Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County, PA

Posts Tagged ‘stories’

It’s HERE! Arts Benefit Children (ABC) 50/50
April 26-28

Posted on: April 25th, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

In preparation for our exciting online event, ABC 50/50, we have spent the past few weeks introducing you to prominent members of our community who have one thing in common: they all recognize the importance of creative thinking and aesthetic expression in connecting us to each other in community, which consequently maximizes our quality of life as human beings.

Ed W Clark GETT - March 2014

Ed Clark

In our first article, you met Ed Clark, Superintendent of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site, who explains the importance of using the artistic and aesthetic aspects of our town to teach its rich history to generation after generation. An understanding of history informs our treatment of others, our politics and our plans for the future both as a local community and as a united world. The artistic monuments, books, paintings, plays, and museums are just a few examples of how that history has been shared in Gettysburg with people from all over the world.

Marty Qually

Marty Qually

Next we introduced you to Adams County Commissioner Marty Qually, who creatively thinks of our county as “a canvas, and there are 100,000 people with paintbrushes.” He says, “My job is to help all of them paint this county into something better than it was.” Commissioner Qually reminds us that to do a good job at whatever your career may be, one should find a creative “niche” from which to do it.

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Marc Jalbert

We introduced you to baker and entrepreneur Marc Jalbert, a successful business owner in the Gettysburg area for over 20 years, who began his career with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree in painting from the University of Southern Maine. Jalbert’s arts education still informs decisions he makes with his business every day, and we as a community reap the benefits when we visit his beautiful bakery and sample the artisan breads and pastries he offers in service.

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Janet Riggs

In a political climate where liberal arts degrees are often discounted, Gettysburg College President Janet Riggs recently offered her thoughts in an editorial in the Miami Herald: “Politicians are doing a disservice to us all by blasting the liberal arts. Residential liberal arts colleges prepare students not only for professional success, but also for lives of civic impact. Our world needs more people — not fewer — with this kind of preparation.” She goes on to emphasize that an education that focuses on creative thinking in a variety of disciplines produces citizens who “go on to have rich and diverse careers in human services, marketing, business, research, human resources, consulting, and education,” noting that her own liberal arts education and major in psychology eventually landed her a position as the president of a prestigious college.

I wish we could profile 100 more people in this series – We are so blessed to live among a diversely creative group of people in this community, each of whom makes a lasting contribution to the tapestry of our lives. I know I am not alone in my desire to continue improving upon our quality of life while preparing the next generation of creative thinkers and community leaders. We all have an opportunity right now to help make that happen.

Join us April 26 through the 28th and make your donation to the ABC 50/50 campaign.

Why “50/50”?

We are asking for $50 donations over a 50-hour period, from Tuesday April 26 at 8 a.m. through Thursday, April 28 at 8 a.m. It takes three $50 donations to send a child to a summer arts camp. Will you help us send kids to camp and classes this year?

Can’t spare $50? We will be so grateful if you can make a $50 donation (or more) toward this campaign; however, if $50 seems too steep, every $0.50 counts, too. Remember the success of our 2014 campaign? We were able to send 20 kids to camp with your $1 to $10 donations. It all counts, so make your donation today!

How can I help?
It’s as easy as A-B-C:

ABC-LOGO-webA. Visit adamsarts.org/sponsorship on April 26 and make your online donation.

B. Share, email and tweet this information to all of your contacts on social media. Your sharing is essential to the success of this campaign.

C. Be sure to watch (and share) our progress online! How many $50 donations can we receive in 50 hours? We will keep you posted on the sponsorship page and on Facebook and Twitter throughout the event.

This event was made possible by the volunteer efforts of the Adams County Arts Council’s Marketing and Development Committee:
Lisa Cadigan, Chair
Anne Cherry
Carol Cook
Joyce Ettenger
Chris Glatfelter (executive director, ACAC)
Nanette Hatzes
Wendy Heiges
Karen Hendricks
Elle Lamboy
Polly Patrono-Carlson

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Artist Spotlight: Sally Becker

Posted on: April 23rd, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

sally beckerWhile exploring the gully and stream behind her childhood home at the age of five, Sally Becker found clay. Over 50 years later, her Iron Blue Gully Studio sits above that very clay deposit. The iron-rich, bluish clay is a reminder of her first experiences with nature and art, inspiring her work, along with the memories, landscapes and history of her childhood home.

Sally’s mother was not a professional artist, but believed in the importance of art, and shared that belief with her children. Sally took art classes outside of school, and developed the philosophy that art is good for everyone from an early age. Later, she took many courses in clay, as well as drawing, painting and photography, while working toward her BFA at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She went on for a Masters in Education from Penn State, which she credits with improving her effectiveness as a teacher. An elementary and high school art teacher for 40 years, Sally describes herself as the jack of many trades, working in a variety of media.

Sally retired from teaching two years ago, which has opened up opportunities to work in her studio. Ten years ago, she began exploring Encaustic painting, a medium of hot wax and pigment, which originated in ancient Rome. She was able to study this medium with Michael Campbell at Shippensburg University.

Sarah_M_Becker_Memory_Bank_Barn_frontThere’s a lot of clay in her studio, too, but she often mixes media: clay sculptures often have images carved into them, or she will draw with colored slips. She also enjoys drawing with pastels, ink, pencil and graphite. “When I retired, I thought I would start this studio for the fun of it,” Sally says. “But I’m beginning to think there’s more. I am continually drawn to what’s around me where I grew up, landscapes, memories, animals, historical aspects of the farm. I want my family to see these things and remember from my point of view. I want to find a way to get people to think; to make them stop and look.”

fish plateIt makes sense that this urge to inspire people to notice the beauty around them is still with her after 40 years of teaching. Fortunately for our community, Sally continues to share her inspiration and skill teaching classes at the Adams County Arts Council. This session, she is teaching Beginning Drawing and Introduction to Soft Pastels. This summer, she will offer two camps: Turn Songs into Paintings, for ages 8-10 from June 8-12, and 3D Architectural and Figurative Sculpture, for ages 11-14 from June 22-26. Her work can also be seen at numerous ACAC Exhibits and Instructors’ Shows throughout the year… including clay pieces inspired by a 5-year old’s delightful discovery.

 

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Artist Spotlight: Carol Herren Foerster

Posted on: June 23rd, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

CarolAdams County Arts Council member Carol Herren Foerster has been sharing her drawings in Adams County for more than 25 years, but she recently recommitted herself to “really doing her art.”

Unexpected family obligations that arose earlier in her career made it impossible for Carol to finish her teaching certification, despite finishing a Bachelor’s degree in art.  Later, a work-related injury left her legally disabled with Radial Tunnel Syndrome in her right arm.  Carol says it’s no coincidence that drawing is the one activity that doesn’t aggravate the disorder.  The fine detail of her work is further evidence that drawing is what she is called to do.

Carol’s first priority has always been her family. Though her two children and four step-children are now grown, her house still often bustles with the sounds of little people – her grandchildren – for whom she cares while their parents are working.  As a younger mom, she worked odd jobs here and there, squeezing in time to draw when she could.  Since her own children are now grown, she is enjoying the freedom to pursue her drawing more seriously, particularly since the youngest grandchild is out of diapers.

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This piece will be on display as part of the Art of the State Show at the State Museum of Harrisburg until September 2014.

She also credits a sense of artistic liberation to Facebook and social media.  Since posting her work on Facebook, the overwhelmingly positive responses have allowed her to let go of self-imposed angst and inhibition surrounding her abilities as an artist. Her confidence has snowballed over the past few years, during which she has not only improved her skills, but she has also entered more shows and contests, won a few awards, and most recently, she received a letter from Pennsylvania Senator Richard Alloway, III congratulating her on a spot in the Art of the State Show at the State Museum of Pennsylvania in Harrisburg, which began Saturday, June 22 and continues through September. She also has work showing at the Salmagundi Club in New York City this summer. Because she practices her art and submits her work without expectation or worry, the notifications of awards and acceptances like these feel like happy surprises.

When asked about her plans for the future, Carol says, “I’m no longer taking commissions. I just draw what I want.” An earlier plan to draw a series of women’s portraits evolved into a beautiful, eclectic collection of subjects that were on display at the ACAC Education Center last May.  She looks forward to another show at ACAC in April of 2015.  To prepare for that show and other upcoming events, Carol says she will just “go with the flow and follow inspiration.”  It’s a tactic that has been serving her well so far.

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This piece will be featured for the summer at the Salmagundi Club, 47 Fifth Ave., New York NY.

Carol has a website, but you can see her most up-to-date work on her Facebook page.

Contact her through Facebook or at carolsartsite@gmail.com to inquire about purchasing her drawings.

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The fine detail of Carol’s work makes it clear that drawing is what she is called to do.

Would you like to nominate yourself or another ACAC member for an Artist Spotlight article on this blog?
Email Lisa Cadigan or Karen Hendricks with your ideas for a great art story.

Three Cheers for A-B-C

Posted on: May 27th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

thankyouAPPLAUSE ALL AROUND
A huge “thank you” to all who contributed to our Arts Benefit Children (ABC) Online Fundraiser  May 20-22.  We did it together!  We didn’t even have to promise you Christmas wrapping paper or junk food – all we did was ask, and you answered. Thanks to your thoughtful generosity, we collected $2,763 in 48-hours to be used for camp and class scholarships.  A majority of our donations were received in $10 and $20 increments, proving that our small actions do indeed carry great impact.  If you missed out on this particular online event, you can always make an online donation to the Adams County Arts Council and share our sponsorship page with your friends.  No amount is too small.

MORE GOOD NEWS
Prior to the ABC fundraiser, ACAC staff also reached out to Adams/Hanover social clubs for scholarship assistance; an effort that resulted in $3,470.  Thanks to both of these efforts, the summer will be brighter for many children.

Ella - Eric Carle Collage CampCHECK OUT OUR CAMPS!
Summer is right around the corner, and ACAC’s camp schedule promises something for everyone.  From preschoolers to teens, the variety of offerings include pottery, sculpture, painting, music, drama, dance, cooking, photography, sewing, weaving, comic book art, collage, mixed media and more. If you haven’t checked out the summer camp offerings yet, click here.  Click on the camp of your choice to register online today! Camps are filling up fast.

Do you need financial assistance?
Fill out this simple form (click here for Spanish) to determine whether you qualify for a scholarship.  Children who qualify for the school lunch program are eligible for scholarships.

The Adams County Arts Education Center is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with friendly staff available to answer your questions, and art on the walls for you to explore.  If you have questions, would like to become a member, or would like more information about summer camps, call (717) 334-5006 or stop in for a visit.

TODAY’S THE DAY!

Posted on: May 20th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

 

I am a believer that all of our choices – big and small – have an impact beyond our wildest imaginings.  A kind word you share today can change the tenor of a stranger’s day; holding a door open for someone can restore his faith in humanity, even if only for a moment. Grocery shopping at 9 a.m. instead of 10 a.m. can be the difference between bumping into an old friend or getting the last of the fresh strawberries. Each tiny decision (and there are thousands of them we make each day) has the potential for a ripple effect into the future.

When I was in high school, my dad took me on a road trip to tour colleges.  I was pretty sure I wanted to go to the University of Maryland at College Park – it was my dad’s alma mater, and the charm of the “south” with its beautiful campuses appealed to me (I am from NJ, so Maryland is “south”).  From College Park, we headed further south to check out the University of Richmond and the University of Virginia.  Our plan was to head home from Charlottesville, but when we found ourselves on a two-lane highway in the lovely rolling hills of Virginia, we realized we had missed an exit or made a wrong turn somewhere. Looking at the map, taking I-81 home made more sense than trying to work our way back to the I-95 corridor, so we re-routed our trip.  When we started seeing signs for James Madison University, we detoured to stretch our legs and check it out. I had never heard of JMU, and was pleasantly surprised to stumble upon the beautiful campus and talk to some folks in the theatre department.  We picked up an application on a whim and continued home.

I applied to three of the four schools we visited that weekend, including JMU, but I was still fairly set on going to College Park. However, when the acceptance letter came from JMU, my trajectory changed in a split second. I am not sure why.  Maybe the pretty bluestone buildings appealed to my aesthetic sensibilities.  Maybe it was the appeal of a theatre department that boasted several student-produced productions each year.  Whatever it was, I decided to go to JMU instead of U of MD.  My life changed because my dad and I turned left when we were supposed to turn right. (Side note: I met my husband at JMU. There are also two children who exist in the world because my dad and I got lost.)

We aren’t always conscious of the impact small choices make in our lives or the lives of others, but there are times when we have an opportunity to make those choices knowingly.

Today is a day like that.

Today, you have an opportunity to click a few buttons and change lives.  Today you can share this post with your friends and family and donate a small amount towards an art-scholarship for a child.  The children who receive these scholarships would not otherwise be able to participate in the summer camps and classes offered by the Adams County Arts Council.

Where would that dollar, or five dollars, or ten dollars burning a hole in your pocket go if you didn’t send it to ACAC?  Maybe it would go toward an extra cup of coffee late in the afternoon, which would in turn, keep you up at night and make you grumpy tomorrow and more likely to yell at your kids.  Maybe it would go towards a pack of gum that somehow ends up chewed and stuck to the rug in your car.

OR…

You can send it the Adams County Arts Council, and know that your pocket change can make our community better by strengthening and enriching its youngest citizens.  Your few dollars and clicks could be the turning point that determines where a child in our community decides to go to college later.  It could be the miniscule thing that makes it possible for the next Ansel Adams or Georgia O’Keefe to discover his or her talent.  At the very least it could be the opportunity for two siblings to find something in common that they like to do together, building family connections.  Your pocket change has infinite possibility today.

How can you get involved?  It’s as easy as A-B-C:

A.  Click here: http://adamsarts.org/sponsorship
Donate $10.  Don’t have $10 to spare?  Donate $5. Or $1.  Every dollar counts – a click and a dollar or two makes a difference with unlimited potential.

B.  Share this story with your friends on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest or by email, and encourage them to play along and donate, too.

C.  Watch our progress on the blog and social media over the next 48 hours as we strive to meet our goal of $4,800 in 48 hours.  We’re hoping to reach 480 people who will donate $10 each.

“Sometimes the little opportunities that fly at us each day can have the biggest impact.” –Danny Wallace


 

 

Welcome to the Adams County Arts Council Blog

Posted on: April 30th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

By Lisa Cadigan and Karen Hendricks

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We are thrilled to introduce the Adams County Arts Council’s newest creative endeavor—this blog!  Here you will find a variety of articles ranging from ACAC event announcements, news, features on local artists, and creative stories to inspire our membership. Come back often to go behind-the-scenes with the ACAC.

Do you have an idea for a story that may interest the ACAC community? 
Submit it to one of our co-curators, board member Lisa Cadigan or marketing committee volunteer Karen Hendricks.

Subscribe to get posts delivered directly to your email account as they are published.  You can also follow the blog through our Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest accounts.

We look forward to sharing stories about The Adams County Arts Council and developing a more interactive relationship with you.  Please “like,” share and comment on the stories that touch you the most.

Creatively yours,

lisaandkaren

 

 

 

 

Lisa Cadigan is a director on the Adams County Arts Council’s board and the chair of ACAC’s Marketing & Development Committee. She is also the sole proprietor of Cadigan Creative, where she offers graphic design and marketing services.  You can  find out more about Lisa on the Cadigan Creative website, and see samples of her writing on her blog, Daily Presents.

Karen Hendricks is a volunteer on the Adams County Arts Council’s marketing and development committee and the owner/president of Hendricks Communications, LLC.  Karen demonstrates a love of writing and communicating in all she does; it’s the common thread linking all of her current and past experiences.  Her communications firm provides compelling public relations and marketing services to a select but varied group of clients. You can find out more about Karen on the Hendricks Communications website and see additional samples of her writing on her blog, Off the Merry-Go-Round.

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