Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County, PA

Archive for the ‘Fundraisers’ Category

‘Tis the Season for our Holiday Show & Sale

Posted on: November 20th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Article by Elle Lamboy, ACAC Marketing & Development Committee

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The chewy bite of an iced sugar cookie. Red cups at Starbucks. The undeniable scent of pine.  Carols singing on the radio while bells ring in the street. Quality time with food, family and friends.

These festive traditions ignite a certain kind of magic, often juxtaposed by a more stressful reality of holiday shopping.

Fortunately, the Adams County Arts Council’s (ACAC) annual Holiday Show and Sale transforms the frantic buzzkill of holiday shopping into an enjoyable art.

The Show & Sale features about 50 member artists who will have the rare opportunity to “showcase a collection of their work as opposed to just one piece,” says Wendy Heiges, Program Director at the ACAC. “It gives local artists a platform to sell and exhibit their work that they wouldn’t have otherwise.”

This year promises a wonderfully eclectic collection with something creative for everyone on your shopping list—including photography, pottery, stationary, hand-painted ornaments, centerpieces, textiles, jewelry and so much more. A full list of participating artists can be found here.

singingThe Holiday Show & Sale will officially kick off on First Friday, December 5, from 5:00 p.m. -7:30 p.m. This festive and fun reception will feature holiday confections, music from Pomona’s Trio (left, featuring ACAC Board Member Lisa Cadigan on vocals, ACAC culinary instructor Marc Jalbert on guitar, and Gettysburg College professor Bret Crawford on saxophone), carols from the Gettysburg Children’s Choir High School Ensemble, and the opportunity to get first dibs on hand-crafted, local gifts.

Your patronage not only supports local artists in the community; it also helps the ACAC, which will receive a 40% commission for all gifts and artwork purchased.

To get a head start on your holiday shopping, the ACAC will be open for “sneak previews” of the show beginning Tuesday, November 25.  Please visit our website to view our extended holiday hours and schedule or give us a call. For your convenience, the Show & Sale is featured in the reception hall this year which is located just left of the entrance to the Center.

The ACAC’s  annual Holiday Show and Sale channels all that is wonderful about the holidays—the joy of giving, the awakening of the senses and the importance of giving back to our community—leaving the crowds and chaos behind!

You’ll be pleasantly surprised at all we have in store, and may even find your inner artist in the process.

Stay tuned to our blog for updates throughout the sale, including special demos from participating artists!

Questions?  Call (717) 334-5006.

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All Set for a “Mad” Masquerade Party

Posted on: September 30th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

Don’t you just love the word “masquerade?” According to Merriam-Webster:

Masquerade – 

a :  a social gathering of persons wearing masks and often fantastic costumes
b :  a costume for wear at such a gathering

2:  an action or appearance that is mere disguise or show

Origin of MASQUERADE: Middle French, from Old Italian dialect mascarada, from Old Italian maschera mask; first known use: 1587

What a rich history, and what a colorful word!

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Here at the Adams County Arts Council, the annual Masquerade Party has become a tradition–14 years strong, this year, and it never fails to be a colorful event that features many colorful characters.

Be sure to join us for the 14th Annual CenturyLink Masquerade Party this year, set for October 24. “Alice in Disco Wonderland” is the theme, featuring live music by the Colgan-Hirsh Band with the Slammin’ Horms. Costume or formal wear/mask is requested. Held at the elegant Gettysburg Hotel, 1 Lincoln Square, this event is one of the arts council’s major annual fundraisers. Secure a dinner/party combo ticket (7 pm) or party-only ticket (8 pm) through this link. (Hint: make sure your computer or phone volume is up, when you click on the link.)

There are some fantastic possibilities for this year’s costumes! To give everyone a helping hand, here are some “mad” brainstorming ideas along the Alice in Wonderland, as well as the Disco, themes:

  • Alice (of course!)
  • The White Rabbit
  • Tea party
  • The Mad Hatter
  • Queen of Hearts
  • Cheshire Cat
  • 1970s Disco era
  • Saturday Night Fever
  • The Village People
  • KC & the Sunshine Band

And for a fun trip down memory lane, let’s rewind the clock to 2010. I turned to fellow ACAC Marketing Committee member Nanette Hatzes, who snapped dozens of pics at the 10th Annual event, which featured a fun Hollywood theme. Enjoy some of her highlights!

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– All photos courtesy Nanette Hatzes

Fall Fiesta Mixes Fun with Fundraiser

Posted on: August 21st, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

Four things that Judy Pyle is most passionate about include the arts, parties, people and pies. (More on her pies, in a moment….) The longtime ACAC supporter is throwing one of her biggest parties in about a month—inviting the public to enjoy her Fall Fiesta—and all to benefit the arts council.

“This is the 11th annual Fall Fiesta,” Pyle explains. “Not only is it a fundraiser for the arts council, but it’s also a great way to spend a Friday evening after work.”

Set for Friday, September 26 from 5-8 pm, the Fiesta celebrates the first Friday of fall with a Mexican themed supper and drinks. Pyle says tacos are a staple of the menu—with endless possibilities for combinations of fillings—as well as traditional Mexican rice, beans, guacamole, plenty of salsa and chips, and more. Plenty of lively conversation, plus music by the Klinger McFry Band will add to the festive atmosphere.

The setting is Pyle’s meticulously-maintained grounds and gardens, surrounding her Gettysburg home, featuring tents and spacious seating areas. How fitting that attendees will be heading “south of the border” onto South Howard Avenue for her Fiesta—she laughingly refers to her address as “Gettysburg’s SoHo.”

Judy Pyle's beautifully-maintained gardens

Judy Pyle’s beautifully-maintained gardens

The Fall Fiesta also includes a silent auction featuring one-of-a-kind art and exclusive items. She says prizes in the past have included incredible art as well as trips such as the chance to go sailing on the Chesapeake Bay. As a jewelry artist, Pyle always contributes a pair of her hand-crafted silver earrings.

What drives Pyle’s love of the arts and determination to give back to the arts community?

“I taught art for 35 years,” she says, “So I know how important the arts are to life, to the community, to people who want their children to grow and go onto college. Art is a language, a problem-solving exercise—it expands minds. And the ACAC is all-inclusive in our community.”

Pyle says she’s been an arts council member since the organization’s inception, more than 20 years ago. She’s thrilled to host the Fall Fiesta for the 11th year, as a way to support the non-profit ACAC and keep the arts flourishing throughout Adams County.

RSVP for the Fall Fiesta today:

  • $25 per person
  • Requested by September 24
  • Can be made online (click here) or in person at the arts council, 125 S. Washington Street, Gettysburg
  • Admission at the door will be $30
  • Event-goers must be at least 21

You will also see Pyle’s name among the many talented instructors teaching adult classes at the arts council this fall. And here’s where her love of pies comes in…

Judy's apple crumb pie... fresh from the oven

Judy’s apple crumb pie… fresh from the oven

“Not everybody knows how to make pies,” Pyle explains. “I grew up at the elbow of both of my grandmothers and it was great training for me, learning how to make pies. They were known for their pies, so I’m sharing their recipes through my classes offered at the arts council.”

You’re welcome to join Pyle, not only for the Fall Fiesta, but for her upcoming classes as well:

My Grandmothers’ Pies : Peach  – Thursday, August 21, 6:00-8:30 pm

Members of the class will be greeted by the aroma of baking pies as they enter the state-of-the-art chef’s kitchen.  Learn how to make the unbeatable combination of flaky dough and rich peach filling from local artisan and pie baker, Judy Pyle.  Learn tips on how to put a crust together, make it, roll it out, ready for the pie pan and the luscious filling to follow.  Your pie will be ready to bake or freeze when you leave.  Enjoy a pie that’s ready to be shared after instruction!  Judy Pyle  $38 (members $35) Register thru Paypal

Block Printing-Making Workshop – Saturdays, October 11-18, 10:00 am -3:00 pm

Learn how to make block prints using classic techniques.  While the process is simple, the lino print can be as subtle and simple, or as intricate as the artist wants.  Bring along ideas to the first class, and use as a catalyst to produce new and exciting artwork!  Materials provided. Judy Pyle and Andrea Theisson   $139 (members $126) Register thru Paypal

My Grandmothers’ Pies – Apple: Thursday, October 16, 6:00-8:30 pm

Members of the class will be greeted by the aroma of baking pies as they enter the state-of-the-art chef’s kitchen.  Learn how to make the unbeatable combination of flaky dough and rich filling from local artisan and pie baker, Judy Pyle.  Learn tips on how to put a crust together, make it, roll it out, ready for the pie pan and the luscious filling to follow.  Your pie will be ready to bake or freeze when you leave.  Enjoy a pie that’s ready to be shared after instruction! Judy Pyle  $38 (members $35) Register thru Paypal

 

Get to Know the 19-Year Old Stars of “Tarzan”

Posted on: July 28th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

One More Weekend of Upcoming Performances: August 1-3 at the Eichelberger 

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Dakota Haines, 19, of York, stars in Acts of Kindness Theatre Company’s summer production, Tarzan the Stage Musical, coming to Hanover’s Eichelberger Theatre, 195 Stock Street, for a second weekend on August 1, 2, and 3. The show is based upon the beloved character in Disney’s 1999 film and Edgar Rice Burrough’s classic book Tarzan of the Apes.

Tarzan and Jane, played by Dakota Haines of York and Zoe Wildasin of Hanover lead an impressive regional cast assembled for Tarzan® the Stage Musical, the featured 2014 summer production by Acts of Kindness (AOK) Theatre Company with proceeds funneled directly back into the community via non-profit donations.

Performances are slated for Hanover’s Eichelberger Performing Arts Center on July 25, 26 and 27; and August 1, 2, and 3. Acts of Kindness Director Rene Staub says Tarzan fits the bill as the perfect show to celebrate the theatre company’s 10th anniversary show. “It’s a classic story, but the musical is done in a unique way. The show will make kids in the audience laugh, but adults will laugh at things that are over the kids’ heads. Disney does a great job with that—there’s something for everyone in this show.”

Heading up the 40-plus-member cast is York’s 19-year old Dakota Haines as Tarzan. Haines, a 2013 graduate of Dallastown Area High School, is a sophomore at Penn State University who will be auditioning for the school’s prestigious musical theatre program in the fall.

“Tarzan is a challenging role, but also a lot of fun,” Haines says. “To be acting very ridiculous and ape-like on stage and still have family, friends and the local community come out to support me… it’s very endearing,” he laughs.

Haines says music has always been a part of his life, nurtured by experiences with concert and symphonic band, as well as marching with the drum line, singing with York County Junior and Senior Honors Choir, and snagging leading roles in Dallastown High School’s musicals such as Legally Blonde and Hairspray. He is currently a member of an a cappella group as well as the acclaimed Blue Band at Penn State.

Tarzan is Haines’ first performance with AOK Theatre Company, unlike his co-star Zoe Wildasin, also 19, whose role as Jane marks her ninth consecutive summer show with AOK. She lists Titanic, CATS and Hairspray as some of her favorite past shows with AOK. But playing the role of Jane in Tarzan offers Wildasin the opportunity to show AOK’s audience how she has matured over the years.

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Hanover’s Zoe Wildasin, 19, plays the role of Jane in Acts of Kindness Theatre Company’s summer production, Tarzan the Stage Musical, coming to Hanover’s Eichelberger Theatre, 195 Stock Street, for a second weekend, August 1, 2, and 3. The Spring Grove graduate is marking her ninth summer production with AOK.

“It’s a fun part because Jane is very mature,” Wildasin explains. “But at the same time, she’s also inquisitive which makes her youthful.”

A 2013 graduate of Spring Grove High School, Wildasin is currently a sophomore at Chicago’s DePaul University, majoring in public relations/advertising with a minor in theatre studies. She says being involved in nine of the ten past AOK productions gives her a unique perspective.

“Everyone involved in the show is a volunteer,” she says. “It’s a great group of people giving a lot of hard work and time. But from the audience’s perspective, it looks like a professional company and every year there’s a greater quality to the show. People expect more from us every year, and hopefully this year with Tarzan we’ll deliver again.”

Background:

Based upon Edgar Rice Burrough’s book Tarzan of the Apes and the 1999 smash-hit Disney animated film, Tarzan tells the story of an infant boy orphaned on the shores of West Africa. Taken in and raised by a tribe of gorillas, the young boy strives for acceptance by his ape father while grappling with his uniqueness. When a human expedition enters their territory, Tarzan—now a man—encounters strangers like himself for the first time.

Proceeds:

Tarzan proceeds benefit Addy’s Team (Cystic Fibrosis), as well as the non-profit Adams County Arts Council, whose mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. Executive Director Chris Glatfelter says proceeds from AOK’s summer shows are some of the largest contributions the arts council receives annually.

Tickets:

Contact the Eichelberger Box Office, 195 Stock Street, Hanover, Monday-Friday, 10 am-2 pm, or online anytime at www.theeich.org, or by calling the box office at 717-637-7086. Advance tickets are $12 for students/children and $16 for adults. Premium seating is also available for $19. On performance days, ticket prices are $2 more. A group rate of $12 per ticket applies to groups of 15 or more attending the same performance.

For more information: See www.aoktheatre.com.

 

AOK’s 10th Anniversary Show, TARZAN, “Flies” to New Heights

Posted on: July 21st, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

Acts of Kindness Theatre Company Returns July 25-27; August 1- 3              

Special effects, acrobatics and even flying stunts, are being perfected in the days leading up to performances of Tarzan® the Stage Musical, the featured 2014 summer production by Acts of Kindness (AOK) Theatre Company, presenting regional talent ranging in age from 6-60+ and benefitting the non-profit Adams County Arts Council.

Performances are slated for Hanover’s Eichelberger Performing Arts Center on July 25, 26 and 27; and August 1, 2, and 3. AOK Director Rene Staub says Tarzan, the company’s banner 10th anniversary show, is sure to dazzle audiences with its innovative choreography.

“Acrobatics and dancing are central to the story of Tarzan,” Staub explains. “It’s a primal body language that’s very organic. The cast’s movements are very believable—(choreographer) Dawn Glass has done a great job with that.”

Glass, Artistic Director at Gettysburg’s Vibe Performing Arts Studio, says a total of 15 cast members will be “flying” during the performances.

“We are working with one of the biggest flying companies in the U.S. to install the rigging and train us. They ‘fly’ people in LA, in movies, and they tell us that what we’re doing in Tarzan right here in Hanover is typically done in the Broadway show,” according to Glass.

“Different apparatus will help the actors fly, flip and jump out of trees,” she explains. “Some are cables installed straight down from the ceiling, while some are like bungees with someone in the wings doing the controlling. There will also be three pendulums with movement like grandfather clock pendulums, so that Tarzan and the dancers can swing from vine to vine. Everything is completely customized to each of our actors’ and dancers’ height and weight.”

Simple movements on stage are actually anything but simple—the cast has spent weeks researching and practicing the movement of apes. “We have studied everything from Zoo Life videos to Planet of the Apes and YouTube videos,” Glass says. “It’s been amazing to watch the cast transform—their movements look so natural now. Audiences are going to forget there are actually humans inside the costumes.”

Dakota Haines, 19, of York, playing the lead role of Tarzan, works on ape-like movements on stage with Donovan Yaukey of Shippensburg, who plays “young Tarzan,” in this summer’s Acts of Kindness Theatre Company’s Tarzan the Stage Musical

Dakota Haines, 19, of York, playing the lead role of Tarzan, works on ape-like movements on stage with Donovan Yaukey of Shippensburg, who plays “young Tarzan,” in this summer’s Acts of Kindness Theatre Company’s Tarzan the Stage Musical

This 10th anniversary show is also musically challenging. “The orchestra features 12 local musicians,” according to musical director Brian Buterbaugh. “However, the complex African beats require us to have five drummers, instead of two as we normally have.”

“Musical highlights certainly include Phil Collins’ Grammy Award-winning song ‘You’ll Be in My Heart’ which everyone will recognize and is beautifully orchestrated,” says Buterbaugh. “There are several big chorus numbers with everyone on stage, spectacles for both the eyes and ears.”

Background:

Based upon Edgar Rice Burrough’s book Tarzan of the Apes and the 1999 smash-hit Disney animated film, Tarzan tells the story of an infant boy orphaned on the shores of West Africa. Taken in and raised by a tribe of gorillas, the young boy strives for acceptance by his ape father while grappling with his uniqueness. When a human expedition enters their territory, Tarzan—now a man—encounters strangers like himself for the first time.

Starring:

Heading up the 40-plus-member cast is York’s 19-year old Dakota Haines as Tarzan and Hanover’s 19-year old Zoe Wildasin as Jane. Haines, a graduate of Dallastown Area High School, is currently a student at Penn State University; Wildasin is a graduate of Spring Grove Area High School who attends Chicago’s DePaul University.

Proceeds:

Tarzan proceeds benefit Addy’s Team (Cystic Fibrosis), as well as the non-profit Adams County Arts Council, whose mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. Executive Director Chris Glatfelter says proceeds from AOK’s summer shows are some of the largest contributions the arts council receives annually.

Tickets:

Contact the Eichelberger Box Office, 195 Stock Street, Hanover, Monday-Friday, 10 am-2 pm, or online anytime at www.theeich.org, or by calling the box office at 717-637-7086. Advance tickets are $12 for students/children and $16 for adults. Premium seating is also available for $19. On performance days, ticket prices are $2 more. A group rate of $12 per ticket applies to groups of 15 or more attending the same performance.

For a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the show, click here for our Facebook photo album!

Acrobatic “Tarzan the Stage Musical” Swings into Eichelberger Theatre

Posted on: July 10th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

Performances Slated for July 25, 26, 27; August 1, 2, 3 

Tarzan the Stage Musical - Logo

Described as “acrobatic, innovative, entertaining and family-oriented,” Tarzan® the Stage Musical is the featured 2014 summer production by Acts of Kindness (AOK) Theatre Company, presenting regional talent ranging in age from 6-60+ and benefitting the non-profit Adams County Arts Council.

Performances are slated for Hanover’s Eichelberger Performing Arts Center on July 25, 26 and 27; and August 1, 2, and 3. Rene Staub returns as show director; his wife Jessica Staub returns production coordinator. Together, the pair heads up Acts of Kindness Theatre Company, which formed ten years ago in order to present a quality summer production that would also give back to regional nonprofit organizations such as the arts council.

“For the 10th anniversary show, we were looking for something celebratory and family-oriented from Disney,” explains Rene Staub. “Since Tarzan is a fairly new release to community theatre, it allows us to offer something fresh and extremely innovative to the area audience.”

“The story of Tarzan will pull at the audience’s heartstrings, and the show overall will dazzle them—through effects, acrobatics—with cast members swinging from vine to vine, innovative dancing, beautifully lush sets, and moving music by Phil Collins including the Grammy Award-winning song ‘You’ll Be in My Heart.’ It’s going to be a full experience.”

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(Click here for “You’ll Be in My Heart” on YouTube)

Based upon Edgar Rice Burrough’s book Tarzan of the Apes and the 1999 smash-hit Disney animated film, Tarzan tells the story of an infant boy orphaned on the shores of West Africa. Taken in and raised by a tribe of gorillas, the young boy strives for acceptance by his ape father while grappling with his uniqueness. When a human expedition enters their territory, Tarzan—now a man—encounters strangers like himself for the first time.

Dakota Haines as Tarzan FB

Dakota Haines, 19, of York, stars in Acts of Kindness Theatre Company’s summer production, Tarzan the Stage Musical.

Heading up the 40-plus-member cast is York’s 19-year old Dakota Haines as Tarzan. Haines, a graduate of Dallastown Area High School, is currently a student at Penn State University. Dawn Glass of Gettysburg’s Vibe Performing Arts Studio is show choreographer.

The producers are quick to point out that it takes talent of all ages to create a successful production. “I think some of the most valuable performing experiences occur when kids, teens and adults perform side by side,” says Jessica Staub. “That happens on stage, as well as backstage and in our orchestra. It’s truly a team effort.”

AOK’s productions typically attract an audience ranging between 2,500 and 4,000 over the two weekend-run. Organizers project Tarzan will be on the high end of that range due to two main factors—Tarzan’s wide appeal, and a switch to the professional grade venue, Hanover’s Eichelberger Performing Arts Center. Previous shows were held at New Oxford High School, and while organizers continue to enjoy a wonderful relationship with the school, the district’s decreased summer staffing would not support AOK’s 2014 show.

Tarzan proceeds benefit the non-profit ACAC, whose mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. Executive Director Chris Glatfelter says proceeds from AOK’s summer shows are some of the largest contributions the arts council receives annually.

“Grateful does not even begin to describe how we, as a staff and board, feel every year when we partner with Acts of Kindness Theatre Company,” Glatfelter says. “Vital arts education faces severe cuts in our public schools, and we strive to fill this gap by offering quality arts instruction, bringing enriching arts performances to public schools and the community, and instilling an appreciation for the arts among audiences of all ages. It is a challenge, especially economically, but with generous support such as that from AOK, we continue to meet our mission.”

Tickets to Tarzan can be obtained through the Eichelberger Box Office, 195 Stock Street, Hanover, Monday-Friday, 10 am-2 pm, or online anytime at www.theeich.org, or by calling the box office at 717-637-7086. Advance tickets are $12 for students/children and $16 for adults. Premium seating is also available for $19. On performance days, ticket prices are $2 more. A group rate of $12 per ticket applies to groups of 15 or more attending the same performance.

Hope to see you at the show! 

 

Raise a Glass (or a Mug)… for the ACAC

Posted on: June 13th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

It’s said that the simple things in life are what provide the greatest joys. For those of you who are coffee drinkers, you know what I’m talking about. There is nothing like starting the day with that inticing aroma of freshly-brewed coffee… adding your favorite blend of sweeteners or cream (or boldly “taking it black”), and then enjoying those delicious, cutting-through-the-haze sips (or gulps—depending on how quickly you need your caffeine fix!)

Perhaps actor Hugh Jackman summarizes it best:

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If you’re a coffee lover (and according to USA Today, 83% of all American adults are)… now your simple morning cup o’ joe can even benefit the Arts Council. That’s right, simply by drinking your coffee, you can help support the arts in Adams County. Heck, have a second or third cup! (Again, according to USA Today, the average American adult enjoys three cups a day.)

Image courtesy of Apple's Eyes Studio / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Apple’s Eyes Studio / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Introducing the ACAC’s Bean Club!

Here’s how it works: The ACAC is partnering with Gettysburg’s Ragged Edge Coffee House (110 Chambersburg Street) to offer nine delicious, fair trade, coffee blends through the ACAC Bean Club. Orders can be placed through the Arts Council every month, prior to the 15th of the month. The cost is $10.50 per pound, which is a savings from the retail price of $12 per pound when purchased directly through the Ragged Edge, plus proceeds benefit the ACAC. This month , since June 15 falls on the Sunday, orders will be accepted at the ACAC through Monday, June 16.

 

Here’s the list of tantalizing coffee blends being offered:

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

  • Direct Trade, Organic Honduran Marcala
  • Fair Trade, Organic Guatemalan
  • Fair Trade, Organic Bolivian Caranavi
  • Fair Trade Costa Rican Tarrazu
  • Indonesian Karo Highlands
  • Rwandan Buliza
  • Ethiopian
  • Brazilian
  • Columbian
  • Nicaraguan
  • South American Decaf Blend
  • Salted Caramel
  • Baileys Irish Cream
  • Birthday Cake
  • Coconut
  • French Vanilla
  • Hazelnut
Image courtesy of Ambro / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Ambro / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Click here for descriptions of the flavors, plus ordering info.  

Be sure to raise your morning mug with a “Cheers” to the ACAC! What a simple gesture and easy way for “your habit” to benefit the ACAC—many thanks!

And here are two upcoming Bean Club events to add to your calendar:

First Friday, August 1: Between 5-7:30 pm, festivities will include a coffee tasting plus you can meet coffee roaster Chad Close, Ragged Edge Roasting Company, and grower Emilio Garcia!

Thirdthursdaynoon Brown Bag Lunch Series, Thursday, August 21: “The Politics of Coffee” – Fair Trade? Direct Trade? What does this all have to do with my cup of Joe and me? Come and see how coffee is grown, learn about how buying and roasting beans works, and taste why fresh roasted coffee can make a believer out of you. Speakers include coffee roaster Chad Close, Ragged Edge Roasting Company, and grower Emilio Garcia.

Three Cheers for A-B-C

Posted on: May 27th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

thankyouAPPLAUSE ALL AROUND
A huge “thank you” to all who contributed to our Arts Benefit Children (ABC) Online Fundraiser  May 20-22.  We did it together!  We didn’t even have to promise you Christmas wrapping paper or junk food – all we did was ask, and you answered. Thanks to your thoughtful generosity, we collected $2,763 in 48-hours to be used for camp and class scholarships.  A majority of our donations were received in $10 and $20 increments, proving that our small actions do indeed carry great impact.  If you missed out on this particular online event, you can always make an online donation to the Adams County Arts Council and share our sponsorship page with your friends.  No amount is too small.

MORE GOOD NEWS
Prior to the ABC fundraiser, ACAC staff also reached out to Adams/Hanover social clubs for scholarship assistance; an effort that resulted in $3,470.  Thanks to both of these efforts, the summer will be brighter for many children.

Ella - Eric Carle Collage CampCHECK OUT OUR CAMPS!
Summer is right around the corner, and ACAC’s camp schedule promises something for everyone.  From preschoolers to teens, the variety of offerings include pottery, sculpture, painting, music, drama, dance, cooking, photography, sewing, weaving, comic book art, collage, mixed media and more. If you haven’t checked out the summer camp offerings yet, click here.  Click on the camp of your choice to register online today! Camps are filling up fast.

Do you need financial assistance?
Fill out this simple form (click here for Spanish) to determine whether you qualify for a scholarship.  Children who qualify for the school lunch program are eligible for scholarships.

The Adams County Arts Education Center is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with friendly staff available to answer your questions, and art on the walls for you to explore.  If you have questions, would like to become a member, or would like more information about summer camps, call (717) 334-5006 or stop in for a visit.

Angela’s Story

Posted on: May 20th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

“The arts council staff took me in as if I was a member of their family.”

Making Friends: Ballerinas & Bears Summer Camp, ACAC, Summer 2013

Making Friends: Ballerinas & Bears Summer Camp, ACAC, Summer 2013

Angela, a single mom in Gettysburg, was walking by the arts council with her young daughters last year when something pulled them inside to explore.

“We saw their list of summer camps right away and I signed them up. I was so excited for them to have this experience and not just rely on me to be their teacher all summer.”

A student at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, Angela’s husband had recently left her, and without support, she was concerned that the girls might not be able to follow through and attend their camps—Ballerinas and Bears for both 5-year old Ella and 3-year old Callie, and Eric Carle Style Collages for Ella.

When she expressed concern to arts council staff, her fears were dispelled right away. “They immediately offered scholarship forms and even helped me fill them out. They took me in as if I was a member of their family,” Angela explains.

As it turns out, Angela was able to pay for the girls’ camps, so she turned down the scholarship offer so that other children might benefit. “But the fact that the scholarship fund was there, was so helpful. I was caught in a situation where the money wasn’t there at first, yet I felt strongly that my daughters have these experiences.”

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Callie enjoyed “Ballerinas and Bears” in the ACAC’s studio space

Ballerinas and Bears was a “hit” with both girls, according to Angela. “The teacher was wonderfully open and willing to let them have fun. They both got very enthusiastic about dance!”

Additionally, Angela thinks of Ella’s experiences as very nurturing. “I saw that she was starting to define herself as an artist—it is her calling. So the idea of art camp just thrilled her. I’ve been artistic my entire life too, and I want to support that (interest in Ella).”

Angela even used Ella’s artwork to create a project of her own—a calendar for her parents. “It was much more advanced artwork than a 5-year-old is usually allowed to do in school.”

“The entire experience was just terrific for both girls.”

Ella proudly shows some of her Eric Carle-inspired creations

Ella proudly shows some of her Eric Carle-inspired creations

Check out the 2014 Summer Camp Schedule by clicking here!

A summer camp in visual or culinary arts, music, theater, dance, and more is the perfect way to ensure your child continues growing, learning and having fun this summer!

Click here for the youth scholarship form (available in English in Spanish)–look under the Children’s Summer Camps section.

Click here to help make camps and classes accessible to all of the children in our community.

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TODAY’S THE DAY!

Posted on: May 20th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

 

I am a believer that all of our choices – big and small – have an impact beyond our wildest imaginings.  A kind word you share today can change the tenor of a stranger’s day; holding a door open for someone can restore his faith in humanity, even if only for a moment. Grocery shopping at 9 a.m. instead of 10 a.m. can be the difference between bumping into an old friend or getting the last of the fresh strawberries. Each tiny decision (and there are thousands of them we make each day) has the potential for a ripple effect into the future.

When I was in high school, my dad took me on a road trip to tour colleges.  I was pretty sure I wanted to go to the University of Maryland at College Park – it was my dad’s alma mater, and the charm of the “south” with its beautiful campuses appealed to me (I am from NJ, so Maryland is “south”).  From College Park, we headed further south to check out the University of Richmond and the University of Virginia.  Our plan was to head home from Charlottesville, but when we found ourselves on a two-lane highway in the lovely rolling hills of Virginia, we realized we had missed an exit or made a wrong turn somewhere. Looking at the map, taking I-81 home made more sense than trying to work our way back to the I-95 corridor, so we re-routed our trip.  When we started seeing signs for James Madison University, we detoured to stretch our legs and check it out. I had never heard of JMU, and was pleasantly surprised to stumble upon the beautiful campus and talk to some folks in the theatre department.  We picked up an application on a whim and continued home.

I applied to three of the four schools we visited that weekend, including JMU, but I was still fairly set on going to College Park. However, when the acceptance letter came from JMU, my trajectory changed in a split second. I am not sure why.  Maybe the pretty bluestone buildings appealed to my aesthetic sensibilities.  Maybe it was the appeal of a theatre department that boasted several student-produced productions each year.  Whatever it was, I decided to go to JMU instead of U of MD.  My life changed because my dad and I turned left when we were supposed to turn right. (Side note: I met my husband at JMU. There are also two children who exist in the world because my dad and I got lost.)

We aren’t always conscious of the impact small choices make in our lives or the lives of others, but there are times when we have an opportunity to make those choices knowingly.

Today is a day like that.

Today, you have an opportunity to click a few buttons and change lives.  Today you can share this post with your friends and family and donate a small amount towards an art-scholarship for a child.  The children who receive these scholarships would not otherwise be able to participate in the summer camps and classes offered by the Adams County Arts Council.

Where would that dollar, or five dollars, or ten dollars burning a hole in your pocket go if you didn’t send it to ACAC?  Maybe it would go toward an extra cup of coffee late in the afternoon, which would in turn, keep you up at night and make you grumpy tomorrow and more likely to yell at your kids.  Maybe it would go towards a pack of gum that somehow ends up chewed and stuck to the rug in your car.

OR…

You can send it the Adams County Arts Council, and know that your pocket change can make our community better by strengthening and enriching its youngest citizens.  Your few dollars and clicks could be the turning point that determines where a child in our community decides to go to college later.  It could be the miniscule thing that makes it possible for the next Ansel Adams or Georgia O’Keefe to discover his or her talent.  At the very least it could be the opportunity for two siblings to find something in common that they like to do together, building family connections.  Your pocket change has infinite possibility today.

How can you get involved?  It’s as easy as A-B-C:

A.  Click here: http://adamsarts.org/sponsorship
Donate $10.  Don’t have $10 to spare?  Donate $5. Or $1.  Every dollar counts – a click and a dollar or two makes a difference with unlimited potential.

B.  Share this story with your friends on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest or by email, and encourage them to play along and donate, too.

C.  Watch our progress on the blog and social media over the next 48 hours as we strive to meet our goal of $4,800 in 48 hours.  We’re hoping to reach 480 people who will donate $10 each.

“Sometimes the little opportunities that fly at us each day can have the biggest impact.” –Danny Wallace


 

 

Meet Mira and Avery

Posted on: May 16th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Regardless of whether one child is the next Van Gogh or whether she just likes to draw stick people, offering children artistic opportunities serves two purposes:

  1. A child is given the opportunity to find a medium for self-expression.
  2. A child is exposed to creative ways people can connect with each other.

The result is people who practice the arts, and people who appreciate them.

Mira's birdhouse from "Dirty Hands Pottery," summer 2013

Mira’s birdhouse from “Dirty Hands Pottery,” summer 2013

Mira is seven, and she loves art.  She is also very good at it.  Last year, thanks to a scholarship awarded through the Adams County Arts Council, she and her brother Avery participated in Jack Handshaw’s “Dirty Hands Pottery” camp and Sara Little’s “Magic Art Time Machine” camp.  Their mother Heidi expressed her gratitude, as she would not have been able to send both kids to camp without the scholarship, which provided a unique opportunity for the siblings to participate in an activity together.  Upon completion of the “Magic Art Time Machine” camp, Sara Little, having seen something promising in Mira’s work, offered Mira private lessons. Mira also won a coloring contest at school and an award for a painted Christmas ornament through the Hanover Area Arts Guild.  Keeping budding artists like Mira involved in art is important.

Avery learns about Edvard Monk's "The Scream" in Sara Little's camp, summer 2013

Avery learns about Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” in Sara Little’s “Magic Art Time Machine” camp, summer 2013

Avery is pretty good at art, too, but more importantly, he loved camp. Heidi confides that Avery usually wouldn’t choose art as “his thing,” but the camps provided exposure to activities he had never tried before, and he enthusiastically produced some impressive work.  He learned about artists like Edvard Munch and his famous painting, “The Scream;” he made a birdhouse; he and his sister shared their versions of the same subjects, a flower and the tree of life – each reflecting a unique interpretation.  Keeping art-enthusiasts like Avery excited about art is also important.

Avery's flower

Avery’s flower

As human beings, we accomplish nothing without creativity.  Whether is it picking out something to wear in the morning, or assessing the quality of your morning coffee by the perfect tint, determined by just the right amount of creamer; whether it is how you will approach a difficult conversation, or how you will let a loved one know you are thinking of her on her birthday; whether it is what you will cook for dinner, or the restaurant you choose if you don’t want to cook – every decision requires a creative impulse.  Our ability to make decisions beneficial to ourselves and to the people around us is largely dependent on our experiences.  Offering a variety of creative experiences to young people promises a future generation with tools to build a rich quality of life.

Mira's flower

Mira’s flower

Beginning May 20 through the 22nd, you will have the opportunity to help children in our community experience not only a rich summer, but also plant the seeds for future creative impulses.

What is your creative impulse telling you to do right now?  I bet it’s telling you to share this post with your friends – go ahead and swirl your mouse with a flourish to the “share” button.  Mark your calendar for our online event May 20-22 (will you draw a star or a heart on the calendar square?).  We are hoping to raise $4,800 in 48 hours for kids like Mira and Avery.  We hope you’ll join the celebration.

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The A, B, C’s of Arts Education

Posted on: May 14th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

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School is almost out, but here at the Arts Council we are gearing up for a new kind of “A,B, C’s.”

The Arts Benefit Children (ABC) is an online fundraising event, set for May 20-22, to raise critical funds for summer camp and class scholarships–to benefit disadvantaged youth.

Why is arts education so important?

Consider these facts from the non-profit organization Americans for the Arts:

  • Arts education “makes a tremendous impact on the developmental growth of every child and has been proven to help level the “learning field” across socio-economic boundaries.”
  • Arts education strengthens student problem-solving and critical thinking skills, adding to overall academic achievement and school success.
  • And arts education can help troubled youth, providing an alternative to destructive behavior and another way for students to approach learning.

Young people who participate in the arts for at least three hours on three days each week through at least one full year are:

  • 4 times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement
  • 3 times more likely to be elected to class office within their schools
  • 4 times more likely to participate in a math and science fair

Young artists, as compared with their peers, are likely to:

  • Read for pleasure nearly twice as often
  • Perform community service more than four times as often

How can you contribute to arts education for the youth of Adams County? It’s as easy as A-B-C:

A. Starting at 8 a.m. on May 20, visit http://adamsarts.org/sponsorship and make your donation.  If just 480 people donate $10 each, we will meet our goal.  Every dollar counts!

B. Share and tweet this information with your friends on all of your social networks.  We will be sharing blog posts and stories leading up to the event, so there will be many opportunities to help us spread the word and invite your friends to participate.

C. Be sure to watch our progress online!  We will update ACAC’s sponsorship page and social media outlets regularly throughout the 48-hour period to let you know how we’re doing.  The event begins at 8 AM on May 20, and ends at 8 AM on May 22.  Don’t miss out on this amazing and fun opportunity to help a child access the arts.

July 12: SAVE THE DATE!

Posted on: May 13th, 2014 by Charlotte Scheper

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The 3rd annual CenturyLink Gettysburg ChiliBrew & BBQ2 returns!

WHEN?  Saturday July 12, 12-6pm

WHERE?  Gateway Gettysburg, 95 Presidential Circle, Gettysburg, PA, Routes 15 & 30

Brews! Music! Entertainment! Games! Food!

After our long winter, do you long to be outside in the warm weather, eating good food with good people? If so, make sure to mark the Gettysburg ChiliBrew & BBQ2 on your calendar!

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BBQ is an American summertime staple. But for a lot of folks, BBQ is a serious business. The CenturyLink Gettysburg ChiliBrew & BBQs will be sanctioned by the Kansas City BBQ Society, hailing from a city where BBQ dates back to the 19th century. This delicious food can be prepared a variety of ways, creating a diverse selection of BBQ styles. Most importantly, it is cooked in abundance, allowing for large gatherings of friends, family, and hungry townsfolk!

But the July 12 event offers much more than BBQ: be sure to enjoy samples at designated times throughout the day of chili, wings, ribs, and BBQ from championship BBQ teams, restaurants, backyarders and fire companies. Listen to great music, play games, and immerse yourself in the summer atmosphere of this one-of-a-kind Gettysburg event!

Proceeds benefit the non-profit ACAC, whose mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. The ACAC has been benefitting the community since 1993, enriching the lives of thousands of students and adults. The ACAC offers 20 programs and 120 classes a year, ensuring that the arts remain active in the blossoming 21st century. This year, BBQ is powering our programs – the July 12 event is designed to be one of our biggest fundraisers of the year.

Tickets on sale May 1:
$7 in advance — $10 at gate
Available through Adams County Arts Council, 125 S Washington St, Gettysburg [717-334-5006]

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Hot Links:
Interested in becoming a vendor? Click here for the application
Fancy yourself a competitive barbecue backyarder? Click here to apply
Are you a KCBS registered team? Click here for details
Do you make a mean pot of firehouse chili? Area fire companies can click here to join the chili competition

Charlotte Scheper is a student at Gettysburg College and a spring 2014 intern at the Adams County Arts Council. A native of Baltimore, Maryland, Charlotte is an Arts & Media major, interested in creative visual arts such as graphic design, photography, and film. Her favorite things about BBQs are baby back ribs, corn on the cob, and being with friends!

Once upon a time…

Posted on: May 7th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Arts Benefit Children - An Online Event - May 20-22Once upon a time, there was a middle-aged woman.  Every Monday, she woke up, made coffee, woke her children, made breakfast, nagged at them to brush their teeth and put on their shoes, and then drove them to school to start their day.  She continued on to her workplace, where she usually spent the first ten to fifteen minutes of her day checking email and perusing Facebook; a comforting routine to ease herself from the role of mother to the role of employee, ready to tackle the tasks on her to-do list.

One day, as she sat at her computer, a beautiful, brightly colored-image danced across her Facebook newsfeed.  “Arts Benefit Children!” it said.  “Well, of course the arts benefit children,” she thought to herself, and so she clicked. Here is what she read:

Postcard-web“SAVE THE DATE!  On May 20-22, you will have an opportunity to help the Adams County Arts Council raise $4,800 in 48 hours!  We are harnessing the power of the internet to reach out to thousands of people, who can change the lives of children and make the world a better place with just the click of a button!”

“Hmmm…I’m a little skeptical,” she thought to herself.  But she read on.  It turned out that an old friend of hers was involved in the fundraiser, and had posted the colorful image.  She clicked the “donate” button, sent in ten dollars, and then shared the link on her Facebook page, in an attempt to reconnect with her friend.  Her donation surprisingly brought on the sense that she had already accomplished something helpful and important that day, and it was only 8:45 a.m.  “Huh,” she thought. “Simple mouse-clicks do have the capability of affecting people.  But why would anyone want to donate to an organization with which they may not have a personal connection?”

The answer came to her surprisingly quickly.  She suddenly remembered a painting class she took as a third grader.  She had just moved to a new city and school where she hadn’t yet made friends.  She was lonely and worried she would never adjust.  At the beginning of the class, she couldn’t think of anything to paint, so she decided she would just choose colors to paint “lonely.”  The result was a beautiful painting in blues and greens, and her teacher shared it with the rest of the class.  At the end of class, another student approached her and told her how much she liked the painting.  The girl was still her friend thirty years later.  Art had changed her life in that moment.

A man in another state, who knew the woman in college, saw the brightly colored image pop up in his newsfeed.  Seeing her name attached to the post unexpectedly flooded him with college memories. He recalled a meeting with his freshman advisor, who told him he was required to take an art class.  “I don’t want to take an art class,” he had thought at the time. “I’m a mathematician, not an artist.”  But his advisor explained that the art class was a requirement for graduation.  So he decided on an acting class.  He realized he had been using principles from the class every day in his classroom as a math teacher. Thanks to that acting class, he was comfortable in front of a crowd and better able to read the faces of his students.  Not to mention, he met his wife in that acting class.

He called his wife, and nostalgically recounted the memory of their meeting place, telling her about the post on Facebook.  “I am sharing it with you right now,” he said.  “You should share it with your artsy-friends and donate a dollar or two.”  She laughed, because she and her husband often playfully debated the differences in their educations; his was much more math and science-based, while she had been a music major with a minor in English.  They were both highly intelligent people, and both were teachers now, touching the lives of future generations with skills polished at least partially, if not entirely, by their experiences with art.

She shared the Facebook post, too, and donated five dollars.  As she read the stories across shared posts, she was deeply touched.  She had been the recipient of a music scholarship in the fourth grade that allowed her to take violin lessons.  Her family could not afford the instrument rental without that scholarship, and if she had not taken those lessons, she would never have tapped into the musical part of herself that filled her heart and life so significantly.  She realized the scholarship was the reason she taught elementary orchestra now.  She tweeted and emailed the fundraiser information to all of her colleagues.

This is how it works. 

Every day, we connect with people, and the common source of our human connection is creativity.   Whether it is telling a joke, watching a movie, writing a business memo, or writing a novel, the source of human connection requires a creative thought and a medium through which it can be expressed.

In the coming weeks, we will share real stories of kids who have benefitted from scholarships. You can be part of giving them the tools to creatively contribute to their relationships, careers and to the quality of life in our communities.

Do you have an art story?  Will you share it, along with this invitation to help others write theirs?

If just 480 people donate $10 each, we can offer scholarships to more than thirty disadvantaged young people.  We can unleash the creative potential in children who may not otherwise be able to tap into such a venue.

Don’t have $10 to spare?  Donate just $5.  Or $1.  Every dollar counts – a click and a dollar or two makes a difference with unlimited potential connections

How can you get involved?  It’s as easy as A-B-C:

A. Visit our donation page between May 20 and 22nd
http://adamsarts.org/sponsorship
Donate a dollar.  Or $5.  Or $10.  Or more, if you feel so inspired.  But know that every dollar counts.

B. Share this story with your friends, and encourage them to play along and donate, too.

C. Come back to the blog to hear stories about past scholarship recipients who have enjoyed classes and camps here, and track our progress.

We look forward to hearing from you soon!

lisaandkaren

 

 

 

Lisa Cadigan is a director on the Adams County Arts Council’s board and the chair of ACAC’s Marketing & Development Committee. She is also the sole proprietor of Cadigan Creative, where she offers graphic design and marketing services.  You can  find out more about Lisa on the Cadigan Creative website, and see samples of her writing on her blog, Daily Presents.

Karen Hendricks is a volunteer on the Adams County Arts Council’s marketing and development committee and the owner/president of Hendricks Communications, LLC.  Karen demonstrates a love of writing and communicating in all she does; it’s the common thread linking all of her current and past experiences.  Her communications firm provides compelling public relations and marketing services to a select but varied group of clients. You can find out more about Karen on the Hendricks Communications website and see additional samples of her writing on her blog, Off the Merry-Go-Round.

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