Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County, PA

Posts Tagged ‘drawing’

ABCs of the Arts: An Interview with Wendy Heiges

Posted on: April 11th, 2018 by Lisa Cadigan

by Elle Lamboy

Photo by Autumn Kern

Meet Wendy Heiges, Program and Gallery Director at the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC). Her dedication and passion not only for the arts but also for the students who benefit from arts programming are inspiring.

This week, we are raising funds for our Arts Benefit Children (ABC) scholarship fund. All proceeds from the ABC campaign help Wendy and other dedicated staff and volunteers continue to instill the gift of art in the Gettysburg community. Your contribution provides scholarships for children who may not otherwise be able to attend arts camps and classes.

We’re happy to share this interview with Wendy here.

Question: You started with ACAC first as a volunteer, then joined the executive board and became co-coordinator of classes held at the Imagination Station on Carlisle St., and then you moved to your current staff position when ACAC moved to the Arts Education Center seven years ago. What have been your fondest memories/greatest accomplishments?

Wendy: I’m grateful to have had a chance to work with and promote outstanding artist/instructors in our community and to contribute, as the Program & Gallery Director of the ACAC, to the growth and sustainability of the arts through public classes and gallery events over the past 10 years.

Question: Why should someone support the ACAC’s ABC campaign?

Wendy: Investing time and money through art enrichment programs for children allows them to keep a school mindset during summer downtime, as well as cultivate and enrich their mind, social skills, boost their math and science skills, and dream time. Studies show that there is a community need for after-school and summer camp programs which help children thrive. The ACAC’s summer camps provide hands-on art enrichment opportunities in an encouraging, small classroom environment with professional instruction.

Question: Why are the arts important to you?

Wendy: The arts help my sense of well-being flourish, give me purpose, and add beauty and value to my everyday life.

Question: What do the arts do to enhance a community?

Wendy: The arts transcend age, gender, socio-economic background, and experience. When a person picks up a paint brush, handles a mound of clay, sings a song, dances, or takes a picture, their world for that moment is magical, and the possibilities seem boundless. The arts contribute to a vibrant community by encouraging diversity and by giving anyone who would like to shine a chance and a place to do so.

Question: Why should someone take a class at the ACAC at any age?

Wendy: I believe the classes at the ACAC are developed to provide the opportunity for anyone who would like to learn a creative skill in a comfortable and welcoming environment to do so. Cultivating your inner artist makes whatever else you do better. You feel better, and when you feel better, you approach other tasks at hand with a new sense of joy and purpose. You don’t have to be a professional artist to reap the benefits of the arts. Take a class at the Arts Education Center and see where it takes you!

Donate now to the ABC Campaign! Your donation provides scholarships for children who may not otherwise be able to attend arts camps and classes.

Artist Spotlight: Sally Becker

Posted on: April 23rd, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

sally beckerWhile exploring the gully and stream behind her childhood home at the age of five, Sally Becker found clay. Over 50 years later, her Iron Blue Gully Studio sits above that very clay deposit. The iron-rich, bluish clay is a reminder of her first experiences with nature and art, inspiring her work, along with the memories, landscapes and history of her childhood home.

Sally’s mother was not a professional artist, but believed in the importance of art, and shared that belief with her children. Sally took art classes outside of school, and developed the philosophy that art is good for everyone from an early age. Later, she took many courses in clay, as well as drawing, painting and photography, while working toward her BFA at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She went on for a Masters in Education from Penn State, which she credits with improving her effectiveness as a teacher. An elementary and high school art teacher for 40 years, Sally describes herself as the jack of many trades, working in a variety of media.

Sally retired from teaching two years ago, which has opened up opportunities to work in her studio. Ten years ago, she began exploring Encaustic painting, a medium of hot wax and pigment, which originated in ancient Rome. She was able to study this medium with Michael Campbell at Shippensburg University.

Sarah_M_Becker_Memory_Bank_Barn_frontThere’s a lot of clay in her studio, too, but she often mixes media: clay sculptures often have images carved into them, or she will draw with colored slips. She also enjoys drawing with pastels, ink, pencil and graphite. “When I retired, I thought I would start this studio for the fun of it,” Sally says. “But I’m beginning to think there’s more. I am continually drawn to what’s around me where I grew up, landscapes, memories, animals, historical aspects of the farm. I want my family to see these things and remember from my point of view. I want to find a way to get people to think; to make them stop and look.”

fish plateIt makes sense that this urge to inspire people to notice the beauty around them is still with her after 40 years of teaching. Fortunately for our community, Sally continues to share her inspiration and skill teaching classes at the Adams County Arts Council. This session, she is teaching Beginning Drawing and Introduction to Soft Pastels. This summer, she will offer two camps: Turn Songs into Paintings, for ages 8-10 from June 8-12, and 3D Architectural and Figurative Sculpture, for ages 11-14 from June 22-26. Her work can also be seen at numerous ACAC Exhibits and Instructors’ Shows throughout the year… including clay pieces inspired by a 5-year old’s delightful discovery.

 

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