Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County, PA

Posts Tagged ‘pottery’

Fifth Annual Art at the Winery

Posted on: September 15th, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

by Polly Patrono-Carlson

wine-bottle-sizes-4If you go back to the Greeks and Romans, they talk about all three – wine, food, and art – as a way of enhancing life.

~Robert Mondavi

On September 20, Hauser Estate Winery will host the 5th annual Art at the Winery, a large outdoor art show featuring art, music, demonstrations and wine. Every year, members of the Adams County Arts Council come up the hill to present their works of art in this tranquil and beautiful setting.  The event is free and open to the public, and includes live music and demonstrations.  Art, great food, and wine can be purchased.

Gloria Saloky will be demonstrating Belly Dancing from 1:30-2:00 p.m. and Erica Woodworth will be doing a wheel throwing demonstration from 3:30-4:00 p.m.

Along with paintings and pottery, there will be Plein Art Artist painting the fabulous Hauser Estate scenery.Hauser Arts & Vinyards2 005

Wander around, gaze, sip, and listen to music by Ron Nicodemus from 2-3:30. There may be a priceless work of art waiting for you to take home and enhance your life!

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List of artists presenting at Art at the Winery:

Sally Becker – painting, pottery and mixed media

Carrie Dietrich – artist

Moises Martinez – oil paintings

Peter Plant – plein air paintings

Erica Woodworth – pottery

Lori Nelson – pottery

Marianne Kingston – crocheted jewelry

Wendy Heiges – handmade jewelry

Anne Finucane – etchings and pastels

Laurie McKelvie – pastels

Debbie Westmoreland – fiberwork

Arts Council table

Bert Danielson – photography

Larry Brogan – photography

Ciji Lo’Ren – leather purses

Dave Laskowski – black and white photography

Caroline Laskowski   fiber artist, beaded bags

Food by Sherry Freeman at Ragged Edge.

 

From Summer to Fall …

Posted on: September 1st, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

There’s been a crispness to the mornings recently, signaling the transition from summer to fall. Fall is my favorite time of year. I often bound forward into the autumn without looking back. However, this year seems a bit harder — How do you leave behind such a wonderful summer? ACAC Education Coordinator Wendy Heiges orchestrated a phenomenal summer of creative camps for our community. With all of the offerings, ACAC received glowing evaluations and cheers for wonderful teachers and projects. We’re so grateful for the treasures created and shared with the ACAC by our community of teachers and students. ACAC hosted 35 camps this summer for students ranging in ages from 3 to 15. Offerings included work with clay, paint, textiles, performing arts and culinary arts.

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The pace in the halls of the Education Center will change with the seasons, of course. The mornings might be a bit quieter with children in school rather than cooking in our kitchen and dancing in the studio, but there’s plenty in store at ACAC for the fall, too. If your kids are back at school and you have some free time during the day, or if you need a break in the evening, you may want to check out a painting class. Can’t commit to a class over several weeks? Drop in for yoga on a Friday morning, join us for a paint and wine night, or register for the upcoming culinary event featuring Food 101’s Chef, Jennifer Williams, the local produce of 5 Points Market, RelishThis, Wine pairings by Caryl Schmitz and dessert by Beeman’s Bakery. This farm-to-table class and celebration, scheduled for October 8 from 6-8 p.m., is sure to be a deliciously fun evening, and it’s just one of many special events ACAC has planned for the fall.  Call 334-5006 or keep checking the web site for more information.

And of course, the halls will be bustling after 3 pm with plenty of after-school opportunities for our younger students. There’s never a shortage of creative activities to engage the kids after school. Click here for a list of after-school offerings.

As we transition from summer to fall, we thank you for your support and participation in the community treasure that is the Adams County Arts Council.

Onward!

Artist Spotlight: Sally Becker

Posted on: April 23rd, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

sally beckerWhile exploring the gully and stream behind her childhood home at the age of five, Sally Becker found clay. Over 50 years later, her Iron Blue Gully Studio sits above that very clay deposit. The iron-rich, bluish clay is a reminder of her first experiences with nature and art, inspiring her work, along with the memories, landscapes and history of her childhood home.

Sally’s mother was not a professional artist, but believed in the importance of art, and shared that belief with her children. Sally took art classes outside of school, and developed the philosophy that art is good for everyone from an early age. Later, she took many courses in clay, as well as drawing, painting and photography, while working toward her BFA at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She went on for a Masters in Education from Penn State, which she credits with improving her effectiveness as a teacher. An elementary and high school art teacher for 40 years, Sally describes herself as the jack of many trades, working in a variety of media.

Sally retired from teaching two years ago, which has opened up opportunities to work in her studio. Ten years ago, she began exploring Encaustic painting, a medium of hot wax and pigment, which originated in ancient Rome. She was able to study this medium with Michael Campbell at Shippensburg University.

Sarah_M_Becker_Memory_Bank_Barn_frontThere’s a lot of clay in her studio, too, but she often mixes media: clay sculptures often have images carved into them, or she will draw with colored slips. She also enjoys drawing with pastels, ink, pencil and graphite. “When I retired, I thought I would start this studio for the fun of it,” Sally says. “But I’m beginning to think there’s more. I am continually drawn to what’s around me where I grew up, landscapes, memories, animals, historical aspects of the farm. I want my family to see these things and remember from my point of view. I want to find a way to get people to think; to make them stop and look.”

fish plateIt makes sense that this urge to inspire people to notice the beauty around them is still with her after 40 years of teaching. Fortunately for our community, Sally continues to share her inspiration and skill teaching classes at the Adams County Arts Council. This session, she is teaching Beginning Drawing and Introduction to Soft Pastels. This summer, she will offer two camps: Turn Songs into Paintings, for ages 8-10 from June 8-12, and 3D Architectural and Figurative Sculpture, for ages 11-14 from June 22-26. Her work can also be seen at numerous ACAC Exhibits and Instructors’ Shows throughout the year… including clay pieces inspired by a 5-year old’s delightful discovery.

 

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Fight Cabin Fever with the ACAC

Posted on: January 5th, 2015 by Karen Hendricks

Cold January days are here, but the arts council had two fantastic events this weekend that can help you combat “cabin fever:”

Have movie moxie? Let your trivia skills shine at our Jan 9 Trivia Contest!

Have movie moxie? Let your trivia skills shine at our Jan 9 Trivia Contest!

The Pike Restaurant, 985 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg, will offer a special Trivia Contest on Friday, January 9, from 6-8 p.m. to benefit the Adams County Arts Council.  Draft a team of up to eight players or join a team that evening and test your general knowledge of subjects like pop culture, sports, history, movies, geography, music and literature.  Cost to play is a $10 donation per person to the Arts Council. Each member of the winning team receives a $20 gift card from The Pike. For more information about the trivia contest or to reserve a table, contact the Pike at 717 334-9227.  For more information about Arts Council classes, programs or membership, contact 717-334-5006aa@adamsarts.org, or visit adamsarts.org.

It Happened One Summer by Dianne Lorden

It Happened One Summer by Dianne Lorden

Eight accomplished artists, members of the Gettysburg or Susquehanna Valley Plein Air Painters groups, will be coming in out of the cold for a Plein Air Paint-In at the Center on Saturday, January 10. From 10 a.m. to 12 noon, you’re invited to see how these artists approach a plein air-type painting and watch as different interpretations of the same bouquet or still life emerge.  The paintings, which may be purchased either framed or unframed, will go on sale from noon to 2 p.m.

Enjoy hot beef vegetable, carrot ginger or crab soup (eat-in or take-out) served up by Arts Council members. You may also choose to purchase soup in hand-carved stoneware bowls by potter Lori Nelson.

There is no admission charge for the event. The artists, all of whom are donating their sales to the Arts Council, include event organizer Barb Ebaugh, Cortez Lawrence, Paul J. Gallo, Claire Beadon Carnell, Larry Lerew, James Bricker, Kim Stone and Dianne Lorden.

Snow date for the Paint-In is Saturday, January 24.

‘Tis the Season for our Holiday Show & Sale

Posted on: November 20th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Article by Elle Lamboy, ACAC Marketing & Development Committee

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The chewy bite of an iced sugar cookie. Red cups at Starbucks. The undeniable scent of pine.  Carols singing on the radio while bells ring in the street. Quality time with food, family and friends.

These festive traditions ignite a certain kind of magic, often juxtaposed by a more stressful reality of holiday shopping.

Fortunately, the Adams County Arts Council’s (ACAC) annual Holiday Show and Sale transforms the frantic buzzkill of holiday shopping into an enjoyable art.

The Show & Sale features about 50 member artists who will have the rare opportunity to “showcase a collection of their work as opposed to just one piece,” says Wendy Heiges, Program Director at the ACAC. “It gives local artists a platform to sell and exhibit their work that they wouldn’t have otherwise.”

This year promises a wonderfully eclectic collection with something creative for everyone on your shopping list—including photography, pottery, stationary, hand-painted ornaments, centerpieces, textiles, jewelry and so much more. A full list of participating artists can be found here.

singingThe Holiday Show & Sale will officially kick off on First Friday, December 5, from 5:00 p.m. -7:30 p.m. This festive and fun reception will feature holiday confections, music from Pomona’s Trio (left, featuring ACAC Board Member Lisa Cadigan on vocals, ACAC culinary instructor Marc Jalbert on guitar, and Gettysburg College professor Bret Crawford on saxophone), carols from the Gettysburg Children’s Choir High School Ensemble, and the opportunity to get first dibs on hand-crafted, local gifts.

Your patronage not only supports local artists in the community; it also helps the ACAC, which will receive a 40% commission for all gifts and artwork purchased.

To get a head start on your holiday shopping, the ACAC will be open for “sneak previews” of the show beginning Tuesday, November 25.  Please visit our website to view our extended holiday hours and schedule or give us a call. For your convenience, the Show & Sale is featured in the reception hall this year which is located just left of the entrance to the Center.

The ACAC’s  annual Holiday Show and Sale channels all that is wonderful about the holidays—the joy of giving, the awakening of the senses and the importance of giving back to our community—leaving the crowds and chaos behind!

You’ll be pleasantly surprised at all we have in store, and may even find your inner artist in the process.

Stay tuned to our blog for updates throughout the sale, including special demos from participating artists!

Questions?  Call (717) 334-5006.

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Adventures in Abstract Art

Posted on: July 22nd, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Robyn Warren - DaveLisa VinoOpportunities for adventure are endless with abstract art.  Whether you claim to “like it” or not, abstract art invites an audience to participate in the creative process.  Because the pieces often do not represent identifiable objects, viewers are taken on an adventure of the senses, drawing on individual experiences and emotions: Does that shade of purple evoke the soft color and smell of flowers in your grandmother’s garden?  Do those undulating blues remind you of a trip to the beach with a long-lost love, making you melancholy? Or do they remind you of a vacation you took last week with a new love, evoking a sensation of bursting happiness?  Whatever you are feeling, the person standing next to you may be simultaneously on a different, but equally relevant emotional adventure.

This phenomenon only allows the adventure to continue.  Once we have processed our own feelings about a piece, we can discuss our impressions and feelings with a friend… or a stranger.  Will you bond over the experience of the piece with the person next to you, or will you engage in a debate, so moved are you by the feelings that no other interpretation seems possible?

Continuing the adventure still, we can imagine the motives of the artists who created the pieces.  Is Arlyn Pettingell’s “Night Ocean” a peaceful sea or a harrowing one? Is there a storm threatening a lovely sky, or are the soft yellows and pinks glimmers of the calm that follows the storm?Pettingell

If you would like to find out, join us for the ACAC’s Abstract Show adventure, which peaks on Friday, August 1 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. with a First Friday reception at the Adams County Arts Council’s Education Center, 125 South Washington Street, Gettysburg, PA, and will continue throughout the month of August.  The show offers a diverse range of style and subject matter in a variety of media, including paintings, photography, sculpture, and mixed media.  Artists will be in attendance at the reception to discuss their work, and all pieces are for sale.

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Three Cheers for A-B-C

Posted on: May 27th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

thankyouAPPLAUSE ALL AROUND
A huge “thank you” to all who contributed to our Arts Benefit Children (ABC) Online Fundraiser  May 20-22.  We did it together!  We didn’t even have to promise you Christmas wrapping paper or junk food – all we did was ask, and you answered. Thanks to your thoughtful generosity, we collected $2,763 in 48-hours to be used for camp and class scholarships.  A majority of our donations were received in $10 and $20 increments, proving that our small actions do indeed carry great impact.  If you missed out on this particular online event, you can always make an online donation to the Adams County Arts Council and share our sponsorship page with your friends.  No amount is too small.

MORE GOOD NEWS
Prior to the ABC fundraiser, ACAC staff also reached out to Adams/Hanover social clubs for scholarship assistance; an effort that resulted in $3,470.  Thanks to both of these efforts, the summer will be brighter for many children.

Ella - Eric Carle Collage CampCHECK OUT OUR CAMPS!
Summer is right around the corner, and ACAC’s camp schedule promises something for everyone.  From preschoolers to teens, the variety of offerings include pottery, sculpture, painting, music, drama, dance, cooking, photography, sewing, weaving, comic book art, collage, mixed media and more. If you haven’t checked out the summer camp offerings yet, click here.  Click on the camp of your choice to register online today! Camps are filling up fast.

Do you need financial assistance?
Fill out this simple form (click here for Spanish) to determine whether you qualify for a scholarship.  Children who qualify for the school lunch program are eligible for scholarships.

The Adams County Arts Education Center is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with friendly staff available to answer your questions, and art on the walls for you to explore.  If you have questions, would like to become a member, or would like more information about summer camps, call (717) 334-5006 or stop in for a visit.

TODAY’S THE DAY!

Posted on: May 20th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

 

I am a believer that all of our choices – big and small – have an impact beyond our wildest imaginings.  A kind word you share today can change the tenor of a stranger’s day; holding a door open for someone can restore his faith in humanity, even if only for a moment. Grocery shopping at 9 a.m. instead of 10 a.m. can be the difference between bumping into an old friend or getting the last of the fresh strawberries. Each tiny decision (and there are thousands of them we make each day) has the potential for a ripple effect into the future.

When I was in high school, my dad took me on a road trip to tour colleges.  I was pretty sure I wanted to go to the University of Maryland at College Park – it was my dad’s alma mater, and the charm of the “south” with its beautiful campuses appealed to me (I am from NJ, so Maryland is “south”).  From College Park, we headed further south to check out the University of Richmond and the University of Virginia.  Our plan was to head home from Charlottesville, but when we found ourselves on a two-lane highway in the lovely rolling hills of Virginia, we realized we had missed an exit or made a wrong turn somewhere. Looking at the map, taking I-81 home made more sense than trying to work our way back to the I-95 corridor, so we re-routed our trip.  When we started seeing signs for James Madison University, we detoured to stretch our legs and check it out. I had never heard of JMU, and was pleasantly surprised to stumble upon the beautiful campus and talk to some folks in the theatre department.  We picked up an application on a whim and continued home.

I applied to three of the four schools we visited that weekend, including JMU, but I was still fairly set on going to College Park. However, when the acceptance letter came from JMU, my trajectory changed in a split second. I am not sure why.  Maybe the pretty bluestone buildings appealed to my aesthetic sensibilities.  Maybe it was the appeal of a theatre department that boasted several student-produced productions each year.  Whatever it was, I decided to go to JMU instead of U of MD.  My life changed because my dad and I turned left when we were supposed to turn right. (Side note: I met my husband at JMU. There are also two children who exist in the world because my dad and I got lost.)

We aren’t always conscious of the impact small choices make in our lives or the lives of others, but there are times when we have an opportunity to make those choices knowingly.

Today is a day like that.

Today, you have an opportunity to click a few buttons and change lives.  Today you can share this post with your friends and family and donate a small amount towards an art-scholarship for a child.  The children who receive these scholarships would not otherwise be able to participate in the summer camps and classes offered by the Adams County Arts Council.

Where would that dollar, or five dollars, or ten dollars burning a hole in your pocket go if you didn’t send it to ACAC?  Maybe it would go toward an extra cup of coffee late in the afternoon, which would in turn, keep you up at night and make you grumpy tomorrow and more likely to yell at your kids.  Maybe it would go towards a pack of gum that somehow ends up chewed and stuck to the rug in your car.

OR…

You can send it the Adams County Arts Council, and know that your pocket change can make our community better by strengthening and enriching its youngest citizens.  Your few dollars and clicks could be the turning point that determines where a child in our community decides to go to college later.  It could be the miniscule thing that makes it possible for the next Ansel Adams or Georgia O’Keefe to discover his or her talent.  At the very least it could be the opportunity for two siblings to find something in common that they like to do together, building family connections.  Your pocket change has infinite possibility today.

How can you get involved?  It’s as easy as A-B-C:

A.  Click here: http://adamsarts.org/sponsorship
Donate $10.  Don’t have $10 to spare?  Donate $5. Or $1.  Every dollar counts – a click and a dollar or two makes a difference with unlimited potential.

B.  Share this story with your friends on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest or by email, and encourage them to play along and donate, too.

C.  Watch our progress on the blog and social media over the next 48 hours as we strive to meet our goal of $4,800 in 48 hours.  We’re hoping to reach 480 people who will donate $10 each.

“Sometimes the little opportunities that fly at us each day can have the biggest impact.” –Danny Wallace


 

 

Meet Mira and Avery

Posted on: May 16th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Regardless of whether one child is the next Van Gogh or whether she just likes to draw stick people, offering children artistic opportunities serves two purposes:

  1. A child is given the opportunity to find a medium for self-expression.
  2. A child is exposed to creative ways people can connect with each other.

The result is people who practice the arts, and people who appreciate them.

Mira's birdhouse from "Dirty Hands Pottery," summer 2013

Mira’s birdhouse from “Dirty Hands Pottery,” summer 2013

Mira is seven, and she loves art.  She is also very good at it.  Last year, thanks to a scholarship awarded through the Adams County Arts Council, she and her brother Avery participated in Jack Handshaw’s “Dirty Hands Pottery” camp and Sara Little’s “Magic Art Time Machine” camp.  Their mother Heidi expressed her gratitude, as she would not have been able to send both kids to camp without the scholarship, which provided a unique opportunity for the siblings to participate in an activity together.  Upon completion of the “Magic Art Time Machine” camp, Sara Little, having seen something promising in Mira’s work, offered Mira private lessons. Mira also won a coloring contest at school and an award for a painted Christmas ornament through the Hanover Area Arts Guild.  Keeping budding artists like Mira involved in art is important.

Avery learns about Edvard Monk's "The Scream" in Sara Little's camp, summer 2013

Avery learns about Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” in Sara Little’s “Magic Art Time Machine” camp, summer 2013

Avery is pretty good at art, too, but more importantly, he loved camp. Heidi confides that Avery usually wouldn’t choose art as “his thing,” but the camps provided exposure to activities he had never tried before, and he enthusiastically produced some impressive work.  He learned about artists like Edvard Munch and his famous painting, “The Scream;” he made a birdhouse; he and his sister shared their versions of the same subjects, a flower and the tree of life – each reflecting a unique interpretation.  Keeping art-enthusiasts like Avery excited about art is also important.

Avery's flower

Avery’s flower

As human beings, we accomplish nothing without creativity.  Whether is it picking out something to wear in the morning, or assessing the quality of your morning coffee by the perfect tint, determined by just the right amount of creamer; whether it is how you will approach a difficult conversation, or how you will let a loved one know you are thinking of her on her birthday; whether it is what you will cook for dinner, or the restaurant you choose if you don’t want to cook – every decision requires a creative impulse.  Our ability to make decisions beneficial to ourselves and to the people around us is largely dependent on our experiences.  Offering a variety of creative experiences to young people promises a future generation with tools to build a rich quality of life.

Mira's flower

Mira’s flower

Beginning May 20 through the 22nd, you will have the opportunity to help children in our community experience not only a rich summer, but also plant the seeds for future creative impulses.

What is your creative impulse telling you to do right now?  I bet it’s telling you to share this post with your friends – go ahead and swirl your mouse with a flourish to the “share” button.  Mark your calendar for our online event May 20-22 (will you draw a star or a heart on the calendar square?).  We are hoping to raise $4,800 in 48 hours for kids like Mira and Avery.  We hope you’ll join the celebration.

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Once upon a time…

Posted on: May 7th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Arts Benefit Children - An Online Event - May 20-22Once upon a time, there was a middle-aged woman.  Every Monday, she woke up, made coffee, woke her children, made breakfast, nagged at them to brush their teeth and put on their shoes, and then drove them to school to start their day.  She continued on to her workplace, where she usually spent the first ten to fifteen minutes of her day checking email and perusing Facebook; a comforting routine to ease herself from the role of mother to the role of employee, ready to tackle the tasks on her to-do list.

One day, as she sat at her computer, a beautiful, brightly colored-image danced across her Facebook newsfeed.  “Arts Benefit Children!” it said.  “Well, of course the arts benefit children,” she thought to herself, and so she clicked. Here is what she read:

Postcard-web“SAVE THE DATE!  On May 20-22, you will have an opportunity to help the Adams County Arts Council raise $4,800 in 48 hours!  We are harnessing the power of the internet to reach out to thousands of people, who can change the lives of children and make the world a better place with just the click of a button!”

“Hmmm…I’m a little skeptical,” she thought to herself.  But she read on.  It turned out that an old friend of hers was involved in the fundraiser, and had posted the colorful image.  She clicked the “donate” button, sent in ten dollars, and then shared the link on her Facebook page, in an attempt to reconnect with her friend.  Her donation surprisingly brought on the sense that she had already accomplished something helpful and important that day, and it was only 8:45 a.m.  “Huh,” she thought. “Simple mouse-clicks do have the capability of affecting people.  But why would anyone want to donate to an organization with which they may not have a personal connection?”

The answer came to her surprisingly quickly.  She suddenly remembered a painting class she took as a third grader.  She had just moved to a new city and school where she hadn’t yet made friends.  She was lonely and worried she would never adjust.  At the beginning of the class, she couldn’t think of anything to paint, so she decided she would just choose colors to paint “lonely.”  The result was a beautiful painting in blues and greens, and her teacher shared it with the rest of the class.  At the end of class, another student approached her and told her how much she liked the painting.  The girl was still her friend thirty years later.  Art had changed her life in that moment.

A man in another state, who knew the woman in college, saw the brightly colored image pop up in his newsfeed.  Seeing her name attached to the post unexpectedly flooded him with college memories. He recalled a meeting with his freshman advisor, who told him he was required to take an art class.  “I don’t want to take an art class,” he had thought at the time. “I’m a mathematician, not an artist.”  But his advisor explained that the art class was a requirement for graduation.  So he decided on an acting class.  He realized he had been using principles from the class every day in his classroom as a math teacher. Thanks to that acting class, he was comfortable in front of a crowd and better able to read the faces of his students.  Not to mention, he met his wife in that acting class.

He called his wife, and nostalgically recounted the memory of their meeting place, telling her about the post on Facebook.  “I am sharing it with you right now,” he said.  “You should share it with your artsy-friends and donate a dollar or two.”  She laughed, because she and her husband often playfully debated the differences in their educations; his was much more math and science-based, while she had been a music major with a minor in English.  They were both highly intelligent people, and both were teachers now, touching the lives of future generations with skills polished at least partially, if not entirely, by their experiences with art.

She shared the Facebook post, too, and donated five dollars.  As she read the stories across shared posts, she was deeply touched.  She had been the recipient of a music scholarship in the fourth grade that allowed her to take violin lessons.  Her family could not afford the instrument rental without that scholarship, and if she had not taken those lessons, she would never have tapped into the musical part of herself that filled her heart and life so significantly.  She realized the scholarship was the reason she taught elementary orchestra now.  She tweeted and emailed the fundraiser information to all of her colleagues.

This is how it works. 

Every day, we connect with people, and the common source of our human connection is creativity.   Whether it is telling a joke, watching a movie, writing a business memo, or writing a novel, the source of human connection requires a creative thought and a medium through which it can be expressed.

In the coming weeks, we will share real stories of kids who have benefitted from scholarships. You can be part of giving them the tools to creatively contribute to their relationships, careers and to the quality of life in our communities.

Do you have an art story?  Will you share it, along with this invitation to help others write theirs?

If just 480 people donate $10 each, we can offer scholarships to more than thirty disadvantaged young people.  We can unleash the creative potential in children who may not otherwise be able to tap into such a venue.

Don’t have $10 to spare?  Donate just $5.  Or $1.  Every dollar counts – a click and a dollar or two makes a difference with unlimited potential connections

How can you get involved?  It’s as easy as A-B-C:

A. Visit our donation page between May 20 and 22nd
http://adamsarts.org/sponsorship
Donate a dollar.  Or $5.  Or $10.  Or more, if you feel so inspired.  But know that every dollar counts.

B. Share this story with your friends, and encourage them to play along and donate, too.

C. Come back to the blog to hear stories about past scholarship recipients who have enjoyed classes and camps here, and track our progress.

We look forward to hearing from you soon!

lisaandkaren

 

 

 

Lisa Cadigan is a director on the Adams County Arts Council’s board and the chair of ACAC’s Marketing & Development Committee. She is also the sole proprietor of Cadigan Creative, where she offers graphic design and marketing services.  You can  find out more about Lisa on the Cadigan Creative website, and see samples of her writing on her blog, Daily Presents.

Karen Hendricks is a volunteer on the Adams County Arts Council’s marketing and development committee and the owner/president of Hendricks Communications, LLC.  Karen demonstrates a love of writing and communicating in all she does; it’s the common thread linking all of her current and past experiences.  Her communications firm provides compelling public relations and marketing services to a select but varied group of clients. You can find out more about Karen on the Hendricks Communications website and see additional samples of her writing on her blog, Off the Merry-Go-Round.

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