harvest Cooking 3, Friday, December 2, 6-8 p.m.
Let’s hear it for the roots! Potatoes, beets, and onions take center stage as you learn how to season and pair these late harvest delights with comfort foods that are healthy.
Suborn Sijipati  Register

Healthy Harvest: root vegetables

Healthy Harvest: root vegetables

And on December 3, make unique fused glass ornaments to trim your own tree or to give away as Christmas or Chanukah gifts. Hand-crafted, homemade gifts are some of the most special and treasured gifts. Plus you’ll have fun seeing your creations come together, as you learn how to fuse glass!

Fused Glass Holiday Ornaments: Saturday, December 3, 10-12:30 pm 
Learn glass fusing techniques as you make several beautiful Christmas/Chanukah-themed glass ornaments. You work at your own pace, making this is a great class for both beginners and intermediates.   Leah Powell
 $45.00 ($42)  Register

Sparkling creations: fused glass ornaments

Sparkling creations: fused glass ornaments

Share a love of the arts with your friends & family this holiday season. Does your Christmas shopping list contain any of the following people?

  • Someone who already has everything he/she needs?
  • Someone you’d like to spend time with, do something special with?
  • Someone who is hard to buy for?
  • Area children who enjoy being creative?
  • Someone in need of a treat, a night out, a fun experience?

ACAC gift certificates are the perfect solution! They are redeemable for any future classes at the ACAC including cooking classes, arts & crafts workshops, dance/yoga classes, fine arts classes such as painting or drawing instruction, pottery classes resulting in beautiful creations… and the list goes on and on.

Gift certificates can be purchased during regular business hours:

  • Monday – Friday: 9 am – 5 pm
  • Saturday: 10 am – 2 pm

Wishing you a holiday season filled with creativity and the arts!

Girls’ Night Out: Cutout Canvas Wall Art

Posted on: October 19th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks
lori-nelson-cut-canvas

Lori Nelson’s cut canvas wall art: Make you own during Friday Friday, Nov. 4!

There’s a twist to the ACAC’s next “First Friday” event: Attendees will not only be able to enjoy a great night on the town with gallery exhibits and refreshments, but they will also be able to create a stunning piece of artwork at the ACAC.

“Girls’Night Out: Cutout Canvas Wall Art” is a new class debuting on First Friday, November 4, 6-8 pm. Girlfriends are encouraged to round up a friend or two, put in their RSVPs now, and with the help of instructor Lori Nelson, and no experience needed, have a fun evening creating a gorgeous piece of artwork.

“The idea for this class actually originated with my own daughter going to college and wanting artwork for her walls,” Nelson explains. “I love working with an Exacto knife, cutting out designs.”

lori-nelson-cut-canvas-series

Lori Nelson’s cut canvas series, created for her daughter

“Cutout canvas wall art is something fairly simple, and I think everyone who attends will come away with a piece of artwork they can be proud of. I have a very practical approach to art—I like seeing people being able to use their art, to hang it up, and enjoy it.”

“Not to put down ‘paint nights’ at all, but that takes a certain set of skills, and not everyone goes home with a piece of artwork they’re proud of hang on their walls—a lot of times people enjoy the process of creating the art more than the end result,” Nelson explains.

All proceeds from the First Friday class benefit the Arts Council.

Nelson, a longtime ACAC instructor (she’s one of the original instructors going back to the ACAC’s former location on Carlisle Street, when classes were first offered through the ACAC), says she enjoys sharing her love of the arts with both adults and children. Although pottery is her main focus, Nelson says she enjoys switching gears and putting her fine arts degree to work by dabbling in other art forms.

Most days, she works in her home-based pottery studio. Two days a week, she works for Fitzgerald Pottery. The Dillsburg-based business mentored her start with pottery, and she has enjoyed working for them for the past 30 years.

“Even though I’m an artist by trade, I’ve always had a passion for teaching art so that people can enjoy it and appreciate it better,” she says.

 

Click here to register for Girls’ Night Out: Cutout Canvas Wall Art. Cost is $30 for ACAC members; $33 for non-members.

Explore Lori Nelson’s Pottery online

And click here to visit Fitzgerald Pottery

Holy Incognito! It’s the Adams County Arts Council’s 16th Annual Masquerade Party

Posted on: October 12th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

article by Elle Lamboy

PostcardFrontDate (2)Ever wish you could escape inside your favorite comic book or comic strip? Now’s your chance!

On Friday, October 21, the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) hosts the 16th Annual Masquerade Party at the Gettysburg Hotel. This year’s theme is ComicsZone!!! and festivities begin at 8:00 p.m.

Gettysburg Times Editor Alex Hayes will preside as Master of Ceremonies for a magical night of dinner, dancing, and fun in the ComicsZone!!!

We look forward to seeing a hopping dance floor of superheroes, villains, cartoons, and other larger than life characters from a myriad of comics, dancing to the tunes of the eight-piece Colgan Hirsh Band with the Slammin’ Horns. You may also wear formal attire with a mask or wig.

colgan-hirsh-photo

Colgan Hirsh Band with the Slammin’ Horns

Cast members from the GCT production of Rocky Horror Picture Show

Cast members from the GCT production of The Rocky Horror Show

The Arts Council’s thriving partnership with Gettysburg Community Theatre (GCT) continues as GCT Founding Executive/Artistic Director Chad-Alan Carr is the Party’s chair. Chad and cast members of GCT’s upcoming production of The Rocky Horror Show will perform during a “time-warping” floor show.

In addition to fabulous costumes and bumping dance floor, the ACAC will again present one of the most talked-about silent auctions in the area featuring authentic works from artists and community members. Jewelry, event tickets, artwork, and an array of gift and culinary items round out this year’s auction; setting the tone for a fun and fierce bidding scene.

Heather Entwistle Roberts will lead local attorneys as judge and jury for the Conga Line Costume Contest which is always a fun and competitive aspect to the party.

A new addition to the party this year is a palm reading by Julie Pellegrino.

You may select a Dinner & Party option at $75 per person which begins with a full course dinner at 7 p.m. Party-only tickets are $30 for a reserved seat or $20 general admission (no seat.) Tickets are available at the Arts Education Center at 125 S. Washington St., Gettysburg, by calling 717 334-5006, by clicking here to purchase online, or at the door (party-only).

The ACAC thanks the Party’s sponsors including Danny Sebright, L & H Services Group Inc., Fresh Boutique, Grace Kelly Salon, Rice Fruit Company, and Wellspan Gettysburg Hospital.

Event proceeds support arts education programs at the Arts Council’s Arts Education Center in Gettysburg and across the county.

The stylists at Grace Kelly Salon along with owner Kelly Kaiser (right) were Lady Gagas at last year’s Masquerade Party with a Rock Star Theme. ComicsZone!!! is the theme for this year’s party.

 

Fall Flavors Inspired by the Mediterranean

Posted on: October 4th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

Join Us for this Farm-to-Table Event sponsored by Wellspan Gettysburg Hospital

Roasted lamb ribs

We are thrilled to host Wellspan’s Chef Rosario Campiri on Thursday, October 13 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. for a night of bold fall flavors and wine pairings inspired by the Mediterranean. Join us as Chef Campiri demonstrates techniques and tricks of the trade useful for every course of a gourmet meal.  Learn knife techniques to trim and season a roast lamb loin, how to make a quick saute, how to work with rhubarb, and for dessert, how to make a pie crust from scratch.  The evening’s demonstration includes wine paired with a beautiful menu of dishes prepared with fresh ingredients, including:

Fresh organic asparagus on a cutting board with Parma ham on a rustic tableCold and Hot Appetizers

  • Heirloom Tomato and Avocado Salad with Balsamic Glaze w/Rose Petal Salt, Oven Roasted Asparagus, Red Peppers, Zucchini, and Portabella Mushrooms served along with Grilled Multigrain Ciabatta Bread.
  • Local Artisan Cheeses, Smoked Meats, Grapes, Mellon & Berry Platter.
  • Seared Diver Sea Scallop Bites w/ Roasted Corn Pico di Gallo
  • Fall Root Vegetables Stuffed Hazelnut Crusted Chicken Breast w/Frangelico Cream Sauce/Fresh Chives
  • New Zealand Lamb Loin Chops w/ Crispy Herb and Leek Crust
  • Sauté of Spinach, Kale, and Assorted Leafy Greens. Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Shallots

Hands baking dough with rolling pin on wooden table, depth of fieldDessert:

  • Adams County Apple, Rhubarb and Cranberry Croustade w/Pineapple Sorbet

Register today for this delicious event!

Thursday, October 13, 2016
5:30-7:30 p.m.
$36 for members/$40 for non-members

Adams County Arts Council Education Center
125 South Washington Street
Gettysburg, PA 17325

For more information, call (717) 334-5006 or send us an email.

wellspan-webEating Well Matters,
sponsored by Wellspan Gettysburg Hospital

It’s HERE! Arts Benefit Children (ABC) 50/50
April 26-28

Posted on: April 25th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

In preparation for our exciting online event, ABC 50/50, we have spent the past few weeks introducing you to prominent members of our community who have one thing in common: they all recognize the importance of creative thinking and aesthetic expression in connecting us to each other in community, which consequently maximizes our quality of life as human beings.

Ed W Clark GETT - March 2014

Ed Clark

In our first article, you met Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site, who explains the importance of using the artistic and aesthetic aspects of our town to teach its rich history to generation after generation. An understanding of history informs our treatment of others, our politics and our plans for the future both as a local community and as a united world. The artistic monuments, books, paintings, plays, and museums are just a few examples of how that history has been shared in Gettysburg with people from all over the world.

Marty Qually

Marty Qually

Next we introduced you to Adams County Commissioner Marty Qually, who creatively thinks of our county as “a canvas, and there are 100,000 people with paintbrushes.” He says, “My job is to help all of them paint this county into something better than it was.” Commissioner Qually reminds us that to do a good job at whatever your career may be, one should find a creative “niche” from which to do it.

Marc-thumb

Marc Jalbert

We introduced you to baker and entrepreneur Marc Jalbert, a successful business owner in the Gettysburg area for over 20 years, who began his career with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in painting from the University of Southern Maine. Jalbert’s arts education still informs decisions he makes with his business every day, and we as a community reap the benefits when we visit his beautiful bakery and sample the artisan breads and pastries he offers in service.

PresidentRiggs2015_thumb

Janet Riggs

In a political climate where liberal arts degrees are often discounted, Gettysburg College President Janet Riggs recently offered her thoughts in an editorial in the Miami Herald: “Politicians are doing a disservice to us all by blasting the liberal arts. Residential liberal arts colleges prepare students not only for professional success, but also for lives of civic impact. Our world needs more people — not fewer — with this kind of preparation.” She goes on to emphasize that an education that focuses on creative thinking in a variety of disciplines produces citizens who “go on to have rich and diverse careers in human services, marketing, business, research, human resources, consulting, and education,” noting that her own liberal arts education and major in psychology eventually landed her a position as the president of a prestigious college.

I wish we could profile 100 more people in this series – We are so blessed to live among a diversely creative group of people in this community, each of whom makes a lasting contribution to the tapestry of our lives. I know I am not alone in my desire to continue improving upon our quality of life while preparing the next generation of creative thinkers and community leaders. We all have an opportunity right now to help make that happen.

Join us April 26 through the 28th and make your donation to the ABC 50/50 campaign.

Why “50/50”?

We are asking for $50 donations over a 50-hour period, from Tuesday April 26 at 8 a.m. through Thursday, April 28 at 8 a.m. It takes three $50 donations to send a child to a summer arts camp. Will you help us send kids to camp and classes this year?

Can’t spare $50? We will be so grateful if you can make a $50 donation (or more) toward this campaign; however, if $50 seems too steep, every $0.50 counts, too. Remember the success of our 2014 campaign? We were able to send 20 kids to camp with your $1 to $10 donations. It all counts, so make your donation today!

How can I help?
It’s as easy as A-B-C:

ABC-LOGO-webA. Visit adamsarts.org/sponsorship on April 26 and make your online donation.

B. Share, email and tweet this information to all of your contacts on social media. Your sharing is essential to the success of this campaign.

C. Be sure to watch (and share) our progress online! How many $50 donations can we receive in 50 hours? We will keep you posted on the sponsorship page and on Facebook and Twitter throughout the event.

This event was made possible by the volunteer efforts of the Adams County Arts Council’s Marketing and Development Committee:
Lisa Cadigan, Chair
Anne Cherry
Carol Cook
Joyce Ettenger
Chris Glatfelter (executive director, ACAC)
Nanette Hatzes
Wendy Heiges
Karen Hendricks
Elle Lamboy
Polly Patrono-Carlson

FB

Marc Jalbert on How to Be an Entrepreneur:
Major in Art

Posted on: April 22nd, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series leads to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28. Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Marc

Marc Jalbert

Today’s article is features Marc Jalbert, entrepreneur baker and owner of the Gettysburg Baking Company, which is nestled in the corner of Lincoln Square in Gettysburg.

Adams County residents as well as visitors from near and far are familiar with the Gettysburg Baking Company, its baker/owner Marc Jalbert, and the beautiful and delicious artisan breads and pastries the bakery offers. (If you’re not – go visit and buy a seeded twist!) Jalbert has been a successful small-business owner in Adams County for twenty years. During that time, various incarnations of his bakery/café have seen success thanks to high quality products, impeccable customer service, and beautifully designed, well-managed spaces.

How did Marc Jalbert come to be such a successful entrepreneur and fixture in the Gettysburg restaurant scene? Was he a business major? Did he study hotel and restaurant management as an undergraduate? These are answers one may expect from a successful restaurateur, but Jalbert actually began his career with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Southern Maine.

Marc_seededtwist

Marc’s famous seeded twists

After teaching art briefly at a private school following graduation, Jalbert realized he “wanted to do his own thing,” so he started freelancing as a graphic designer. Sitting behind a desk all day soon grew tiresome, so he followed his curiosity to learn how to bake – a job that allowed him to be up and about while working with his hands to create an aesthetic and delicious product. “I naively thought baking would be easier than cooking,” Jalbert confesses. But he also feels that his naiveté kept him in the game to keep learning. He took a few classes at King Arthur Flour in Norwich, Vermont after working as a self-taught baker for about six years, and moved to Gettysburg in 1995 with the intentions of establishing a bakery business and storefront.

How did his fine arts degree prepare him for running a business? “Every challenge that comes up can be thought of as a design problem,” says Jalbert. “Whether it’s marketing and designing logos and communications materials, setting up a space that is an efficient and user-friendly place to work and visit, or managing a staff, an artist is trained to look at the whole as well as its parts and how they fit together.” Jalbert had the additional benefit of being raised in an entrepreneurial environment – his dad owned a barbershop in Maine. An avid reader, he continues to read and learn as new challenges arise, but he says he uses his fine arts major every day.

Marc_bakery“Artists are trained to be mindful and pay attention,” says Jalbert. “As an art student, you are trained to stop and look at things – it’s a more open-ended means of problem solving, which may be more suited to ‘jobs of the future.’ Who ever heard of a webmaster 20 years ago?” Rather than education that strictly trains for a task, Jalbert suggests we consider focusing more on education for creative thinking as jobs that didn’t even exist in the not-so-distant past continue to evolve in our society.

If you visit his shop and pay attention, it’s easy to notice the details of the artist in the space, from the warm and welcoming color scheme, to the use of space; from the accessories carefully chosen to display his wares, to the beautiful details in the shape, texture and color of each loaf and pastry. And don’t forget the taste. Everything is delicious.

Marc_stickybunsAs we kick off our Arts Benefit Children (ABC) 50/50 event on April 26 to raise scholarship funds for children to attend arts camps and classes at the ACAC, remember fellow community members like Marc, whose business contributes so much to the quality of life in Adams County. It is largely thanks to art education that Jalbert is able to contribute so much to our community as a small business owner and entrepreneur. Help us continue to foster new generations of creative thinkers and doers by participating in ABC 50/50. Stay tuned for more news on this exciting event.

ABC-Med-Blog-640w

Summer Flashback!

Posted on: April 20th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks

Photos by Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator

summer flashback 1

Chefs in the kitchen, Putting It All Together! Summer 2015

April… a transitional month that combines gorgeous sunshine-filled days as well as rain-splashed days, as we take a step closer to summer.

And summer is one of the busiest and happiest times of year at the Arts Education Center thanks to the fun lineup of Summer Arts Camps that enrich the lives of hundreds of area children!

As we gear up for another fabulous summer season, we want to let the community know how much these camps impact children’s (and families’) lives. In just a few days, from April 26-28, we are launching an online event, Arts Benefit Children (ABC): 50/50 to raise money for scholarships that help many area children attend summer arts camps.

Meantime, if you are a parent or grandparent interested in enrolling your children/grandchildren in summer arts camps, feel free to take advantage of a special offer available through May 2, 2016: Buy 2 camps, get the 3rd at ½ off! (Click here for the online schedule.)

Enjoy taking a look back at photos and testimonials from last year’s 2015 Summer Arts Camps season:

summer flashback 2

Beautiful sounds & syncopated rhythms are coming from the Gallery thanks to ACAC Youth Choir Camp, Brent Talbot, Director, Matt Carlson, Assistant Director.

 

summer flashback 3

Mask Making campers are learning how to create zentangles! Stanley Gilmore Instructor.

 

summer flashback 4

The Art of Mask Making!!! Masks are on their way to completion!! Stanley Gilmore, Instructor

 

summer flashback 5

Get Your Dance Groove On campers are striking a pose! Hope Lawrence Instructor

Testimonials, summer 2015:

How was the class registration process? Easy, painless (consistent answer from the majority of families)

What summer projects were favorites?

  • All of them! (consistent answer from many families

The Preschool Ballerina and Bears campers liked:

  • The gummy bear dance
  • Dancing with boys
  • The end of week dance for family
  • Dancing with new friends
  • Savannah enjoyed the dance steps she learned and has been dancing around the house
summer flashback 6

Chef Chris Rinehart has prepared a fantastic menu for the Chef Camp for Foodies campers!

 

summer flashback 7

Wow!! Look what our Sewing is Fun campers made!

 

summer flashback 8

Ballerinas & Bears campers are performing for their family & friends for their end of camp week party!

More summer 2015 testimonials:

Can you share any specific comments about the camp your child shared with you?

  • They liked everything
  • Loved coming every day
  • Wished it was longer
  • He learned a lot
  • She was very excited to come everyday and wrote “I had fun with this ‘extrodanary’ teacher!”

What did your child like most about art class?

  • Everything!
  • Creating his own unique mask
  • Learning new recipes and mixing things

100% agreed–Yes, they would recommend the art classes to others!

Summer Arts Camps received an average 4.85 out of 5 rating!

summer flashback 9

Sewing IS fun!!! Linda Fauth, Instructor.

 

summer flashback 10

Castles Castles Castles campers are creating some incredible castles.

 

summer flashback 11

Mr. Jack has prepared a table for 13….potters that is! Dirty Hands Pottery camp… dig in!

 

summer flashback 12

Linda Fauth, Cooks in the Kitchen Instructor, is preparing for today’s menu which will include peach cobbler, personalized pizzas and red bean quesadillas. Yum!

 

summer flashback 13

Fun With Weaving Camp, Joh Ricci Instructor

 

summer flashback 14

Build a House camper with Instructor Erica Woodworth.

 

summer flashback 15

Happy ACAC Guitar Camp students

We hope you join us online, to transform and enrich the lives of area children, April 26-27, for ABC: 50/50 (Arts Benefit Children). This is the 3rd annual ABC event, which has proven to be a successful event with great community support for which we (and many area families) are extremely thankful. It has also proven to be an essential event, supporting scholarships that have allowed dozens of area children to attend summer arts camps as well as arts classes throughout the year. Stay tuned for more details on the upcoming 2016 event!

ABC-Med-Blog-640w

 

 

Marty Qually: “Find Your Niche”

Posted on: April 14th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

Article by Elle Lamboy and Karen Hendricks

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series is leading up to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28: Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Marty Qually

Today’s article is the second in this community-based series, featuring Marty Qually, who serves as one of 3 Adams County Commissioners.

Politics and the arts rarely mix—especially in the current Presidential campaign climate!

But, that’s what makes Adams County’s only Democratic Commissioner, Marty Qually, unique.

Marty was first elected to the Board of Commissioners in 2011 and is now serving his second term.

According to the county’s website, prior to becoming a County Commissioner, Commissioner Qually was an Adams County Auditor. With his background as Auditor, much of his focus as a Commissioner has been and continues to be promoting projects that are both fiscally responsible and sustainable. Commissioner Qually also serves on a number of boards including the Adams County Economic Development Corporation and regularly attends community meetings focused on quality of life, economic sustainability, and rural concerns throughout the County.

The Commissioner is a “strong advocate for the arts.” While he confesses he, “couldn’t draw a straight line” as a child, he started exploring various art forms after college. When he was introduced to the art of dreamcatchers, he discovered his niche. Crafting his dream catchers and developing his own personal style encouraged Marty to create his own hand-blown glass beads. Through this creative process, he discovered his inner artist and found his first creative outlet as an adult. When asked how others can find their creative outlet he suggests, “Try lots of different creative things until you find your own niche.”

As Commissioner Qually’s experience shows, art doesn’t always come naturally but it’s important to keep exploring until you discover the area of art that clicks with you personally. Commissioner Qually didn’t start out in the arts field, but through exploring several art forms, he found something that allowed him to create beautiful things and express his creativity. As the Commissioner observes, “art adds beauty to our world and we all need a little beauty in our lives.”

The summer camps and classes at the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) are the perfect launching pad for “finding your niche” as an artist. Many of the individuals at the camps are trying an art form for the first time; and all of the instructors embrace both novice and expert arts alike. With over 30 camps and classes at affordable price points, taking a summer class often ignites the inspiration to unlock one’s inner artist. From cooking classes and wine tastings, to writing workshops and computer lessons, to pottery and painting, the ACAC has something for all ages and levels of interest.

Commissioner Qually is a huge supporter of the camps and saw a creative awakening in his son through the camp experience. His son, “attended several pottery camps at ACAC and realized he has a gift and passion for sculpting.” The best part about his son’s experience, Qually continues, is that his son “learned to be creative for its own rewards and not for others’ approval. His artwork is an outlet for him.”

Above all, Commissioner Qually feels his affinity for the arts has helped him be a more creative diplomat, sharing, “As a public servant, I think of the county as a canvas and there are 100,000 people with paintbrushes. My job is to help all of them paint this county into something better than it was.”

We hope you join us online, to transform and enrich the lives of area children, April 26-28, for ABC: 50/50 (Arts Benefit Children). This is the 3rd annual ABC event, which has proven to be a successful event with great community support for which we (and many area families) are extremely thankful. It has also proven to be an essential event, supporting scholarships that have allowed dozens of area children to attend summer arts camps as well as arts classes throughout the year. Stay tuned for more details on the upcoming 2016 event!

ABC-Med-Blog-640w

Ed Clark: Gettysburg is an “Arts Destination”

Posted on: April 7th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks
Ed W Clark GETT - March 2014

Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site. Photo Courtesy: Gettysburg National Military Park

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series is leading up to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28: Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Today’s article is the first in this community-based series, featuring Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site.

The Adams County Arts Council’s mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. We believe the arts have the ability to transform lives, to touch everyone’s daily life. As a community leader, what role do the arts play in your daily life?

Clark:  New and expanded arts programming is helping us find ways to connect with new audiences in our communities and across the country.  Our vision at Gettysburg and Eisenhower national parks is to provide memorable experiences for our visitors so that when they leave, they tell others to come here, and tell their sons and daughters how important these places are.  We can’t preserve these parks for future generations all on our own.

Artwork, in the form of sculptures and monuments, surround you at Gettysburg National Military Park. Do you have a particular sculpture or sculptures that you find especially inspiring? Share any stories or personal insights you’d like.

Clark:  While I don’t have a favorite monument, I do have one that stands out for me as a transformational moment, and a memory I’ll always have.  I can remember standing in tall grass near the Virginia Monument, staring out past the Emmitsburg Road, listening to my father wondering aloud about General Lee’s fateful decision to launch the frontal assault of July 3, 1863. I was transformed.  Through the fences and expansive fields, I could picture what my ancestors must have seen at the copse of trees.  As I crossed that field, I was walking in their footsteps.  That’s a moment for me, rooted right at the base of a Gettysburg monument, helping to form a deep appreciation of history and its modern connections and importance.

I understand Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site have a number of upcoming art-related events such as the Artists-In-Residence program, and the June 2016 opening of the temporary exhibit, “With Brush, Mold, Chisel, and Pen: Reflections on Civil War Art.” Why is it important to integrate art with your programming?

Clark:  We’ve joined more than 50 Artists-in-Residence programs in national parks across the country.  By focusing on arts programs we can find new expressions of the park experience and find fresh perspectives that showcase the meaning of the parks.

Throughout 2016, the Centennial year for the National Park Service, we’re creating events and programs that engage with and create the next generation of visitors, supporters, and advocates.  Our exhibit, “With Brush, Mold, Chisel, and Pen: Reflections on Civil War Art,” opening June 29, is a big part of the effort, as is our First Friday events at the Train Station and the popular “Presidential Paint and Wine Night” programs at the Eisenhower site.

Sketch book by Ted Walsh / Photo Courtesy: Gettysburg National Military Park

Sketch book by Ted Walsh / Photo Courtesy: Gettysburg National Military Park

The Arts Council is holding an online fundraiser this April, to support a scholarship fund to help Adams County children attend summer arts camps. What role do you feel arts education plays in children’s development?

Clark:  Our parks are a great place to come to learn about history of course, but you can also learn lessons in communication and arts (Gettysburg Address and monument dedication speeches, for example); about character education (leadership, citizenship, courage etc.); and about science and nature (geology at Devil’s Den, engineering etc.).

At Gettysburg, the arts are all around us through the monuments, as well as the paintings and photographs and poems that the landscape and its history has inspired.

As far as its role in children’s development, art is about connecting on an emotional level, expression and creativity.  The monuments express all kinds of sentiments that the veterans wanted future generations to remember.  Children learn how to create and express through art, and also how to see and interpret the art of others, thereby improving their critical thinking skills. Art can make difficult, or more complex concepts accessible.

Do you feel that history and art face a similar uphill battle today, trying to remain relevant and alive? 

Clark:  Art is a fundamental way that people connect with the parks.  The lessons of leadership, bravery, conduct, recovery and resilience that can be learned on the battlefield at Gettysburg, in the cemetery, and at the Eisenhower farm are lessons that have value in our lives, from the first grade, right on through.  We’re overflowing with inspiring stories – our challenge is always to continue to work on making the connections to our audiences.  Arts programming helps us make those connections.

Cyclorama painting / Photo courtesy: Bill Dowling

Cyclorama painting / Photo courtesy: Bill Dowling

Feel free to share any additional thoughts on the “power” of the arts…

Clark:  Just as Gettysburg is a civil war destination it is also really an arts destination – with everything we have from the monuments, to the Cyclorama painting, to the incredible works of art in our collection and President Eisenhower’s dedication to art in his later years.

We often talk about Gettysburg as having the “power of place.” I’ve seen that power: people visibly, emotionally moved while looking at the Cyclorama painting, for example.  We’re excited to be using multiple media and techniques to create memorable experiences that visitors will take with them, hopefully transforming them.

We hope you join us online, to transform and enrich the lives of area children, April 26-28, for ABC: 50/50 (Arts Benefit Children). This is the 3rd annual ABC event, which has proven to be a successful event with great community support for which we (and many area families) are extremely thankful. It has also proven to be an essential event, supporting scholarships that have allowed dozens of area children to attend summer arts camps as well as arts classes throughout the year. Stay tuned for more details on the upcoming 2016 event!

ABC-Med-Blog-640w

A Wintry Warm Farm-to-Table Supper with Chef Josh Fidler

Posted on: February 5th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

header-graphic-web

According to the groundhog, spring is not so far away. On Sunday, February 28, Chef Josh Fidler of Fidler & Co. Craft Kitchen and Grocery also invites us to brave our shadows and come out for an evening of upscale rustic cuisine. The event will include a four-course meal of wintry comfort foods, beginning with an amuse-bouche (appetizer), followed by a warm Brussels sprout salad, Josh’s signature “Pork & Grits,” which uses pork from local Rettland Farm, and crème brûlée for dessert. This cozy supper will also feature local cheeses, dairy and eggs, and a few surprises.

“I love doing these dinners,” says Josh. “Interacting in an intimate dinner situation is amazing, and I love raising awareness of the great variety of local products that are available in our area.” Josh is excited to offer this particular dinner to support the Adams County Arts Council. “The arts have always been a huge part of my life, and I think it’s of the utmost importance to promote creativity.” Josh’s creativity is certainly apparent in the beautiful presentation of his dishes, as well as with the combination of ingredients he uses to produce such delicious meals.

Why local farms?

pork pastrami rettland farm

Pork pastrami from Rettland Farm

Josh feels it’s important to build long-standing and trusting relationships with one’s purveyors. He has been working with Beau Ramsburg at Rettland Farm (located right here in  Gettysburg) for the past four years. They share a strong working and personal relationship based on a mutual admiration of and commitment to responsible husbandry. All of Rettland Farm’s animals are pastured and free-range, and the farm does not use antibiotics. Ramsburg rotates his grazing plots so the land and vegetation can sustain itself, and he supplements the feed with non-GMO soybeans. “Beau does things the right way even though it’s not the easy way,” says Josh. All of Josh’s pork and chicken dinners served at Fidler & Co. feature meats from Rettland Farm. You learn more about Fidler & Co., including additional information about the local purveyors of their ingredients here.

Pomona's Trio Bret Crawford, saxophone; Lisa Cadigan, vocals; Marc Jalbert, guitar

Pomona’s Trio
Bret Crawford, saxophone; Lisa Cadigan, vocals; Marc Jalbert, guitar

For an additional dose of cozy atmosphere, this evening will also feature live music by local jazz group, Pomona’s Trio. Marc Jalbert (guitar), Bret Crawford (saxophone), and Lisa Cadigan (vocals) have been playing a combination of original tunes, jazz standards, and creative arrangements of popular music on Thursday nights at Fidler & Co. (formerly Pomona’s Bakery Café) since 2011. All three musicians cherish the time they spend together making music, so they jumped at the opportunity to support the ACAC with an evening of jazz alongside their friend and regular Thursday-night host, Josh Fidler. The group is very excited to have recently produced their first CD, which will be on sale at the event. You can also purchase it at Fidler & Co., the Gettysburg Baking Co. downtown, or online.

For more information or to make your reservation over the phone,
call (717) 334-5006.

You can also register online:  Mark your calendars and make your reservation for this event today!

Sunday, February 28 from 6 – 8 pm

Adams County Arts Council

125 S. Washington Street

Gettysburg, PA 17325

$80 members/$90 non-members

Jewelry to Spark A Memorial Scholarship Fund

Posted on: November 12th, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

By Caroline Johnson

Wendy Heiges Jewelry Show Fund Raiser

An Event to Benefit the New
Noreen Neitz ACAC Scholarship Fund for Young Adults

Thursday, November 19, 4:30-7:00 pm, ACAC Arts Education Center

Sparkling stars dust tail

“Creativity is a spark… it can be intensely satisfying when the flame catches and a new idea sweeps around the world.” –Jonah Lehrer

Isn’t this true? How satisfying does it feel to receive recognition for initiating a new idea? I think that this feeling could be applicable to many triumphs in life where inspiration is a driving force. In this case, a very special someone has motivated the Adams County Arts Council to create a scholarship fund that will enable young adults to enrich their lives through arts education.

IMG_2961

Noreen Neitz

There is no better way to establish this opportunity than by naming the fund in honor of the ever inspiring, Noreen Neitz. Noreen passed away in 2013 after a long battle with breast cancer. She lived a full, engaging, and faithful life in which she made a significant impact on those who were fortunate enough to know her. She was an advocate for the arts but most importantly, a staunch advocate for youth in the community.

I had the opportunity to speak with her dear friend Caryl Schmitz who is helping to coordinate this scholarship. Caryl spoke of Noreen’s presence of leadership in the community, her encouraging and caring nature, and her tenacity to seek out new opportunities in which to learn and gain new experiences. This last characteristic in particular provides an example of what an individual might expect to gain from an education at the Arts Council. This scholarship will be specifically geared toward young adults in the community who wish to take classes at the Arts Council but are not able to due to financial limitations.

Considering Noreen’s history of involvement with youth in the community, it is safe to assume that she would be fully supportive of this scholarship. It will provide a new and enriching educational experience for young adults in the community, a chance of which she might have taken advantage herself!

Wendy Heiges, Program Coordinator at the ACAC and freelance jewelry designer, felt supported and touched by Noreen’s vivacious and thoughtful spirit. Noreen seemingly loved Wendy’s jewelry, and could be seen more often than not sporting a pair of her hand-designed earrings! Caryl mentions that Noreen enjoyed expressing herself creatively and typically couldn’t resist indulging in pair of “fun” earrings!

For her love of creativity, education, and beautifully made jewelry, Wendy’s Jewelry Show Fundraiser is the perfect event to help raise awareness for this scholarship.

You will be sure to find something that is perfect for the special people in your life. Wendy’s hand IMG_8068designed jewelry will be on display offering an exciting variety of collections from which to choose. This display will include a limited edition pink quartz earring in honor of Noreen Neitz.

All proceeds will benefit the Noreen Neitz ACAC Scholarship Fund for Young Adults.

Stop by and shop for a great cause!

 

 

From Summer to Fall …

Posted on: September 1st, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

There’s been a crispness to the mornings recently, signaling the transition from summer to fall. Fall is my favorite time of year. I often bound forward into the autumn without looking back. However, this year seems a bit harder — How do you leave behind such a wonderful summer? ACAC Education Coordinator Wendy Heiges orchestrated a phenomenal summer of creative camps for our community. With all of the offerings, ACAC received glowing evaluations and cheers for wonderful teachers and projects. We’re so grateful for the treasures created and shared with the ACAC by our community of teachers and students. ACAC hosted 35 camps this summer for students ranging in ages from 3 to 15. Offerings included work with clay, paint, textiles, performing arts and culinary arts.

princesscooking camp2

IMG_1642

IMG_1542

IMG_1528
IMG_1476
IMG_1474
IMG_1371
IMG_1358
IMG_1345
IMG_1267

 

The pace in the halls of the Education Center will change with the seasons, of course. The mornings might be a bit quieter with children in school rather than cooking in our kitchen and dancing in the studio, but there’s plenty in store at ACAC for the fall, too. If your kids are back at school and you have some free time during the day, or if you need a break in the evening, you may want to check out a painting class. Can’t commit to a class over several weeks? Drop in for yoga on a Friday morning, join us for a paint and wine night, or register for the upcoming culinary event featuring Food 101’s Chef, Jennifer Williams, the local produce of 5 Points Market, RelishThis, Wine pairings by Caryl Schmitz and dessert by Beeman’s Bakery. This farm-to-table class and celebration, scheduled for October 8 from 6-8 p.m., is sure to be a deliciously fun evening, and it’s just one of many special events ACAC has planned for the fall.  Call 334-5006 or keep checking the web site for more information.

And of course, the halls will be bustling after 3 pm with plenty of after-school opportunities for our younger students. There’s never a shortage of creative activities to engage the kids after school. Click here for a list of after-school offerings.

As we transition from summer to fall, we thank you for your support and participation in the community treasure that is the Adams County Arts Council.

Onward!

What’s New this Summer? Castles, Doodles, Dinosaurs and more!

Posted on: May 29th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

Nearly 40 summer camps are “ready to roll” at the ACAC this summer! Wendy Heiges, Program Director at the ACAC, says the process of putting together children’s camps never ceases to amaze her.

“Every year the instructors propose even more imaginative, creative classes than the year before,” she explains. “This summer’s lineup includes many tried and true classic camps, but also many fantastic, new camps that draw on the incredible talents that our Adams County art teachers and artists will share with children of all ages.”

NEW summer camps for 2015 include:

fishSwim with the Fish! June 15-19 (ages 11-14), 1-4 pm  Paper Mache, that is!  Starting with a balloon, create a form out of paper mache that becomes your favorite whimsical or realistic fish. Throw your own style into this interesting project-there is no right or wrong!  Paint and embellish for pizzazz! Erica Woodworth $145 (member $135) Register

3D Architectural & Figurative Sculpture, June 22-26 (ages 11-14), 10-1 pm  Study & apply the architectural &sculptural work of Alberto Giacometti, Deborah Butterfield and Frank Gehr, to your own designs as you sculpt a human or animal figure and its habitat. Using basic sculptural techniques, create your 3D forms usingwire, plaster, paper mache& natural materials. Sally Becker$155 (member $145) Register

castleCastles, Castles, Castles, July 6-10 (ages 8-11), 1-4 pm  If you think castles are cool, join us for a week filled with castle exploration and construction.  Learn about the various features of castles and how they were improved during the Middle-Ages.  Build and decorate a castle using a variety of materials and found objects. Dawn Magee$155 (member $145) Register

From Doodle to Masterpiece, July 13th-17th (ages 9-12), 9-12 pm  Doodling is a fun way to create interesting artwork by using lines, patterns and your imagination.  Explore a variety of basic techniques in black and white, and enhance your doodles using colored pencils and markers.  Create a masterpiece by incorporating the doodling techniques learned.Joh Ricci  $155 (member $145) Register

doodle

Postcards from the Edge!  July 13-17 (ages 11-14), 1-4 pm  Create artwork postcards that tell your summer story.  Find your artistic style while learning the traditional format of a postcard-scrapbook style-using mixed media, photography, collage, paint and more.  Discover layering and composition techniques, working with ink resist and making your own collage papers.  Emily Hoponick$155 (member $145) Register

DinosaurDynamic Dinosaurs!July 20-24 (ages 5-7), 1-4 pm  Draw, paint & collage your way through the world of dinosaurs!  Your favorite dinosaurs will come to life as you workwith cool materials like oil pastels & metallic markers. Incorporate elements of design using patterns & textures.  Homemade dinosaur cookies & story time too!  Emily Hoponick$155 (member $145) Register

op artOp Art, July 20-24 (ages 10-12), 1-4 pm  Take a look at Op Art, a 1960s style of art that makes use of optical illusion and you’ll discover the math-based precise composition is designed to trick the eye.Create your own abstract designs, while learning new techniques as you learn about op-art artists and the movement. Kim Robinson $150 (member $140) Register

Pop Art,July 27-31 (ages 8-11), 9-12 pm  Explore the bright imagery of the pop art culture and create fun, vivid art work of objects that are meaningful to you while working with multi-media & various mediums.  Delve into self-portraits and icons of today too!  “Once you got pop, you can never see it the same way again.”  Melissa Jackson $155 (member $145) Register

tee peeThe Art of Native American StorytellingAugust 10-15 (ages 7-10), 1-4 p.m.  Using oil pastels, colored and watercolor pencils, draw and paint your interpretations of the fascinating creation stories and myths of the Native Americans. Become immersed in their vast culture and create artwork that tells your story.  Make traditional fry bread to celebrate! Emily Hoponick $155 (member $145) Register

The Art of Mask Making, August 10-14 (ages 8-11), 9-12 pm  Masks have been used throughout history for theatrical performances, royalty, ceremonies, hunting, portrait masks and more.  Apply layers of paper macheover a mask template to create your own unique cultural mask inspired by history.  Embellishments add to the fun!  Stanley Gilmore$155 (member $145) Register

Intermediate Guitar Workshop: Write Your Own Music, Saturday, August 8, 9-3 pm (13 and up) Have you been playing the guitar for a few years and are a beginning songwriter?  Learn to build your song and incorporate solos into the key you’re playing and writing.  Covers chord theory and scales, and hands-on demos.  Record what you’ve learned! Mark Wesling $150 (member $140)  Register

Chef Camp for Foodies, August 3-5 Intermediate skill level, (9 and up), 9-11 am, 9-11 am, and 9-noon  Do you love to experiment in the kitchen?  Addicted to cooking shows?  If you know the basics and would like to improve your skills and techniques, this is the camp for you.  We’ll play, “what’s in the cabinet,” develop new ways to create culinary successes with some tried and true ingredients, and put it all together for a 3rd day feast. Chris Rinehart, $106 ($102)Register

Build a House Out of Clay! July 13-17 (ages 9-11), 1-4 pm  Have fun with clay as you design and draw and build the house of your dreams!  Lay out the design on clay slab and create your own custom built 3D house.  Develop hand-building, sculpting technique, scale, and proportion skills. 4 days of clay building & 1 day of glazing.   Erica Woodworth $155 (member $145) Register

Check out the full listing of nearly 40 Summer Camps 2015 by clicking here and register your child(ren) today!

Or give a gift certificate to a special child in your life so that he/she can attend a summer camp (call 717-334-5006 to learn more) and please note that camp scholarships are available (click here for info–scroll down to “Children’s Summer Camps”).

 

 

Art and Music: Like PB & J

Posted on: May 20th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

PB&J

Peanut butter and jelly… peas and carrots… best friends like Bert and Ernie, Snoopy and Woodstock… Rock and roll…

These are all things that are linked together. What famous pairings come to mind for you?

How about art and music?

Wendy Heiges, Adams County Arts Council Program Director, believes the two art forms work together in perfect harmony.

“Music sets the mood and evokes emotions, inspires us, moves us and promotes artistic creativity,” she explains. “Music can serve as an incredible tool—consider how education is enhanced through music. For example, we all learn our ABCs by singing them to music.”

These are some of the reasons the ACAC is offering numerous Children’s Summer Camps that integrate art and music, offering children multi-sensory, creative experiences:

Start with Art for Pre-Schoolers, June 15-19 (ages 3-4), 9:30-11:30 am   Begin a lifelong passion for creativity by exploring art through music, movement, crafts, stories and more. Cultivate your child’s imagination and develop early learning skills while having fun with new friends and activities. A different theme every day!  Ann Walsh $105 (member $98) Register

Ballerinas & Bears, June 22-26 (ages 3-5), 9:30-11:30 am  If you’re a beginner ballerina or dancer, this fun-filled class is for you!  You’ll learn the elements of ballet and creative movement, wear your favorite costumes, and we’ll have a dancing teddy bear party and performance last camp day.  Hope VonSas $90 (member $83) Register

Turn Songs into Paintings, June 8-12 (ages 8-10), 9-12 pm  Do colors have sound? Can music become shapes? Learn how artist Kandinsky used shapes and colors as “notes” to make visual artwork. Create your own collection of unique paintings using watercolor, pastel, & printmaking skills while listening to music. Sally Becker $155 (member $145) Register

Check out the full listing of nearly 40 Summer Camps 2015 by clicking here and register your child(ren) today!

Or give a gift certificate to a special child in your life so that he/she can attend a summer camp (call 717-334-5006 to learn more) and please note that camp scholarships are available (click here for info–scroll down to “Children’s Summer Camps”).

 

 

Xuchialt Artists and Upper Adams High School Art Students featured in May

Posted on: April 30th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

Written by Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator

Nicaraguan Dancers

Nicaraguan Dancers

The Adams County Arts Council will showcase the artwork of five artists from the Taller Artistico Xuchialt of Leon, Nicaragua during the month of May in the Reception Hall at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center, 125 S. Washington Street.  The show will include artwork by students, Xuchialt teachers and Adams County artists.  A First Friday reception on May 15-7:30 p.m. will feature a 15 minute full costumed demonstration of traditional dance starting at 5:30 p.m.

The 5 Nicaraguan artists will feature artwork produced at the Taller Artistico Xuchialt School of Art, which is supported by Project Gettysburg-Leon.  The four year program is officially accredited by the Nicaraguan Ministry of Culture and teaches over 120 students each year.  Gina Robinson of Project Gettysburg-Leon says, “All of the teachers are volunteers. They do this for the love of art. It’s a very exciting thing for the arts community to have people so passionate about sharing their arts and culture.”

Marlon Moreno, Xuchialt artist

Marlon Moreno, Xuchialt artist

The Xuchialt artists are scheduled to teach a Primitivista Paint Night at the ACAC on Tuesday, May 5th, from 6-9 p.m. during their three week visit.  The evening will feature folkloric dancing, Nicaraguan folk music and primitivista painting, a bright and colorful form of Nicaraguan painting with common themes of flora, fauna, community life and historical events.  Robinson comments, “It’s a true cultural exchange.  They’re teaching us, we’re teaching them.  This is a chance to share in the growing friendship between Leon, and Adams County.”

The Upper Adams High School art students under the instruction of Lisa Harman will be showing their 2D and 3D artwork in the Studio at the Arts Education Center during the month of May, as well.  A May 1st First Friday student reception will be held in the studio from 5-7:00 p.m.  Their artwork will remain hanging through mid-June.

Upper Adams student work

Upper Adams student work

To register for the Primitivista Paint Night, or for more information about the Taller Artistico Xuchialt exhibit, the Upper Adams High School student show and other upcoming Arts Council exhibitions, news and events or art classes at the Arts Council’s Arts Education Center, visit www.adamsarts.org or call (717) 334-5006.

The Adams County Arts Council’s mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community.

Painting by Bryan Diaz

Painting by Bryan Diaz

Artist Spotlight: Melissa Swift and the Recyclable Art Contest

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

20150327_152842_resized“If you can see beauty in everything, you are an artist.” –Anonymous

Melissa Swift has been teaching art at Fairfield Elementary School since 2007, a position she filled after Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) Board Member Louise Garverick retired. Melissa credits Louise with connecting her to ACAC and introducing her to the Recyclable Art Contest and Exhibit, an event sponsored by the Gettysburg Recycling Committee and McDonald’s, which invites students across Adams County to submit pieces constructed entirely of recyclable materials. This year marks the show’s 20th year, making it the most long-lived event at the the ACAC.

Before inviting her students to showcase their work at ACAC, Melissa holds her own contest at Fairfield Elementary. Participation is voluntary – it’s not a graded project. The children work on their recyclable art projects at home, but the kids look forward to participating every year. She does set aside one day of class time to talk about why it’s important to recycle and to show examples of past projects, encouraging students to think about how they can turn someone else’s trash into an aesthetically pleasing treasure. This year, she discovered students had already started their projects before she even announced the contest. Fairfield Elementary’s contest boasts 48 entries this year, all of which will be invited to participate in the exhibit at ACAC. “There were actually fewer entries this year than last,” Melissa said, “but they are all of high quality, so they will all be invited to participate.” Melissa works hard to teach the children how to transform their work to its highest potential, worthy of aesthetic appreciation.

For the ACAC contest and exhibit, each student may submit one work of art that does not exceed a size of 36 inches in any direction, and that is constructed entirely of recyclable materials. The projects are rated by a panel of judges based on the following criteria:

Flowers

Claudia Bricker (2nd grade) points to her garden collage constructed with all recycled materials. Claudia received First place in 2014 in the Fairfield Elementary Show.

  • integration and transformation,
  • creativity, individuality, originality and uniqueness
  • and presentation.

Cash prizes are awarded to the top four entries in each of the following categories:

  • Grades K-2
  • Grades 3-5
  • Grades 6-8
  • Grades 9-12

One piece will be selected as
best in show.

Artists are invited to submit their projects on March 31 and April 1, and the show will open to the public for First Friday on April 3. Awards will be presented on Saturday, April 18. A People’s Choice award will also be presented – be sure to visit the show to cast your vote, and reinforce the message that if we stop to look long enough, there truly is beauty in everything.

Some photos of the Fairfield Elementary entries for 2015:

2015pieces

Artist Spotlight: Linda Fauth

Posted on: March 11th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks
Linda Fauth, "at home" in the ACAC's kitchen

Linda Fauth, “at home” in the ACAC’s kitchen

St. Patrick’s Day is upon us and seems like the perfect time to profile a culinary instructor who enjoys focusing on “spring greens.”

Linda Fauth, long-time consumer science (“home ec”) teacher, may be retired, but she is still enjoying sharing her culinary and creative skills with a new group of students of all ages, through classes at the ACAC.

A native of Red Lion, in nearby York County, Linda says she inherited many of her talents from her mother. “She was a great cook and seamstress,” Linda explains, “So the apple didn’t fall far from the tree!”

After graduating from Albright College with a degree in family & consumer science, a move to New Jersey, and the earning of her master’s degree in education, Linda settled in Adams County in 1978.

She taught numerous classes including culinary and nutrition classes to middle schoolers in the Upper Adams School District, for more than 30 years, retiring in 2011.

Since then, she has taught numerous adult and children’s classes at the ACAC, including a tofu workshop; one of the highlights was creating a chocolate silk pie made with tofu.

“I have good, standard recipes I’ve used for many years, but I’m always trying new things,” Linda says. “Cooking Light is my favorite book and magazine for discovering new recipes.”

A previous class participant

A previous class participant

Linda is always modifying her classes, especially to reflect the trend towards more healthful eating.

Her next class for adults, “Spring Market Cooking,” includes several recipes featuring kale, considered one of the healthiest, nutrient-dense foods.

Spring Market Cooking!  Thursday, May 14, 6-8:30 pm Learn creative ways to prepare healthy appetizers, entrees and desserts using kale, asparagus and spring’s lush bounty.  Prepare and eat a kale salad, Portuguese kale soup, fruit salsa, a light entrée and something sweet and sumptuous for dessert.  Linda Fauth, $45 ($42 member) Register

One of Linda's former ACAC students proudly displays her edible creation!

One of Linda’s former ACAC students proudly displays her edible creation!

Linda also enjoys teaching 9, 10 and 11-year olds, through summer arts camps at the ACAC. Three years in a row, she has taught students how to make kid-friendly dishes they can easily replicate at home: smoothies, soft pretzels, mini pizzas, macaroni and cheese, and more.

“Sewing is Fun” is another popular camp Linda has taught for several summers. She abides by a special motto when it comes to her students’ creations. “I always tell my students they should like their projects and finish them—I always stay after class to help students finish sewing their projects if need be.”

Here are Linda’s upcoming 2015 summer arts camps:

Sewing is Fun! July 27-31 (ages 9-11) 1-4 pm  Spend the week learning both hand and machine sewing skills and see how easy sewing can be… and fun too!  Choose your own fabric and create your very own chef’s apron, a tote bag, and decorative pillows. Linda Fauth $152 (member $142) Register

Cooks in the Kitchen July 20-24 (ages 9-11), 9-12 pm  Begin your journey into the culinary world by learning about nutritious fun foods. Develop confidence around the kitchen- learn about proper measurements, safety issues and what kitchen tools to use! Make favorites: soft pretzels, orange julius, ice cream, mac and cheese, and fresh salsa and more! Linda Fauth $160 ($150) Register

Previous "Sewing is Fun" campers

Previous “Sewing is Fun” campers

One of Linda's previous kids' cooking camps

One of Linda’s previous kids’ cooking camps

Previous "Sewing is Fun" campers

Previous “Sewing is Fun” campers

Spending time in the kitchen isn’t a chore to Linda: “The kitchen here (at the ACAC) is awesome—it’s so easy to set up and involve the class in the cooking process. Afterwards, there’s plenty of room for us to eat as well!”

When she’s not cooking at the ACAC, Linda enjoys spending time as a food and wellness volunteer through the Penn State Extension Service, making presentations to schools, business meetings, and other groups. One of their current programs is called Dining with Diabetes.

She also enjoys sewing for her grandchildren; her latest creations have included dresses, a Hawaiian shirt, a puppet theater, and alphabet charts.

Linda says her favorite, prized recipe of all time is a family recipe that’s been handed down for generations, for sticky buns. But she also enjoys making sourdough starter, baking bread, cakes, cookies and cream puffs.

Her neighbors likely consider themselves very lucky. She says she often shares her culinary creations with them—but along with those tasty treats comes a request: She always asks for their honest feedback on all new recipes. Sounds like a delicious relationship!

Linda Fauth IMG_9031

An ABC chart Linda made for her grandchildren

 

 

 

 

Artist Spotlight: Anna (Fetter) Robison

Posted on: March 2nd, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

Anna-fettucine-handsCulinary Arts Instructor Anna (Fetter) Robison Shows How Food Is Art, Appealing to All of our Senses

I first met Anna (Fetter) Robison when she was the head chef at Pomona’s Woodfired Bakery Café (now Fidler & Co. Custom Kitchen) in Biglerville.  From the beginning, her talents in the culinary arts were obvious: the restaurant was always filled with people and delicious smells – the aromas were just a teaser to the tastes that followed. It was also impressive to watch her craft beautiful and tasty dishes while managing a kitchen staff often made up of her siblings. The oldest of six, Anna grew up in Cashtown with a strong sense of family. Watching her run a kitchen, it was obvious she and her brothers and sisters hold each other in high regard and with mutual respect. She runs a tight ship, but acknowledges, “Yelling isn’t good for anyone. Respect is a two-way street.”

Anna left Pomona’s to focus on time with her family, and she approaches parenting in the same no-nonsense, fun-loving, mutually respectful way she runs a kitchen. Mom to a precocious and adorable five-year-old who also loves to cook, once a week Anna encourages her daughter Emily’s creative exploration by allowing “experimental soups” for dinner, which Emily makes and serves to the grown-ups. Anna respectfully tastes whatever is served. After all, if Emily is expected to eat what is in front of her, Anna feels it is important to offer the same respect. That said, Anna admitted with a smirk that when her daughter’s “soups” are too difficult to choke down, she and her husband might creatively distract Emily before cleaning their plates in the sink. Some day they will all laugh about this together.

Cooking adventures with her daughter have inspired many of the children’s classes Anna teaches for the Adams County Arts Council. Earlier this year, she offered a Mommy & Me Frozen-themed cooking class, inspired by the popular movie. This summer, she is excited to offer a Princess Cooking Camp, where students will be introduced to cuisines paired with the appropriate princesses, including dishes like New Orleans-style jambalaya, inspired by Tiana of The Princess and the Frog and a sea-foam smoothie and shell pasta salad, inspired by Ariel of The Little Mermaid.

pasta-dishIn addition to her wonderful work with kids, Anna is also a culinary artist with much to offer adults. Her specialties include fresh pasta and seafood dishes. These evening classes can be a great alternative to a typical night at a restaurant – students enjoy a social evening of learning, interaction and great food. The experience offers food that is not only delicious, it’s also beautiful. Tantalizing smells fill the classroom-kitchen. The culinary arts allow students to experience food with all five senses, making it a uniquely appealing art form.

Anna is thoroughly enjoying her teaching experiences at ACAC, and she aspires to teach full-time some day. A graduate of the Gettysburg High School Tech Prep Culinary Arts program, she had all good things to say about her experience there, and would ultimately love to return as a full-time instructor. In the meantime, you can find her working at Hickory Bridge Farm, a family-style restaurant in Ortanna, and teaching all she can at ACAC.

A Taste of Anna’s Talents

Anna-pastamachineIs this article making your mouth water? Come see Anna on Tuesday, March 10 at 6 pm, when she offers Pasta, Pasta, Pasta! Students will learn to make delicious pasta dough for ravioli and lasagna, as well as a collection of sauce recipes. Register here!

Anna has also graciously volunteered to coordinate the catering and food service for the ACAC’s upcoming event, Glitter and Glue: An Evening with Kelly Corrigan on March 20. This promises to be an exciting evening of good food, live music, and a wonderful presentation and book signing by NY Times best-selling author Kelly Corrigan. The event is part of Corrigan’s “Glitter and Glue for Good,” (#ggforgood) benefitting a variety of non-profits across the United States. Register here!

Fight Cabin Fever with the ACAC

Posted on: January 5th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

Cold January days are here, but the arts council had two fantastic events this weekend that can help you combat “cabin fever:”

Have movie moxie? Let your trivia skills shine at our Jan 9 Trivia Contest!

Have movie moxie? Let your trivia skills shine at our Jan 9 Trivia Contest!

The Pike Restaurant, 985 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg, will offer a special Trivia Contest on Friday, January 9, from 6-8 p.m. to benefit the Adams County Arts Council.  Draft a team of up to eight players or join a team that evening and test your general knowledge of subjects like pop culture, sports, history, movies, geography, music and literature.  Cost to play is a $10 donation per person to the Arts Council. Each member of the winning team receives a $20 gift card from The Pike. For more information about the trivia contest or to reserve a table, contact the Pike at 717 334-9227.  For more information about Arts Council classes, programs or membership, contact 717-334-5006aa@adamsarts.org, or visit adamsarts.org.

It Happened One Summer by Dianne Lorden

It Happened One Summer by Dianne Lorden

Eight accomplished artists, members of the Gettysburg or Susquehanna Valley Plein Air Painters groups, will be coming in out of the cold for a Plein Air Paint-In at the Center on Saturday, January 10. From 10 a.m. to 12 noon, you’re invited to see how these artists approach a plein air-type painting and watch as different interpretations of the same bouquet or still life emerge.  The paintings, which may be purchased either framed or unframed, will go on sale from noon to 2 p.m.

Enjoy hot beef vegetable, carrot ginger or crab soup (eat-in or take-out) served up by Arts Council members. You may also choose to purchase soup in hand-carved stoneware bowls by potter Lori Nelson.

There is no admission charge for the event. The artists, all of whom are donating their sales to the Arts Council, include event organizer Barb Ebaugh, Cortez Lawrence, Paul J. Gallo, Claire Beadon Carnell, Larry Lerew, James Bricker, Kim Stone and Dianne Lorden.

Snow date for the Paint-In is Saturday, January 24.

The Arts are a Gift for Future Generations

Posted on: December 17th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

GiveNow

In the world of education, where test scores are often valued above participation in the arts, we are losing sight of the fact that academic success depends on creative thinking.  According to pbs.org and a report by Americans for the Arts, “young people who participate regularly in the arts (three hours a day on three days each week through one full year) are four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement, to participate in a math and science fair or to win an award for writing an essay or poem than children who do not participate.” A Gallup study on entrepreneurship concluded creative thinking is the crucial trait shared among successful entrepreneurs.  Also reported on pbs.org, “A study published in 2007 by Christopher Johnson, professor of music education and music therapy at the University of Kansas, revealed that students in elementary schools with superior music education programs scored around 22 percent higher in English and 20 percent higher in math scores on standardized tests, compared to schools with low-quality music programs, regardless of socioeconomic disparities among the schools or school districts.”

If we know the arts are responsible for building future generations of creative thinkers (not to mention, happier people), shouldn’t we invest in that endeavor?

Preschoolers work on their Hungry Caterpillar books

Preschoolers work on their Hungry Caterpillar books

In 2014, at the Adams County Arts Council provided enriching arts experiences for:

  • 246 pre-K children, who will likely be better prepared to thrive in a school environment than peers who did not participate in such programs;
  • 299 summer campers, who developed their minds and bodies with movement classes, culinary classes, painting, textiles, clay and collage;
  • 174 high school and middle school students, who enjoyed after-school classes in the new Eat Smart – Play Hard program, which teaches the benefit of good nutrition with a creative twist;
    Adult students enjoy a Paint & Wine evening with Marie Betlyon Smith

    Adult students enjoy a Paint & Wine evening class

  • 1,558 students, who enjoyed artistic experiences with Artists-in-residence; and
  • 663 adults, who continued on a journey of lifelong learning through a variety of art classes.

Twenty-two percent of the children who took classes did so on a full scholarship, thanks to ACAC’s commitment to provide access to lower income families.

These gifts given to our community by the Adams County Arts Council are trends to build upon.  So we are asking you to please give back, and pass it on.

Give Back…And Pass it On
From December 16 – 18
, ACAC will be raising funds online to ensure the continued ability to provide our community with enriching experiences, activities and educational opportunities.  Our goal is to raise $7,200 in 72 hours, and you can help.

  1. Give Back.
    There are plenty of reasons to say thank you, and your gift helps ensure the continued creative spirit that thrives in our community.
  2. Pass It On.
    Share this article with everyone you know!  Use social media accounts, and email your entire address book.  The more engaged our community becomes, the more the arts will thrive. And the more the arts thrive, the richer all of our lives become.
  3. Stay Tuned. Watch and share our Facebook and Twitter posts from December 16-18, as we track the progress of the campaign.  The more you help share the news, the more successful we will all be! Also, if you haven’t already, please subscribe to our email list (enter your email address in the upper right hand corner of this page).  Learn about all of the opportunities ACAC has for you throughout the year.
Kelly Corrigan (Photo Credit: Betsy Barnes)

Kelly Corrigan (Photo Credit: Betsy Barnes)

We thank you in advance for your gift. Donors of $50 or more will receive recognition on the blog and in a special holiday email greeting following the campaign. Givers of $250 or more will be entered into a raffle for a free class at the ACAC this January or for a ticket to our upcoming event with NY Times Best-selling Author Kelly Corrigan in March.

Enjoy this season of giving!

 

css.php