Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County, PA

Posts Tagged ‘Gettysburg’

Introducing Donna Harrison: Principal at James Gettys Elementary

Posted on: April 25th, 2017 by Lisa Cadigan

By Lisa Cadigan

I had the pleasure of interviewing Donna Harrison, principal at James Gettys Elementary School in Gettysburg, and I asked her how she thinks studying the arts in school enhances learning.

She had a twinkle in her eye and a warm smile as she recounted tales of children who are able to “shine” when given an opportunity to express themselves creatively, particularly in the annual Fine Arts Night at James Gettys Elementary, which showcases student performances of songs and dance choreography learned in music and physical education classes. She noted similar observations in the music program for older students, “I see kids in orchestra who may struggle academically, but who thrive on an instrument.” Students involved in music and the arts are able to set and meet goals through the practice of creative expression in ways that translate to success in other areas as well.

Artist-in-residence Ellen Ehlenbeck worked with students to create a permanent autobiographical mobile installation in the lobby of James Gettys.

Mrs. Harrison shared stories of artists-in-residence who have spent time at James Gettys, like Ellen Ehlenbeck, whose program last year resulted in an installation of student-produced “self-portrait” mobiles that adorn the school’s lobby, and the National Circus Project (http://www.nationalcircusproject.com/) that visits every other year, teaching students to master a brand new performance skill over the course of just one week. The students love these opportunities, and look forward to them each year.

Art projects in each classroom help students to absorb concepts and express themselves.

But it’s not just visiting artists who are bursting with creativity in the halls of James Gettys. Mrs. Harrison commended an imaginative staff who often incorporate the arts into classroom teaching. The Action Based Learning (ABL) program uses a multi-sensory approach to help kindergartners learn letters and their sounds with whole-body movement. Art projects directly related to science, social studies and reading ensure that new concepts and ideas are being fully absorbed. Many teachers use songs regularly in class to instill good habits with lining up, washing hands, math facts, etc. Mrs. Harrison shared a story of one student who passed his test on the preamble of the Constitution by singing it—it was the only way he could remember all of the words.

Mrs. Harrison’s anecdotal observations are supported by multiple research studies, including the ideas presented in the article cited in our earlier ABC campaign blog post (http://adamsarts.org/support-the-arts-for-our-sake-its-as-easy-as-abc/) referencing Dr. Lois Hetland, professor and graduate coordinator in the art education department at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and senior research affiliate at Project Zero in the Harvard Graduate School of Education. In that interview, while Dr. Hetland says using art as a “vehicle to teach other academic content” is often “appropriate and useful,” she also warns that this should not be seen as a substitute for arts instruction, which places a unique emphasis on the “Eight Studio Habits of Mind.” Her research on this topic suggests that art instruction impacts students’ abilities to think meta-cognitively, even at early ages. This further reinforces the idea that arts education is key in helping to develop not just a student, but a human being. Dr. Hetland says, “The real product of art education is not the works of art, but the child.” The eight steps include these tangible skills:

  • Developing Craft
  • Engage And Persist
  • Envision
  • Express
  • Observe
  • Reflect
  • Stretch And Explore
  • Understand Art World

My conversation with Mrs. Harrison supported these ideas. We discussed the importance of creative expression and instruction in an academic setting, and how it allows students to set goals and reach their own great expectations in ways that may not always be possible in other areas. “We can’t just focus on test scores. We need to keep the whole child in mind,” says Mrs. Harrison.

You can help a child develop important skills like practicing a craft, engaging and persisting, expression, observation and reflection by making a donation to our ABC campaign. Every three $50 donations sends one child to a summer arts camp.

Thank you for your support!

Donate now!

 

References

“A Look at Lois Hetland’s Eight Studio Habits.” Every Art, Every Child | Studio Habits. Northeastern Illinois University, 2012. Web. 24 Apr. 2017. <http://www.everyarteverychild.org/assessment/studiohabits.html>.

Cadigan, Lisa C. “Support the Arts for OUR Sake: It’s as Easy as ABC.” Adams County Arts Council. Adams County Arts Council, 22 Apr. 2017. Web. 24 Apr. 2017. <http://adamsarts.org/support-the-arts-for-our-sake-its-as-easy-as-abc/>.

Heller, Rafael. “On the Goals and Outcomes of Arts Education: An Interview with Lois Hetland.” Phi Beta Kappan 98.7 (2017): 15-20. Web. 21 Apr. 2017.

 

December Days at the ACAC: Christmas Creativity, Comfort Foods

Posted on: November 26th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks

100mediaimag3647_1It’s as simple as 1, 2, 3: Kick off the month of December with three opportunities to enjoy fun classes at the ACAC with an eye towards holiday gift-giving:

First, on December 1, round up your girlfriends and enjoy a fun evening before the “holiday crazies” hit. Deck the halls with your artwork for the holiday season! Or, give your artwork to a special friend or family member—what a treasured, one-of-a-kind gift you’ll be giving! The wintry snowman, at right, is the scene you’ll be creating.

Paint and Wine Night, Thursday, December 1, 6-8:30 p.m.
Grab a friend, or come and make some new friends and enjoy an evening of artistic creativity, wine and amusement. We’ll provide the supplies and step by step instruction to complete a piece of art- no experience necessary! Marie Smith, $36  Register

Next, on December 2, prep for the long winter days ahead by learning how to take care of your family with healthy comfort foods. You’ll enjoy a fun cooking class to boot!

Fall Harvest Cooking 3, Friday, December 2, 6-8 p.m.
Let’s hear it for the roots! Potatoes, beets, and onions take center stage as you learn how to season and pair these late harvest delights with comfort foods that are healthy.
Suborn Sijipati  Register

Healthy Harvest: root vegetables

Healthy Harvest: root vegetables

And on December 3, make unique fused glass ornaments to trim your own tree or to give away as Christmas or Chanukah gifts. Hand-crafted, homemade gifts are some of the most special and treasured gifts. Plus you’ll have fun seeing your creations come together, as you learn how to fuse glass!

Fused Glass Holiday Ornaments: Saturday, December 3, 10-12:30 pm 
Learn glass fusing techniques as you make several beautiful Christmas/Chanukah-themed glass ornaments. You work at your own pace, making this is a great class for both beginners and intermediates.   Leah Powell
 $45.00 ($42)  Register

Sparkling creations: fused glass ornaments

Sparkling creations: fused glass ornaments

Share a love of the arts with your friends & family this holiday season. Does your Christmas shopping list contain any of the following people?

  • Someone who already has everything he/she needs?
  • Someone you’d like to spend time with, do something special with?
  • Someone who is hard to buy for?
  • Area children who enjoy being creative?
  • Someone in need of a treat, a night out, a fun experience?

ACAC gift certificates are the perfect solution! They are redeemable for any future classes at the ACAC including cooking classes, arts & crafts workshops, dance/yoga classes, fine arts classes such as painting or drawing instruction, pottery classes resulting in beautiful creations… and the list goes on and on.

Gift certificates can be purchased during regular business hours:

  • Monday – Friday: 9 am – 5 pm
  • Saturday: 10 am – 2 pm

Wishing you a holiday season filled with creativity and the arts!

Girls’ Night Out: Cutout Canvas Wall Art

Posted on: October 19th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks
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Lori Nelson’s cut canvas wall art: Make you own during Friday Friday, Nov. 4!

There’s a twist to the ACAC’s next “First Friday” event: Attendees will not only be able to enjoy a great night on the town with gallery exhibits and refreshments, but they will also be able to create a stunning piece of artwork at the ACAC.

“Girls’Night Out: Cutout Canvas Wall Art” is a new class debuting on First Friday, November 4, 6-8 pm. Girlfriends are encouraged to round up a friend or two, put in their RSVPs now, and with the help of instructor Lori Nelson, and no experience needed, have a fun evening creating a gorgeous piece of artwork.

“The idea for this class actually originated with my own daughter going to college and wanting artwork for her walls,” Nelson explains. “I love working with an Exacto knife, cutting out designs.”

lori-nelson-cut-canvas-series

Lori Nelson’s cut canvas series, created for her daughter

“Cutout canvas wall art is something fairly simple, and I think everyone who attends will come away with a piece of artwork they can be proud of. I have a very practical approach to art—I like seeing people being able to use their art, to hang it up, and enjoy it.”

“Not to put down ‘paint nights’ at all, but that takes a certain set of skills, and not everyone goes home with a piece of artwork they’re proud of hang on their walls—a lot of times people enjoy the process of creating the art more than the end result,” Nelson explains.

All proceeds from the First Friday class benefit the Arts Council.

Nelson, a longtime ACAC instructor (she’s one of the original instructors going back to the ACAC’s former location on Carlisle Street, when classes were first offered through the ACAC), says she enjoys sharing her love of the arts with both adults and children. Although pottery is her main focus, Nelson says she enjoys switching gears and putting her fine arts degree to work by dabbling in other art forms.

Most days, she works in her home-based pottery studio. Two days a week, she works for Fitzgerald Pottery. The Dillsburg-based business mentored her start with pottery, and she has enjoyed working for them for the past 30 years.

“Even though I’m an artist by trade, I’ve always had a passion for teaching art so that people can enjoy it and appreciate it better,” she says.

 

Click here to register for Girls’ Night Out: Cutout Canvas Wall Art. Cost is $30 for ACAC members; $33 for non-members.

Explore Lori Nelson’s Pottery online

And click here to visit Fitzgerald Pottery

It’s HERE! Arts Benefit Children (ABC) 50/50
April 26-28

Posted on: April 25th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

In preparation for our exciting online event, ABC 50/50, we have spent the past few weeks introducing you to prominent members of our community who have one thing in common: they all recognize the importance of creative thinking and aesthetic expression in connecting us to each other in community, which consequently maximizes our quality of life as human beings.

Ed W Clark GETT - March 2014

Ed Clark

In our first article, you met Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site, who explains the importance of using the artistic and aesthetic aspects of our town to teach its rich history to generation after generation. An understanding of history informs our treatment of others, our politics and our plans for the future both as a local community and as a united world. The artistic monuments, books, paintings, plays, and museums are just a few examples of how that history has been shared in Gettysburg with people from all over the world.

Marty Qually

Marty Qually

Next we introduced you to Adams County Commissioner Marty Qually, who creatively thinks of our county as “a canvas, and there are 100,000 people with paintbrushes.” He says, “My job is to help all of them paint this county into something better than it was.” Commissioner Qually reminds us that to do a good job at whatever your career may be, one should find a creative “niche” from which to do it.

Marc-thumb

Marc Jalbert

We introduced you to baker and entrepreneur Marc Jalbert, a successful business owner in the Gettysburg area for over 20 years, who began his career with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in painting from the University of Southern Maine. Jalbert’s arts education still informs decisions he makes with his business every day, and we as a community reap the benefits when we visit his beautiful bakery and sample the artisan breads and pastries he offers in service.

PresidentRiggs2015_thumb

Janet Riggs

In a political climate where liberal arts degrees are often discounted, Gettysburg College President Janet Riggs recently offered her thoughts in an editorial in the Miami Herald: “Politicians are doing a disservice to us all by blasting the liberal arts. Residential liberal arts colleges prepare students not only for professional success, but also for lives of civic impact. Our world needs more people — not fewer — with this kind of preparation.” She goes on to emphasize that an education that focuses on creative thinking in a variety of disciplines produces citizens who “go on to have rich and diverse careers in human services, marketing, business, research, human resources, consulting, and education,” noting that her own liberal arts education and major in psychology eventually landed her a position as the president of a prestigious college.

I wish we could profile 100 more people in this series – We are so blessed to live among a diversely creative group of people in this community, each of whom makes a lasting contribution to the tapestry of our lives. I know I am not alone in my desire to continue improving upon our quality of life while preparing the next generation of creative thinkers and community leaders. We all have an opportunity right now to help make that happen.

Join us April 26 through the 28th and make your donation to the ABC 50/50 campaign.

Why “50/50”?

We are asking for $50 donations over a 50-hour period, from Tuesday April 26 at 8 a.m. through Thursday, April 28 at 8 a.m. It takes three $50 donations to send a child to a summer arts camp. Will you help us send kids to camp and classes this year?

Can’t spare $50? We will be so grateful if you can make a $50 donation (or more) toward this campaign; however, if $50 seems too steep, every $0.50 counts, too. Remember the success of our 2014 campaign? We were able to send 20 kids to camp with your $1 to $10 donations. It all counts, so make your donation today!

How can I help?
It’s as easy as A-B-C:

ABC-LOGO-webA. Visit adamsarts.org/sponsorship on April 26 and make your online donation.

B. Share, email and tweet this information to all of your contacts on social media. Your sharing is essential to the success of this campaign.

C. Be sure to watch (and share) our progress online! How many $50 donations can we receive in 50 hours? We will keep you posted on the sponsorship page and on Facebook and Twitter throughout the event.

This event was made possible by the volunteer efforts of the Adams County Arts Council’s Marketing and Development Committee:
Lisa Cadigan, Chair
Anne Cherry
Carol Cook
Joyce Ettenger
Chris Glatfelter (executive director, ACAC)
Nanette Hatzes
Wendy Heiges
Karen Hendricks
Elle Lamboy
Polly Patrono-Carlson

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Marc Jalbert on How to Be an Entrepreneur:
Major in Art

Posted on: April 22nd, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series leads to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28. Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Marc

Marc Jalbert

Today’s article is features Marc Jalbert, entrepreneur baker and owner of the Gettysburg Baking Company, which is nestled in the corner of Lincoln Square in Gettysburg.

Adams County residents as well as visitors from near and far are familiar with the Gettysburg Baking Company, its baker/owner Marc Jalbert, and the beautiful and delicious artisan breads and pastries the bakery offers. (If you’re not – go visit and buy a seeded twist!) Jalbert has been a successful small-business owner in Adams County for twenty years. During that time, various incarnations of his bakery/café have seen success thanks to high quality products, impeccable customer service, and beautifully designed, well-managed spaces.

How did Marc Jalbert come to be such a successful entrepreneur and fixture in the Gettysburg restaurant scene? Was he a business major? Did he study hotel and restaurant management as an undergraduate? These are answers one may expect from a successful restaurateur, but Jalbert actually began his career with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Southern Maine.

Marc_seededtwist

Marc’s famous seeded twists

After teaching art briefly at a private school following graduation, Jalbert realized he “wanted to do his own thing,” so he started freelancing as a graphic designer. Sitting behind a desk all day soon grew tiresome, so he followed his curiosity to learn how to bake – a job that allowed him to be up and about while working with his hands to create an aesthetic and delicious product. “I naively thought baking would be easier than cooking,” Jalbert confesses. But he also feels that his naiveté kept him in the game to keep learning. He took a few classes at King Arthur Flour in Norwich, Vermont after working as a self-taught baker for about six years, and moved to Gettysburg in 1995 with the intentions of establishing a bakery business and storefront.

How did his fine arts degree prepare him for running a business? “Every challenge that comes up can be thought of as a design problem,” says Jalbert. “Whether it’s marketing and designing logos and communications materials, setting up a space that is an efficient and user-friendly place to work and visit, or managing a staff, an artist is trained to look at the whole as well as its parts and how they fit together.” Jalbert had the additional benefit of being raised in an entrepreneurial environment – his dad owned a barbershop in Maine. An avid reader, he continues to read and learn as new challenges arise, but he says he uses his fine arts major every day.

Marc_bakery“Artists are trained to be mindful and pay attention,” says Jalbert. “As an art student, you are trained to stop and look at things – it’s a more open-ended means of problem solving, which may be more suited to ‘jobs of the future.’ Who ever heard of a webmaster 20 years ago?” Rather than education that strictly trains for a task, Jalbert suggests we consider focusing more on education for creative thinking as jobs that didn’t even exist in the not-so-distant past continue to evolve in our society.

If you visit his shop and pay attention, it’s easy to notice the details of the artist in the space, from the warm and welcoming color scheme, to the use of space; from the accessories carefully chosen to display his wares, to the beautiful details in the shape, texture and color of each loaf and pastry. And don’t forget the taste. Everything is delicious.

Marc_stickybunsAs we kick off our Arts Benefit Children (ABC) 50/50 event on April 26 to raise scholarship funds for children to attend arts camps and classes at the ACAC, remember fellow community members like Marc, whose business contributes so much to the quality of life in Adams County. It is largely thanks to art education that Jalbert is able to contribute so much to our community as a small business owner and entrepreneur. Help us continue to foster new generations of creative thinkers and doers by participating in ABC 50/50. Stay tuned for more news on this exciting event.

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Summer Flashback!

Posted on: April 20th, 2016 by Karen Hendricks

Photos by Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator

summer flashback 1

Chefs in the kitchen, Putting It All Together! Summer 2015

April… a transitional month that combines gorgeous sunshine-filled days as well as rain-splashed days, as we take a step closer to summer.

And summer is one of the busiest and happiest times of year at the Arts Education Center thanks to the fun lineup of Summer Arts Camps that enrich the lives of hundreds of area children!

As we gear up for another fabulous summer season, we want to let the community know how much these camps impact children’s (and families’) lives. In just a few days, from April 26-28, we are launching an online event, Arts Benefit Children (ABC): 50/50 to raise money for scholarships that help many area children attend summer arts camps.

Meantime, if you are a parent or grandparent interested in enrolling your children/grandchildren in summer arts camps, feel free to take advantage of a special offer available through May 2, 2016: Buy 2 camps, get the 3rd at ½ off! (Click here for the online schedule.)

Enjoy taking a look back at photos and testimonials from last year’s 2015 Summer Arts Camps season:

summer flashback 2

Beautiful sounds & syncopated rhythms are coming from the Gallery thanks to ACAC Youth Choir Camp, Brent Talbot, Director, Matt Carlson, Assistant Director.

 

summer flashback 3

Mask Making campers are learning how to create zentangles! Stanley Gilmore Instructor.

 

summer flashback 4

The Art of Mask Making!!! Masks are on their way to completion!! Stanley Gilmore, Instructor

 

summer flashback 5

Get Your Dance Groove On campers are striking a pose! Hope Lawrence Instructor

Testimonials, summer 2015:

How was the class registration process? Easy, painless (consistent answer from the majority of families)

What summer projects were favorites?

  • All of them! (consistent answer from many families

The Preschool Ballerina and Bears campers liked:

  • The gummy bear dance
  • Dancing with boys
  • The end of week dance for family
  • Dancing with new friends
  • Savannah enjoyed the dance steps she learned and has been dancing around the house
summer flashback 6

Chef Chris Rinehart has prepared a fantastic menu for the Chef Camp for Foodies campers!

 

summer flashback 7

Wow!! Look what our Sewing is Fun campers made!

 

summer flashback 8

Ballerinas & Bears campers are performing for their family & friends for their end of camp week party!

More summer 2015 testimonials:

Can you share any specific comments about the camp your child shared with you?

  • They liked everything
  • Loved coming every day
  • Wished it was longer
  • He learned a lot
  • She was very excited to come everyday and wrote “I had fun with this ‘extrodanary’ teacher!”

What did your child like most about art class?

  • Everything!
  • Creating his own unique mask
  • Learning new recipes and mixing things

100% agreed–Yes, they would recommend the art classes to others!

Summer Arts Camps received an average 4.85 out of 5 rating!

summer flashback 9

Sewing IS fun!!! Linda Fauth, Instructor.

 

summer flashback 10

Castles Castles Castles campers are creating some incredible castles.

 

summer flashback 11

Mr. Jack has prepared a table for 13….potters that is! Dirty Hands Pottery camp… dig in!

 

summer flashback 12

Linda Fauth, Cooks in the Kitchen Instructor, is preparing for today’s menu which will include peach cobbler, personalized pizzas and red bean quesadillas. Yum!

 

summer flashback 13

Fun With Weaving Camp, Joh Ricci Instructor

 

summer flashback 14

Build a House camper with Instructor Erica Woodworth.

 

summer flashback 15

Happy ACAC Guitar Camp students

We hope you join us online, to transform and enrich the lives of area children, April 26-27, for ABC: 50/50 (Arts Benefit Children). This is the 3rd annual ABC event, which has proven to be a successful event with great community support for which we (and many area families) are extremely thankful. It has also proven to be an essential event, supporting scholarships that have allowed dozens of area children to attend summer arts camps as well as arts classes throughout the year. Stay tuned for more details on the upcoming 2016 event!

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NYE: Gettysburg Style

Posted on: December 28th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

12363048_10153359222182449_6479196797616507991_o“Spirits are high and everyone is hopeful”

This is an excerpt from an article published in Celebrate Gettysburg magazine, Nov/Dec 2015:

The grand finale to Gettysburg’s holiday season attracts about 2,000 people to Lincoln Square on New Year’s Eve. Organizer Chris Glatfelter, Executive Director of the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC), says the key to Gettysburg’s New Year’s Eve Celebration is its universal appeal to people of all ages and the community partnerships it produces. Gettysburg Borough, ACNB Bank, and the Majestic Theatre are just some of the collaborators.

The ACAC is mainly responsible for entertainment, including a DJ on the square starting at 9 pm, followed by a live music stage from 9:30-11:30, free arts activities at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center, a free family movie at the Majestic, performances and entertainment at Christ Lutheran Church, then a countdown to midnight program led by Major William Troxell at 11:30, culminating in fireworks lighting the midnight sky above Lincoln Square, sponsored by ACNB Bank.

“The ACAC is involved because of the arts… When you can add an arts element to a program or event, you make it better,” Glatfelter explains. “The music adds to the downtown atmosphere, a balloon artist fascinates the kids… It’s important for us to be in the public eye stressing the value of the arts.”

“The thing with New Year’s Eve that always strikes me,” Glatfelter continues, “I’ve seen close to 2,000 people of all ages, enjoying themselves, dancing, shivering together… but spirits are high and everyone is hopeful for a new year and what will come.”

Click here for a full listing of NYE events

Click here for the full Celebrate Gettysburg magazine article, The Heart of the Holidays

The Heart of the Holidays

 

6th Annual Gingerbread Celebration & Holiday Mart—Something for Everyone!

Posted on: December 2nd, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

by Elle Lamboy

2011 Gingerbread Winner IMG_5041

Nothing says “holiday” like gingerbread, shopping, Santa Claus, ugly sweaters and a little friendly competition!

The Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) is excited to present the 6th Annual Gingerbread Celebration & Holiday Mart on December 4-December 5. Chris Glatfelter, ACAC Executive Director states, “We’re pleased to invite the community, free of charge, to enjoy the houses, Holiday Mart and all the other activities we’re offering. It’s a great way to welcome in the holiday season and to support arts education in the county.”

The event takes place at HACC’s Gettysburg Campus, located at 731 Old Harrisburg Road, and runs Friday from Noon to 7:00 p.m. and Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. A First Friday reception will begin at 5:30 with complimentary light refreshments. An auction of some of the handmade gingerbread creations will also occur during the reception.

A silent auction, holiday mart, gingerbread voting, and food from Z&D Fries will be available. Kitchen Craft, the presenting co-sponsor, will be giving cooking demonstrations using its cookware on Friday at 12:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. and Saturday at 9:30 a.m.,11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. If you attend the celebration on Friday by 5:15 p.m.; be sure to wear your ugliest holiday sweater! One lucky sweater will win a $100 Gift Card from Scott and Company Fine Jewelers.

The Holiday Mart is the ideal place to pick up a unique gift for the person on your list who has everything. This will replace the traditional Holiday Mart normally held at the ACAC. Vendors include, Kids Knitz (childrens hand knitted sweaters and accessories), Wendy Heiges Jewelry, Textures by Westmoreland, Parfections Chocolates, Sanders Crafts (jewelry, bead crafts), Bobbie Becker Gallery and Foxxy Moxxy, Sandra Marshall (homemade soaps, lotions and more), Gettysburg Watercolors by Tom Rooney, Sarajevo Phoenix Fair Trade Project (handcrafted items made by Bosnian War Widows), Erin Brown (postcards, paintings and magnets, Levato Shaw (door swags, wreaths and more.)

There is also a ton of fun for the kids! The YWCA Gettysburg & Adams County will present “Holiday Stories from Around the World” in the Fireplace Room from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Friday, only. Children of all ages are invited to learn how childreIMG_4854lowresn around the world celebrate Christmas as well as other holidays throughout the year. See pictures of holiday clothing, food, and traditions practiced all over the world. Stories will be presented every 15 minutes.

“Just Kids” at Gettysburg Dental Associates is excited to once again sponsor the children’s activities at the Gingerbread Celebration. Join “Just Kids” on Friday and Saturday at their craft station and make a fun winter or Christmas themed fingerprint bookmark.

Children ages 9 and up can enjoy a special opportunity to make their own wooden pen or pencil under the direction of the Cumberland Valley Woodworkers on Friday and Saturday while supplies last. A minimum $5 donation to the ACAC is recommended.

Santa Claus will visit on Saturday only from noon until 1:30 p.m.

info

 

 

Fifth Annual Art at the Winery

Posted on: September 15th, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

by Polly Patrono-Carlson

wine-bottle-sizes-4If you go back to the Greeks and Romans, they talk about all three – wine, food, and art – as a way of enhancing life.

~Robert Mondavi

On September 20, Hauser Estate Winery will host the 5th annual Art at the Winery, a large outdoor art show featuring art, music, demonstrations and wine. Every year, members of the Adams County Arts Council come up the hill to present their works of art in this tranquil and beautiful setting.  The event is free and open to the public, and includes live music and demonstrations.  Art, great food, and wine can be purchased.

Gloria Saloky will be demonstrating Belly Dancing from 1:30-2:00 p.m. and Erica Woodworth will be doing a wheel throwing demonstration from 3:30-4:00 p.m.

Along with paintings and pottery, there will be Plein Art Artist painting the fabulous Hauser Estate scenery.Hauser Arts & Vinyards2 005

Wander around, gaze, sip, and listen to music by Ron Nicodemus from 2-3:30. There may be a priceless work of art waiting for you to take home and enhance your life!

Hauser Arts & Vinyards2 019

 

List of artists presenting at Art at the Winery:

Sally Becker – painting, pottery and mixed media

Carrie Dietrich – artist

Moises Martinez – oil paintings

Peter Plant – plein air paintings

Erica Woodworth – pottery

Lori Nelson – pottery

Marianne Kingston – crocheted jewelry

Wendy Heiges – handmade jewelry

Anne Finucane – etchings and pastels

Laurie McKelvie – pastels

Debbie Westmoreland – fiberwork

Arts Council table

Bert Danielson – photography

Larry Brogan – photography

Ciji Lo’Ren – leather purses

Dave Laskowski – black and white photography

Caroline Laskowski   fiber artist, beaded bags

Food by Sherry Freeman at Ragged Edge.

 

What’s New this Summer? Castles, Doodles, Dinosaurs and more!

Posted on: May 29th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

Nearly 40 summer camps are “ready to roll” at the ACAC this summer! Wendy Heiges, Program Director at the ACAC, says the process of putting together children’s camps never ceases to amaze her.

“Every year the instructors propose even more imaginative, creative classes than the year before,” she explains. “This summer’s lineup includes many tried and true classic camps, but also many fantastic, new camps that draw on the incredible talents that our Adams County art teachers and artists will share with children of all ages.”

NEW summer camps for 2015 include:

fishSwim with the Fish! June 15-19 (ages 11-14), 1-4 pm  Paper Mache, that is!  Starting with a balloon, create a form out of paper mache that becomes your favorite whimsical or realistic fish. Throw your own style into this interesting project-there is no right or wrong!  Paint and embellish for pizzazz! Erica Woodworth $145 (member $135) Register

3D Architectural & Figurative Sculpture, June 22-26 (ages 11-14), 10-1 pm  Study & apply the architectural &sculptural work of Alberto Giacometti, Deborah Butterfield and Frank Gehr, to your own designs as you sculpt a human or animal figure and its habitat. Using basic sculptural techniques, create your 3D forms usingwire, plaster, paper mache& natural materials. Sally Becker$155 (member $145) Register

castleCastles, Castles, Castles, July 6-10 (ages 8-11), 1-4 pm  If you think castles are cool, join us for a week filled with castle exploration and construction.  Learn about the various features of castles and how they were improved during the Middle-Ages.  Build and decorate a castle using a variety of materials and found objects. Dawn Magee$155 (member $145) Register

From Doodle to Masterpiece, July 13th-17th (ages 9-12), 9-12 pm  Doodling is a fun way to create interesting artwork by using lines, patterns and your imagination.  Explore a variety of basic techniques in black and white, and enhance your doodles using colored pencils and markers.  Create a masterpiece by incorporating the doodling techniques learned.Joh Ricci  $155 (member $145) Register

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Postcards from the Edge!  July 13-17 (ages 11-14), 1-4 pm  Create artwork postcards that tell your summer story.  Find your artistic style while learning the traditional format of a postcard-scrapbook style-using mixed media, photography, collage, paint and more.  Discover layering and composition techniques, working with ink resist and making your own collage papers.  Emily Hoponick$155 (member $145) Register

DinosaurDynamic Dinosaurs!July 20-24 (ages 5-7), 1-4 pm  Draw, paint & collage your way through the world of dinosaurs!  Your favorite dinosaurs will come to life as you workwith cool materials like oil pastels & metallic markers. Incorporate elements of design using patterns & textures.  Homemade dinosaur cookies & story time too!  Emily Hoponick$155 (member $145) Register

op artOp Art, July 20-24 (ages 10-12), 1-4 pm  Take a look at Op Art, a 1960s style of art that makes use of optical illusion and you’ll discover the math-based precise composition is designed to trick the eye.Create your own abstract designs, while learning new techniques as you learn about op-art artists and the movement. Kim Robinson $150 (member $140) Register

Pop Art,July 27-31 (ages 8-11), 9-12 pm  Explore the bright imagery of the pop art culture and create fun, vivid art work of objects that are meaningful to you while working with multi-media & various mediums.  Delve into self-portraits and icons of today too!  “Once you got pop, you can never see it the same way again.”  Melissa Jackson $155 (member $145) Register

tee peeThe Art of Native American StorytellingAugust 10-15 (ages 7-10), 1-4 p.m.  Using oil pastels, colored and watercolor pencils, draw and paint your interpretations of the fascinating creation stories and myths of the Native Americans. Become immersed in their vast culture and create artwork that tells your story.  Make traditional fry bread to celebrate! Emily Hoponick $155 (member $145) Register

The Art of Mask Making, August 10-14 (ages 8-11), 9-12 pm  Masks have been used throughout history for theatrical performances, royalty, ceremonies, hunting, portrait masks and more.  Apply layers of paper macheover a mask template to create your own unique cultural mask inspired by history.  Embellishments add to the fun!  Stanley Gilmore$155 (member $145) Register

Intermediate Guitar Workshop: Write Your Own Music, Saturday, August 8, 9-3 pm (13 and up) Have you been playing the guitar for a few years and are a beginning songwriter?  Learn to build your song and incorporate solos into the key you’re playing and writing.  Covers chord theory and scales, and hands-on demos.  Record what you’ve learned! Mark Wesling $150 (member $140)  Register

Chef Camp for Foodies, August 3-5 Intermediate skill level, (9 and up), 9-11 am, 9-11 am, and 9-noon  Do you love to experiment in the kitchen?  Addicted to cooking shows?  If you know the basics and would like to improve your skills and techniques, this is the camp for you.  We’ll play, “what’s in the cabinet,” develop new ways to create culinary successes with some tried and true ingredients, and put it all together for a 3rd day feast. Chris Rinehart, $106 ($102)Register

Build a House Out of Clay! July 13-17 (ages 9-11), 1-4 pm  Have fun with clay as you design and draw and build the house of your dreams!  Lay out the design on clay slab and create your own custom built 3D house.  Develop hand-building, sculpting technique, scale, and proportion skills. 4 days of clay building & 1 day of glazing.   Erica Woodworth $155 (member $145) Register

Check out the full listing of nearly 40 Summer Camps 2015 by clicking here and register your child(ren) today!

Or give a gift certificate to a special child in your life so that he/she can attend a summer camp (call 717-334-5006 to learn more) and please note that camp scholarships are available (click here for info–scroll down to “Children’s Summer Camps”).

 

 

Art and Music: Like PB & J

Posted on: May 20th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

PB&J

Peanut butter and jelly… peas and carrots… best friends like Bert and Ernie, Snoopy and Woodstock… Rock and roll…

These are all things that are linked together. What famous pairings come to mind for you?

How about art and music?

Wendy Heiges, Adams County Arts Council Program Director, believes the two art forms work together in perfect harmony.

“Music sets the mood and evokes emotions, inspires us, moves us and promotes artistic creativity,” she explains. “Music can serve as an incredible tool—consider how education is enhanced through music. For example, we all learn our ABCs by singing them to music.”

These are some of the reasons the ACAC is offering numerous Children’s Summer Camps that integrate art and music, offering children multi-sensory, creative experiences:

Start with Art for Pre-Schoolers, June 15-19 (ages 3-4), 9:30-11:30 am   Begin a lifelong passion for creativity by exploring art through music, movement, crafts, stories and more. Cultivate your child’s imagination and develop early learning skills while having fun with new friends and activities. A different theme every day!  Ann Walsh $105 (member $98) Register

Ballerinas & Bears, June 22-26 (ages 3-5), 9:30-11:30 am  If you’re a beginner ballerina or dancer, this fun-filled class is for you!  You’ll learn the elements of ballet and creative movement, wear your favorite costumes, and we’ll have a dancing teddy bear party and performance last camp day.  Hope VonSas $90 (member $83) Register

Turn Songs into Paintings, June 8-12 (ages 8-10), 9-12 pm  Do colors have sound? Can music become shapes? Learn how artist Kandinsky used shapes and colors as “notes” to make visual artwork. Create your own collection of unique paintings using watercolor, pastel, & printmaking skills while listening to music. Sally Becker $155 (member $145) Register

Check out the full listing of nearly 40 Summer Camps 2015 by clicking here and register your child(ren) today!

Or give a gift certificate to a special child in your life so that he/she can attend a summer camp (call 717-334-5006 to learn more) and please note that camp scholarships are available (click here for info–scroll down to “Children’s Summer Camps”).

 

 

Xuchialt Artists and Upper Adams High School Art Students featured in May

Posted on: April 30th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

Written by Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator

Nicaraguan Dancers

Nicaraguan Dancers

The Adams County Arts Council will showcase the artwork of five artists from the Taller Artistico Xuchialt of Leon, Nicaragua during the month of May in the Reception Hall at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center, 125 S. Washington Street.  The show will include artwork by students, Xuchialt teachers and Adams County artists.  A First Friday reception on May 15-7:30 p.m. will feature a 15 minute full costumed demonstration of traditional dance starting at 5:30 p.m.

The 5 Nicaraguan artists will feature artwork produced at the Taller Artistico Xuchialt School of Art, which is supported by Project Gettysburg-Leon.  The four year program is officially accredited by the Nicaraguan Ministry of Culture and teaches over 120 students each year.  Gina Robinson of Project Gettysburg-Leon says, “All of the teachers are volunteers. They do this for the love of art. It’s a very exciting thing for the arts community to have people so passionate about sharing their arts and culture.”

Marlon Moreno, Xuchialt artist

Marlon Moreno, Xuchialt artist

The Xuchialt artists are scheduled to teach a Primitivista Paint Night at the ACAC on Tuesday, May 5th, from 6-9 p.m. during their three week visit.  The evening will feature folkloric dancing, Nicaraguan folk music and primitivista painting, a bright and colorful form of Nicaraguan painting with common themes of flora, fauna, community life and historical events.  Robinson comments, “It’s a true cultural exchange.  They’re teaching us, we’re teaching them.  This is a chance to share in the growing friendship between Leon, and Adams County.”

The Upper Adams High School art students under the instruction of Lisa Harman will be showing their 2D and 3D artwork in the Studio at the Arts Education Center during the month of May, as well.  A May 1st First Friday student reception will be held in the studio from 5-7:00 p.m.  Their artwork will remain hanging through mid-June.

Upper Adams student work

Upper Adams student work

To register for the Primitivista Paint Night, or for more information about the Taller Artistico Xuchialt exhibit, the Upper Adams High School student show and other upcoming Arts Council exhibitions, news and events or art classes at the Arts Council’s Arts Education Center, visit www.adamsarts.org or call (717) 334-5006.

The Adams County Arts Council’s mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community.

Painting by Bryan Diaz

Painting by Bryan Diaz

Award winning artist Carol Herren Foerster to exhibit drawings at the ACAC in April

Posted on: April 2nd, 2015 by Karen Hendricks
Bok Choy by Carol Herren Foerster

Bok Choy by Carol Herren Foerster

Award winning artist Carol Herren Foerster will be exhibiting a selection of pencil drawings in the Studio at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center during the month of April.  The Arts Council will host an artist’s reception on Friday, April 3rd, from 5-7:30 p.m. at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center located at 125 S. Washington Street, Gettysburg.

“Drawings by Carol Herren Foerster,” represents a range of pencil drawing artwork to include portrait drawings on a larger scale, as well as drawings from nature.  Foerster, with more than 40 years of experience, approaches each piece with a fresh eye and credits her ability to successfully convey light and shadow with each piece by “working from left to right to avoid smearing the graphite.”

Foerster will be offering some tips on how to draw in black and white areas and discussing her pencil drawing techniques on Wednesday, April 22, 1-2:30 p.m. at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center.  The fee is $15 and registration is open.

Click here for more information about Spring 2015 classes at the ACAC including Foester’s pencil technique class, or call (717) 334-5006.

The Adams County Arts Council’s mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community.

Artist Spotlight: Melissa Swift and the Recyclable Art Contest

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

20150327_152842_resized“If you can see beauty in everything, you are an artist.” –Anonymous

Melissa Swift has been teaching art at Fairfield Elementary School since 2007, a position she filled after Adams County Arts Council (ACAC) Board Member Louise Garverick retired. Melissa credits Louise with connecting her to ACAC and introducing her to the Recyclable Art Contest and Exhibit, an event sponsored by the Gettysburg Recycling Committee and McDonald’s, which invites students across Adams County to submit pieces constructed entirely of recyclable materials. This year marks the show’s 20th year, making it the most long-lived event at the the ACAC.

Before inviting her students to showcase their work at ACAC, Melissa holds her own contest at Fairfield Elementary. Participation is voluntary – it’s not a graded project. The children work on their recyclable art projects at home, but the kids look forward to participating every year. She does set aside one day of class time to talk about why it’s important to recycle and to show examples of past projects, encouraging students to think about how they can turn someone else’s trash into an aesthetically pleasing treasure. This year, she discovered students had already started their projects before she even announced the contest. Fairfield Elementary’s contest boasts 48 entries this year, all of which will be invited to participate in the exhibit at ACAC. “There were actually fewer entries this year than last,” Melissa said, “but they are all of high quality, so they will all be invited to participate.” Melissa works hard to teach the children how to transform their work to its highest potential, worthy of aesthetic appreciation.

For the ACAC contest and exhibit, each student may submit one work of art that does not exceed a size of 36 inches in any direction, and that is constructed entirely of recyclable materials. The projects are rated by a panel of judges based on the following criteria:

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Claudia Bricker (2nd grade) points to her garden collage constructed with all recycled materials. Claudia received First place in 2014 in the Fairfield Elementary Show.

  • integration and transformation,
  • creativity, individuality, originality and uniqueness
  • and presentation.

Cash prizes are awarded to the top four entries in each of the following categories:

  • Grades K-2
  • Grades 3-5
  • Grades 6-8
  • Grades 9-12

One piece will be selected as
best in show.

Artists are invited to submit their projects on March 31 and April 1, and the show will open to the public for First Friday on April 3. Awards will be presented on Saturday, April 18. A People’s Choice award will also be presented – be sure to visit the show to cast your vote, and reinforce the message that if we stop to look long enough, there truly is beauty in everything.

Some photos of the Fairfield Elementary entries for 2015:

2015pieces

Photos: A Magical Evening with Kelly Corrigan

Posted on: March 26th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

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It was most likely the largest crowd ever assembled in the Adams County Arts Council–close to a sellout crowd enjoyed a fun evening full of laughter and great conversation with New York Times bestselling author Kelly Corrigan last Friday, March 20. Many thanks to all who came!

Also a huge thank you to the following sponsors:

Event sponsors:

ENJOY the following photos, capturing the FUN spirit of the evening, by photographer Casey Martin. (Tip: Keep an eye out for some of these photos to appear in the next issue of Celebrate Gettysburg magazine.)

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Setting the scene for a lovely evening: live jazz music by Pomona’s Trio

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Lively bidding–some of it competitive–on the evening’s silent auction items!

 

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WellSpan Gettysburg Hospital President Jane Hyde (Title Sponsor) with author Kelly Corrigan and Adams County Arts Council Executive Director Chris Glatfelter

 

 

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Event Co-Chair Lisa Cadigan welcomes the crowd

 

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The one and only Kelly Corrigan!

 

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Attendees enjoyed meeting Kelly and having their copies of Glitter and Glue signed

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There were even a few brave men in attendance!

 

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The event’s planning committee, the ACAC Marketing Committee with Kelly Corrigan

 

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What made the committee laugh? Kelly said, “Remember it’s almost ‘the best part of the day.'” (You had to be there… to get the joke.) 🙂

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Event Sponsors
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Artist Spotlight: Linda Fauth

Posted on: March 11th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks
Linda Fauth, "at home" in the ACAC's kitchen

Linda Fauth, “at home” in the ACAC’s kitchen

St. Patrick’s Day is upon us and seems like the perfect time to profile a culinary instructor who enjoys focusing on “spring greens.”

Linda Fauth, long-time consumer science (“home ec”) teacher, may be retired, but she is still enjoying sharing her culinary and creative skills with a new group of students of all ages, through classes at the ACAC.

A native of Red Lion, in nearby York County, Linda says she inherited many of her talents from her mother. “She was a great cook and seamstress,” Linda explains, “So the apple didn’t fall far from the tree!”

After graduating from Albright College with a degree in family & consumer science, a move to New Jersey, and the earning of her master’s degree in education, Linda settled in Adams County in 1978.

She taught numerous classes including culinary and nutrition classes to middle schoolers in the Upper Adams School District, for more than 30 years, retiring in 2011.

Since then, she has taught numerous adult and children’s classes at the ACAC, including a tofu workshop; one of the highlights was creating a chocolate silk pie made with tofu.

“I have good, standard recipes I’ve used for many years, but I’m always trying new things,” Linda says. “Cooking Light is my favorite book and magazine for discovering new recipes.”

A previous class participant

A previous class participant

Linda is always modifying her classes, especially to reflect the trend towards more healthful eating.

Her next class for adults, “Spring Market Cooking,” includes several recipes featuring kale, considered one of the healthiest, nutrient-dense foods.

Spring Market Cooking!  Thursday, May 14, 6-8:30 pm Learn creative ways to prepare healthy appetizers, entrees and desserts using kale, asparagus and spring’s lush bounty.  Prepare and eat a kale salad, Portuguese kale soup, fruit salsa, a light entrée and something sweet and sumptuous for dessert.  Linda Fauth, $45 ($42 member) Register

One of Linda's former ACAC students proudly displays her edible creation!

One of Linda’s former ACAC students proudly displays her edible creation!

Linda also enjoys teaching 9, 10 and 11-year olds, through summer arts camps at the ACAC. Three years in a row, she has taught students how to make kid-friendly dishes they can easily replicate at home: smoothies, soft pretzels, mini pizzas, macaroni and cheese, and more.

“Sewing is Fun” is another popular camp Linda has taught for several summers. She abides by a special motto when it comes to her students’ creations. “I always tell my students they should like their projects and finish them—I always stay after class to help students finish sewing their projects if need be.”

Here are Linda’s upcoming 2015 summer arts camps:

Sewing is Fun! July 27-31 (ages 9-11) 1-4 pm  Spend the week learning both hand and machine sewing skills and see how easy sewing can be… and fun too!  Choose your own fabric and create your very own chef’s apron, a tote bag, and decorative pillows. Linda Fauth $152 (member $142) Register

Cooks in the Kitchen July 20-24 (ages 9-11), 9-12 pm  Begin your journey into the culinary world by learning about nutritious fun foods. Develop confidence around the kitchen- learn about proper measurements, safety issues and what kitchen tools to use! Make favorites: soft pretzels, orange julius, ice cream, mac and cheese, and fresh salsa and more! Linda Fauth $160 ($150) Register

Previous "Sewing is Fun" campers

Previous “Sewing is Fun” campers

One of Linda's previous kids' cooking camps

One of Linda’s previous kids’ cooking camps

Previous "Sewing is Fun" campers

Previous “Sewing is Fun” campers

Spending time in the kitchen isn’t a chore to Linda: “The kitchen here (at the ACAC) is awesome—it’s so easy to set up and involve the class in the cooking process. Afterwards, there’s plenty of room for us to eat as well!”

When she’s not cooking at the ACAC, Linda enjoys spending time as a food and wellness volunteer through the Penn State Extension Service, making presentations to schools, business meetings, and other groups. One of their current programs is called Dining with Diabetes.

She also enjoys sewing for her grandchildren; her latest creations have included dresses, a Hawaiian shirt, a puppet theater, and alphabet charts.

Linda says her favorite, prized recipe of all time is a family recipe that’s been handed down for generations, for sticky buns. But she also enjoys making sourdough starter, baking bread, cakes, cookies and cream puffs.

Her neighbors likely consider themselves very lucky. She says she often shares her culinary creations with them—but along with those tasty treats comes a request: She always asks for their honest feedback on all new recipes. Sounds like a delicious relationship!

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An ABC chart Linda made for her grandchildren

 

 

 

 

Waldo’s Arts Community & Diane Cromer to exhibit at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center in March

Posted on: March 6th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

By Wendy Heiges, ACAC Program Coordinator

Artist: Chris Lauer

Artist: Chris Lauer

Waldo’s Arts Community artworks and Diane Cromer’s artworks will be on display at the Adams County Arts Council’s Arts Education Center, 125 S. Washington Street, during the month of March.  The ACAC will feature Waldo’s 2D and 3D artwork in the Gallery and Diane Cromer’s collection of artwork in the Studio and will host a First Friday reception from 5-7:30 p.m. on March 6th.  Along with the show openings, ACAC instructors, Jack Handshaw and Bert Danielson will be on hand to demonstrate their craft and The Storytellers will be performing live music as part of the First Friday festivities.

The Waldo’s Arts Community, formerly Waldo’s on Stratton, will demonstrate their diverse range of style and subject matter, to include painting, sculpture, photography, mixed media, printmaking, hand lettering and jewelry.  The 10 member group has been working separately and creating separately to prepare for the March 6th opening.  Prior to closing their doors last fall, Waldo’s was an active group of artists whose mission was to support and nurture the creative community.  The idea behind Waldo’s was to introduce young people to the creative lifestyle of art and music.  Founding member, Chris Laurer, says, “it will be a neat experience for this particular community of artists to come together as a group and show our work together.”  Lauer continues, “We have a few new members and I’m pleased that we’re still growing and finding new artists to be a part of this community.”

Artist: Diane Cromer

Artist: Diane Cromer

Also on display in the Studio through the month of March is a collection of realistic wildlife and landscape paintings and drawings by Hanover artist, Diane Cromer. Cromer, a self-taught artist started painting 30 years ago and is inspired to create work that conveys her appreciation of nature.  She says, “I like to place the viewer in the environment of the subject.  Our daily emotional survival depends on seeing beauty.”

For more information about Waldo’s Arts Community, Diane Cromer, other Arts Council exhibitions, art classes, news and events at the Arts Council’s Arts Education Center, call (717) 334-5006 or visit us today!

Gettysburg’s very own “Van Gogh” works with some of the biggest names in the performing arts

Posted on: March 3rd, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

We are thrilled to partner with Graphcom and Celebrate Gettysburg magazine as media sponsors for the March 20 event, An Evening with NY Times Best-Selling Author Kelly Corrigan! Today we spotlight an extremely creative and colorful division of Graphcom, Field and Floor FX:

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Have you ever created a 7-foot tall cotton candy treat? Doug Gardner, director of Field and Floor FX, has. No, this particular cotton candy won’t give you a monster-sized cavity, because it’s a prop.

Doug and the team at Field and Floor FX, a Graphcom company here in Adams County, work with some of the biggest names in performing arts. They print digital flags, floors, and costume fabrics, as well as create larger-than-life props for illustrious programs like the Santa Clara Vanguard Drum and Bugle Corps, of Santa Clara, California and Onyx Color Guard, of Dayton, Ohio.

Working hand in hand with the creative minds behind these performing groups, Field and Floor FX translates their vision in 3D, which often involves being elbow deep in paint, or whittling out impossibly cool props like the Michelangelo of high-density foam.

In a feat of visual interest, Field and Floor FX worked with Cypress Independent Color Guard, of Houston, Texas to create luggage props for their show, which, through reflection and stylistic approach, is an ode to the personal life of Marlene Dietrich.

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“There is a high degree of competition with and between the ensembles we work with,” Doug says. “We work with talented show designers to bring their visions to life. The inclusion of creative props can catapult the overall look of a show making it unique and setting it apart from the competition.”

The impact created by the oversized and scaled luggage pieces did just that for Cypress. The pieces were created using high-density foam blocks and were enhanced by vinyl graphics on all sides giving a 3D look from a distance, though the luggage pieces were actually flat on all sides.

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The Field and Floor FX team also created a number of show-stopping props for Santa Clara Vanguard Drum Corps 2014 production of Scheherazade. “It is incredibly rewarding to take someone’s vision and create something unique that surpasses their expectation,” Doug says. “The challenge with these creative endeavors is that not only must they be visually pleasing and help the ensembles tell their story, but they must also be extremely durable and logistically functional.”

The first of the projects for Scheherazade were 24 lightweight stacks of pillows that were utilized by performers during the production. Performers danced on top of them and created various staging opportunities that lent to the overall dramatic effect of the show. The pillows were hand carved from high-density foam for durability and strength. They were then hand painted. The last step to give the impression of real, sumptuous velvet pillows was to apply added detail through vinyl graphics. The finishing touch on this project was to attach tassels to each pillow, a design element that also connected the props to the drum corps’ costumes. (Click here for a brief YouTube clip of the performance, including the “pillows!”)

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This performance included unique feather fans created by Field and Floor FX to add to the overall effect and theme of the show. The bases of the fans were created using vacuumed form molded medallions.  Doug added ostrich and peacock feathers in a variety of colors to compliment the style and color pallet of the show design and costumes. Reflective mylar tape was added as a detail and special effect to catch and reflect the light giving the fans a majestic appearance.

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Field and Floor FX also created large-scale props using design elements that reflect and compliment the overall style and period of the show. The backdrops were created using vinyl graphics that were applied to contour shaped high-density PVC board. The colorful design element was carried over and used throughout the entire production. The large-scale props, fans, and pillows work together as a whole to paint a picture for the audience.

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Van Gogh said, “Great things are done by a series of small things brought together.” If this is indeed true, it is no wonder that all of the detail put in to each Field and Floor FX creation does its part to create a great show for the performing groups lucky enough to work with them.
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 To learn more about Field and Floor FX, click here!

Marcia Gregorio Leads Book Discussions Set for March 10

Posted on: February 26th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

trade paperback cover

The article below has been corrected, to reflect a weather-related postponement. The book discussions originally set for March 5 have been rescheduled for Tuesday, March 10 at 12 noon and 7 pm.

Long-time Gettysburg High School English teacher Marcia Gregorio will lead two free book discussions on Thursday March 10 at 12 noon and 7 pm at the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC), Gettysburg, focused on New York Times best-seller Glitter and Glue, leading up to an appearance by author Kelly Corrigan on her nationwide paperback release tour benefitting nonprofit organizations such as the ACAC. Corrigan’s appearance at the ACAC is set for March 20 at 6:30 pm.

“Relationships, families, generations… there are lots of layers and themes woven into the book Glitter and Glue,” explains Gregorio.

“It’s a coming-of-age story—Corrigan makes the discovery that her mother is a bigger force in her life than she realizes,” Gregorio says. “But more than that—Corrigan writes about coming full circle in her life and that’s what makes the book so interesting. I’ve never read anything exactly like it—it’s a unique book.”

The March 10 book discussions are free and open to the public; Gregorio encourages people to attend regardless of whether they have read Glitter and Glue. She believes the themes within the book will spark interesting discussions. “Enjoying literature, and helping others enjoy literature is something I find satisfying,” she says.

Gregorio, who taught high school English at Gettysburg Area High School for 21 years, is the mother of three children raised in the school district. She is now enjoying retirement including spending time with her grandchildren. Gregorio began her career by teaching French at a private high school in Haverford for seven years; she earned a master of arts degree in English literature from Shippensburg University and a master of fine arts in creative nonfiction writing from Goucher College.

Kelly Corrigan

Kelly Corrigan

Registration for the March 20 event “Glitter and Glue: An Evening with New York Times Best-Selling Author Kelly Corrigan” is $35 and includes:

  • a paperback copy of Glitter and Glue
  • the chance to meet and hear Corrigan speak
  • hors oeuvres and free wine
  • live music by local jazz group Pomona’s Trio
  • much more!

A limited number of VIP registrations are available for $50 including preferred seating and placement at the head of the line to meet Corrigan and have books personally signed. The event is a fundraiser for the ACAC, whose mission is to cultivate an arts-rich community. Registration is available by clicking here or by phone, 717-334-5006. The event is being held at the ACAC’s Arts Education Center, 125 South Washington Street, Gettysburg.

Glitter and Glue is a Ballantine Trade paperback, a division of Random House, published on February 17. Corrigan has now published three New York Times best-selling books, The Middle Place, Lift, and Glitter and Glue. Corrigan’s previous books explored her battle against breast cancer, as well as her relationship with her larger-than-life father. Click here to explore Kelly Corrigan’s website.

The March 20 event is presented by the ACAC in partnership with title sponsor WellSpan Gettysburg Hospital and media partner Graphcom/Celebrate Gettysburg magazine. Additional corporate community sponsors include: Carol Cook, Certified Doula; Gettysburg Dental Associates; Re/Max of Gettysburg – Suzanne Christianson; and Thrivent Financial – Jim Dunlop.

Book reviews for Glitter and Glue include: “Corrigan remains a lively, nimble cheerleader for the joys of family,” (People) and “This is the ordinary brilliance of Kelly Corrigan, the irresistible cocktail of lyrical writing and solid, useful insight,” (San Francisco Chronicle).

Ballentine Trade’s publicity materials state, “Reading a book by Kelly Corrigan is like having a heart-to-heart with your smartest, funniest confidante, and Glitter and Glue is no exception—it brims with hilarious, honest prose that will be sure to have everyone talking.”

Fight Cabin Fever with the ACAC

Posted on: January 5th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

Cold January days are here, but the arts council had two fantastic events this weekend that can help you combat “cabin fever:”

Have movie moxie? Let your trivia skills shine at our Jan 9 Trivia Contest!

Have movie moxie? Let your trivia skills shine at our Jan 9 Trivia Contest!

The Pike Restaurant, 985 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg, will offer a special Trivia Contest on Friday, January 9, from 6-8 p.m. to benefit the Adams County Arts Council.  Draft a team of up to eight players or join a team that evening and test your general knowledge of subjects like pop culture, sports, history, movies, geography, music and literature.  Cost to play is a $10 donation per person to the Arts Council. Each member of the winning team receives a $20 gift card from The Pike. For more information about the trivia contest or to reserve a table, contact the Pike at 717 334-9227.  For more information about Arts Council classes, programs or membership, contact 717-334-5006aa@adamsarts.org, or visit adamsarts.org.

It Happened One Summer by Dianne Lorden

It Happened One Summer by Dianne Lorden

Eight accomplished artists, members of the Gettysburg or Susquehanna Valley Plein Air Painters groups, will be coming in out of the cold for a Plein Air Paint-In at the Center on Saturday, January 10. From 10 a.m. to 12 noon, you’re invited to see how these artists approach a plein air-type painting and watch as different interpretations of the same bouquet or still life emerge.  The paintings, which may be purchased either framed or unframed, will go on sale from noon to 2 p.m.

Enjoy hot beef vegetable, carrot ginger or crab soup (eat-in or take-out) served up by Arts Council members. You may also choose to purchase soup in hand-carved stoneware bowls by potter Lori Nelson.

There is no admission charge for the event. The artists, all of whom are donating their sales to the Arts Council, include event organizer Barb Ebaugh, Cortez Lawrence, Paul J. Gallo, Claire Beadon Carnell, Larry Lerew, James Bricker, Kim Stone and Dianne Lorden.

Snow date for the Paint-In is Saturday, January 24.

Mary Luquette: Art is the “Key” to Life

Posted on: December 8th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

“Art has brought healing to my life. But it’s not only about that. To put art ‘out there’… it’s fantastic to have others benefit from viewing it and learning about my story.”

Mary Luquette of Gettysburg believes art truly saved her life. It’s the “key” to her story…

Mary Luquette (Photo Credit: Karen Hendricks)

Mary Luquette (Photo Credit: Karen Hendricks)

“Growing up, I wanted to be a fashion designer but my parents said ‘no—be practical,’” she explains. “I always sewed, always had an interest in art and fiber, and although it wasn’t the focus of my career, I got into quilting.”

Mary Luquette 4She says quilting and fiber arts came naturally to her. “I have always felt as though I ‘know colors’ and can put different colors and fabrics together.”

But woven into the fabric of her adult life, were the tragic deaths of five family members including her husband.

“Life didn’t make sense, so it didn’t make sense to continue quilting,” Luquette says. “But creating fiber art as a form of expression brought tremendous healing.”

“I was surprised that I was also successful. I was seeing a counselor for the grief and she asked if I was going to keep them (the fiber artwork) under my bed forever. So I started showing and selling them.”

Mary Luquette 1The first art exhibition she entered was the Adams County Arts Council’s 2nd Annual Juried Arts Exhibition in 2005 and Luquette was awarded the prestigious “Best of Show.”

“It was an amazing feeling,” Luquette says. “Fiber art is more accepted today as ‘real’ art. But (nearly 10 years ago, in 2005,) I expected a painting or sculpture to win.”

That first award was a validation of her artistic talent; simultaneously, Luquette was also winning awards for her athletic ability. Running had become another outlet for her pain, and she became a successful triathlon and marathon competitor.

Even though Luquette had quickly become an award-winning artist, she realized two important things: “I wish art could pay the bills, but it’s very tough to make it financially as an artist,” she explains. In her ‘day job,’ Luquette works with autistic children.

Mary Luquette 6Secondly, she realized that she needed to deepen her artistic skills through classes at the arts council.

“I decided I wanted to study the basics because I never really considered myself a ‘real’ artist. I thought it was important to learn the basics—color and form.”

Luquette signed up for drawing, photography and painting classes, and is currently in her third series of drawing classes with Sara Little. “I think every teacher here at the arts council is very passionate about their subject. With Sara, I love her honesty—she’s very critical and she will give you feedback on how to fix your drawings.”

Mary Luquette 5She encourages others to take advantage of the wide range of classes available at the arts council. “My advice is to sign up,” she says. “People who say ‘I can’t’… all they need to do is practice. I don’t say ‘I can’t draw.’ Instead, I say ‘I don’t practice enough.’ That’s all it is.”

“You can’t expect to draw like DaVinci. Just like you can’t expect to run a 5K right away. You start walking and before you know it you’ll be running. I learned how to swim at the age of 60. I’m open to learning new skills. Everyone can learn–it provides an outlet. Some aspect of art is important to express who you are.”

Mary Luquette 3Luquette has taken numerous fiber art classes including week-long sessions in New York state. She estimates that she’s created hundreds of collage and/or fabric art pieces by now.

“Last year my sister died of Alzheimer’s Disease at age 54. I’m inspired to continue creating, by life events,” she says. “The arts are a great way to express things when we can’t verbalize them.”

You could say that art is the key that unlocked her ability to cope with life’s ups and downs… a defining statement from Luquette, especially considering the meaning of “Luquette,” a Canadian/French surname that refers to the occupation of a locksmith.

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To check the ACAC’s list of current classes, click here

To contact Mary Luquette, click here for her email address

To learn more about her story, click here for JourneyThroughGrief.com

Mary Luquette 2

In the Artist Spotlight: Debbie Westmoreland

Posted on: November 5th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

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You could say that everything Debbie Westmoreland does, she does with style.

From fashioning Barbie doll clothes at the age of six, to working for a major New York department store, and curating historical exhibits—all of these experiences have put her on a path that recently brought her to Gettysburg where she now shares her creative gifts through the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC).

Detail, "Floral Abstract", wool and silk

Detail, “Floral Abstract”, wool and silk

By day, Westmoreland may be one of the friendly smiling faces visitors encounter when they enter the ACAC and are greeted by support staff. But Westmoreland is also part of the huge network of talented instructors who lead classes at the arts council. She has taught interior design classes for adults as well as fashion design classes for the children’s afterschool and summer programs. Additionally, her textile art has been featured in numerous ACAC exhibits. And she continues to learn and grow as an artist, by taking classes from other arts council instructors.

“I’ve always been interested in textiles, fashion and history,” the Gettysburg woman explains. “And my career path is an example of that… but being in this environment has given me the confidence to truly pursue being an artist (for the first time),” she explains.

Fiber art by Debbie Westmoreland

Fiber art by Debbie Westmoreland

It’s been a long, winding road for Westmoreland, who learned how to sew at a young age, from her mother and grandmothers as she grew up in the Reading area. “My Pennsylvania German heritage made me appreciate the importance of textiles,” she claims.

Even though her heart was in the fashion industry, her head steered her towards a more practical college major—design and merchandising—at Drexel University, Philadelphia. While working in retailing for Bergdorf Goodman in New York City, she realized she needed a creative outlet. So she decided to go back to school for her BFA in interior design from the New York School of Interior Design.

After working at several design firms in New York and New Jersey, Westmoreland again sought a more creative path—with a twist. “I realized I wanted to tie my love of history into my work.” She again headed back to school, studying at Seaton Hall, for her Master of Arts in Museum Professions.

This led to a position she describes as “one of the most creative experiences I’ve ever had”–Curator and Collections Manager for the Morris County Historical Society in New Jersey—a position she held for 13 years.

In 2011, when her husband reached retirement age, the couple decided to relocate to Gettysburg. “This area is a welcoming and nurturing setting for artists,” she explains. “It’s hard for me to create in a crowded, fast-paced environment, but Adams County is a comfortable environment, (more conducive to producing artwork).”

In addition to exhibiting her work periodically through members’ shows at the ACAC, her stylish fashions and textile artwork can both be found at A&A Village Treasures, Chambersburg Street, Gettysburg.

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“I feel as though I’m finally underway as an independent artist—it’s another step or chapter in my career,” she says. All achieved with her ever-evolving flair for style.

To contact Debbie Westmoreland: westmorelanddebbie (at) gmail.com

"Fantasy Turquoise," a wrap by Debbie Westmoreland

“Fantasy Turquoise,” a wrap by Debbie Westmoreland

 

Detail, "Fantasy Turquoise"

Detail, “Fantasy Turquoise”

 

Artist Spotlight: Andrew Smith

Posted on: October 9th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Photography is an art form that magically captures a single moment.  The photographer freezes time for a split second allowing viewers to zoom in on details that may otherwise have passed us by.  But what if the photographer not only captures a moment, but also creates it?  This is a question ACAC member artist Andrew Smith addresses, particularly with his abstract photography.  “One can pose individuals in a portrait or choose how far to focus in on a still life, but the photographer typically can’t change the subject. [My] abstract work adds an extra dimension to the creative process,” says Smith, who has manipulated and captured colored liquids in varying states with macro-photography to pleasing results.  His pieces have been included in ACAC’s annual Abstract Show for the past two years.

This piece appeared in the Adams County Arts Council's 2014 Abstract Show last summer.

Fluid III appeared in the Adams County Arts Council’s 2014 Abstract Show last summer.

Andrew Smith experiments with subjects in both liquid and solid forms.

Andrew Smith experiments with subjects in both liquid and solid forms.

As a full-time middle school music teacher and band director at Susquenita Middle School, Andrew doesn’t aggressively pursue photography as a career right now, but he feels fortunate to have been included in several juried shows, and has some items for sale in the Frame Shop & Gallery in Hanover.  In addition to his macro-liquid shots, he has a great eye for landscapes, and hosted nine “photo-walks” in the area from 2008-2013, availing area participants to photograph interesting scenes and share their results on a custom Flickr page.

Lost in Death was shot during a Photo Walk, and appeared in

Lost in Death was shot during a Photo Walk, and appeared in the 2012 Gettysburg Festival juried exhibit.

Andrew not only made these tortilla chips, he seasoned them to a perfection requiring no dips, and then captured them in a tantalizing photograph.

Andrew not only made these tortilla chips, he also seasoned them to a perfection requiring no dip, and then captured them in a tantalizing photograph.

Regardless of subject matter, however, Andrew enjoys the entire process of his projects – from composition through printing and choosing the mattes and frames for finished pieces. Perusing his portfolio, you will find that in addition to nature, landscapes and abstracts, Andrew is also a foodie – enjoying the creation and manipulation of recipes, which he then captures in tantalizing images before sharing and eating his art.

Creativity obviously infuses all he does, and like most creative folks who know to value process over outcome, the results for the rest of us are quite good. You can see more of Andrew’s work on his website, Visual Realia, and you can follow him on Facebook, Twitter and Flickr.

Photos © Andrew Smith. Reproduction of any image is prohibited without express consent of the artist.

 

 

 

Stoneware Fish, Monkey Muffins and More Summer Highlights

Posted on: September 11th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks
Edible Art Campers

Edible Art Campers

“She said she loved camp everyday!” That is just one of the dozens of rave reviews pouring into our office, in the wake of the ACAC Summer Arts Camp schedule. Now that school is back in session, we miss the excitement and creativity sparked by children dancing and skipping through our building, making all kinds of colorful projects—some of them even edible, and seeing their fantastic imaginations at work. We hope we sparked a life-long appreciation of the arts, and we hope they return for After School Classes and/or next year’s Summer Arts Camps.

Sewing Camp!

Sewing Camp!

Until then, we are thankful for much positive feedback and want to share a few reviews:

  • Mr. Jack is wonderful. Kind and patient! Great instructor!
  • I am impressed with the quantity, variety, and quality of projects. She liked the drawing projects best.
  • This was an amazing camp and it definitely met all my expectations.
  • End of class presentation was excellent.
  • Mr. Gilmore was an excellent instructor and the class project was enjoyed by my son.
  • They came home talking about all the great things they learned each day!
  • The best (comment) is “look what I can do!”
  • Enjoyable experience – nice that parents/siblings can have some tasty treats too.
  • “I love it Mom! The teachers are so nice. We make great food!”
Learn to Play Guitar Camp

Learn to Play Guitar Camp

Fun with Impressionism Camp

Fun with Impressionism Camp

On the questionnaires, parents were asked to rate their child(ren)’s arts camps on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the highest rating. When we tallied the results, we found that:

  • More than 8 in 10 parents gave us a rating of “5.”
  • 95% of all parents rated our camps as being either a “4” or “5.”
  • For enjoyment of projects, parents’ average rating was 4.86
  • Parents’ average rating of summer arts camp teachers was 4.89
  • Did the class meet your expectation? Parents’ average rating was 4.77.
Photo Camp project!

Photo Camp project!

Fun with Weaving Camp

Fun with Weaving Camp

What did your child enjoy most? Here are just a sampling of the happy answers:

  • Making stoneware fish
  • Rolling the dough for monkey muffins
  • Using the big loom
  • I liked making new friends
  • The watermelon cake
  • Working with the candy clay
  • Creating comic book
  • Making a mug
  • Learning how to make pottery on wheel. Lots of fun!
  • Making the apron
  • Making the bracelets
  • Having a nice teacher
Preschoolers work on their Hungry Caterpillar books

Campers work on their Hungry Caterpillar books

What projects were your child’s favorites? When asked this question, we received more than 100 different answers. So, we got creative and made a piece of “word art” to demonstrate the answers! The larger words were responses we received multiple times. Enjoy!

Fave Art Projects Summer 2014

 

Are you inspired? Click here for our current Class Schedule including all Adult Classes, Preschool Classes and After School Classes. And enjoy a few more summer memories, below:

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Under the Sea Camp

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Dance Camp!

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Comic Book Camp

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Cooking Extravaganza campers enjoy their soft pretzels

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Edible art creations!

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Cooking Extravaganza Camp

 

Have I Got a Story for You!! Storytelling and More Camp

Have I Got a Story for You!! Storytelling and More Camp

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Sewing is Fun Camp

Adventures in Abstract Art

Posted on: July 22nd, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Robyn Warren - DaveLisa VinoOpportunities for adventure are endless with abstract art.  Whether you claim to “like it” or not, abstract art invites an audience to participate in the creative process.  Because the pieces often do not represent identifiable objects, viewers are taken on an adventure of the senses, drawing on individual experiences and emotions: Does that shade of purple evoke the soft color and smell of flowers in your grandmother’s garden?  Do those undulating blues remind you of a trip to the beach with a long-lost love, making you melancholy? Or do they remind you of a vacation you took last week with a new love, evoking a sensation of bursting happiness?  Whatever you are feeling, the person standing next to you may be simultaneously on a different, but equally relevant emotional adventure.

This phenomenon only allows the adventure to continue.  Once we have processed our own feelings about a piece, we can discuss our impressions and feelings with a friend… or a stranger.  Will you bond over the experience of the piece with the person next to you, or will you engage in a debate, so moved are you by the feelings that no other interpretation seems possible?

Continuing the adventure still, we can imagine the motives of the artists who created the pieces.  Is Arlyn Pettingell’s “Night Ocean” a peaceful sea or a harrowing one? Is there a storm threatening a lovely sky, or are the soft yellows and pinks glimmers of the calm that follows the storm?Pettingell

If you would like to find out, join us for the ACAC’s Abstract Show adventure, which peaks on Friday, August 1 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. with a First Friday reception at the Adams County Arts Council’s Education Center, 125 South Washington Street, Gettysburg, PA, and will continue throughout the month of August.  The show offers a diverse range of style and subject matter in a variety of media, including paintings, photography, sculpture, and mixed media.  Artists will be in attendance at the reception to discuss their work, and all pieces are for sale.

Handshaw

 

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