Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County, PA

Posts Tagged ‘summer art camp’

Arts Benefit Children – 2017

Posted on: April 28th, 2017 by Lisa Cadigan

 

Thank you for your generous donations to the 2017 ABC Campaign!

The final results are in! We raised the equivalent of 43 $50 donations! We are grateful to announce that a grand total of $2,135 was donated to enrich the lives of area children. Thanks to your generosity and support, 15 children will be able to attend summer arts camps with scholarships.

Donors for this year’s campaign include:

Anonymous
Mary Jo Bennett
Margy Borock
Tom Bricker
Judie Butterfield
Lisa Cadigan
Dennis Cadigan
Carmen Cordiano
Michael Flaherty
Lana Gowin
Geoff Grant
Jack Handshaw
Rebecca Harris
Janet Hikes
Sharon Hoke
Holahan Studio

Fran Ingram
Gerald Maloney
Eileen Mathias
Holly Purdy
Ladonna Reading
Sacred Lotus Yoga Studio
Dennis Steinauer
Susan Swope
Peggy Talbot
Lawrence Taylor
Susan Thomas
Kimberly Van Deusen
Sylvia Weaver
Mark Wesling
Elizabeth Zaic

 

2016 Camps

Last year, we served 380 campers, and 140 scholarships were awarded. 2016 was also the first year of our Annual Encouragement Awards.  Five campers received this award for their work during a summer arts camp. Your support truly makes a difference in the lives of children in our community.

Enjoy these photos from 2016 Summer Camps:

Photography Camp – Summer 2016

Ballerinas and Bears Camp – Summer 2016

Drawing Camp – Summer 2016

Cooking Camp – Summer 2016

Sewing Camp – Summer 2016

Introducing Wesley Doll: Superintendent of Upper Adams School District

Posted on: April 26th, 2017 by Lisa Cadigan

by Elle Lamboy

As superintendent of Upper Adams School District, Wesley Doll is a busy man. He barely had time for this interview but went out of his way to accommodate our schedule, which is a testament of his support for the Adams County Arts Council’s (ACAC) efforts to provide creative programming to local youth. Finding the time for art is not always easy, or valued, in education. Luckily, there are educators like Wesley Doll, who also goes the extra mile for the students of Upper Adams School District.

While he recognizes that one of the challenges he faces as a district leader is finding the resources to provide valuable artistic experiences, Wesley also understands the invaluable role arts play in the educational process stating, “The visual arts provide outlets for expressing feelings and ideas. The production of visual arts enhances creativity and problem solving, while utilizing components of science to produce a work of art. During the creative process, students sometimes find they are learning about themselves, and in many cases, they learn they are successful at creating a work, and that they are proud to be recognized as the artist.”

Student artwork from the Upper Adams school district

Wesley learned first hand how critical the role of an educator is in introducing art into a student’s life when he met his mentor in the seventh grade. “It was in Mr. Eric Miller’s art class at New Oxford Middle School, where I learned I may have a special interest and talent,” Wesley explains. “Mr. Miller became a mentor throughout my education at New Oxford and later at the University of Maryland, College Park. At Maryland, I started studying architecture and later focused my college studies on education, with a concentration in art. When I can find time today, I still enjoy my experiences with art and architecture as a result of the wonderful experiences I have been afforded throughout my life.”

While the demands of his job inhibit him from practicing his own art as much as he would like, he enjoys watercolor painting and finds inspiration in nature and architecture. He uses his free time to work with his two young daughters when they are inspired to create artwork.

Wesley supports the Adams County Arts Council’s (ACAC) effort to provide enriching programing through our summer camps, stating “The ACAC art summer camps provide opportunities for students to extend their current experiences in the arts. Additionally, the camps also provide people new learning experiences about the arts, while utilizing local talent to help provide creative and individualized opportunities in a comfortable environment.”

We hope you’ll be inspired by Wesley and the other educators in our series, and support the ACAC today. Your donations help to enrich the lives of local children who may not have the opportunity for an artful summer otherwise. Click here to learn more about our ABC campaign and donate now. We can’t succeed without your support. THANK YOU!

 

 

Introducing Donna Harrison: Principal at James Gettys Elementary

Posted on: April 25th, 2017 by Lisa Cadigan

By Lisa Cadigan

I had the pleasure of interviewing Donna Harrison, principal at James Gettys Elementary School in Gettysburg, and I asked her how she thinks studying the arts in school enhances learning.

She had a twinkle in her eye and a warm smile as she recounted tales of children who are able to “shine” when given an opportunity to express themselves creatively, particularly in the annual Fine Arts Night at James Gettys Elementary, which showcases student performances of songs and dance choreography learned in music and physical education classes. She noted similar observations in the music program for older students, “I see kids in orchestra who may struggle academically, but who thrive on an instrument.” Students involved in music and the arts are able to set and meet goals through the practice of creative expression in ways that translate to success in other areas as well.

Artist-in-residence Ellen Ehlenbeck worked with students to create a permanent autobiographical mobile installation in the lobby of James Gettys.

Mrs. Harrison shared stories of artists-in-residence who have spent time at James Gettys, like Ellen Ehlenbeck, whose program last year resulted in an installation of student-produced “self-portrait” mobiles that adorn the school’s lobby, and the National Circus Project (http://www.nationalcircusproject.com/) that visits every other year, teaching students to master a brand new performance skill over the course of just one week. The students love these opportunities, and look forward to them each year.

Art projects in each classroom help students to absorb concepts and express themselves.

But it’s not just visiting artists who are bursting with creativity in the halls of James Gettys. Mrs. Harrison commended an imaginative staff who often incorporate the arts into classroom teaching. The Action Based Learning (ABL) program uses a multi-sensory approach to help kindergartners learn letters and their sounds with whole-body movement. Art projects directly related to science, social studies and reading ensure that new concepts and ideas are being fully absorbed. Many teachers use songs regularly in class to instill good habits with lining up, washing hands, math facts, etc. Mrs. Harrison shared a story of one student who passed his test on the preamble of the Constitution by singing it—it was the only way he could remember all of the words.

Mrs. Harrison’s anecdotal observations are supported by multiple research studies, including the ideas presented in the article cited in our earlier ABC campaign blog post (http://adamsarts.org/support-the-arts-for-our-sake-its-as-easy-as-abc/) referencing Dr. Lois Hetland, professor and graduate coordinator in the art education department at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, and senior research affiliate at Project Zero in the Harvard Graduate School of Education. In that interview, while Dr. Hetland says using art as a “vehicle to teach other academic content” is often “appropriate and useful,” she also warns that this should not be seen as a substitute for arts instruction, which places a unique emphasis on the “Eight Studio Habits of Mind.” Her research on this topic suggests that art instruction impacts students’ abilities to think meta-cognitively, even at early ages. This further reinforces the idea that arts education is key in helping to develop not just a student, but a human being. Dr. Hetland says, “The real product of art education is not the works of art, but the child.” The eight steps include these tangible skills:

  • Developing Craft
  • Engage And Persist
  • Envision
  • Express
  • Observe
  • Reflect
  • Stretch And Explore
  • Understand Art World

My conversation with Mrs. Harrison supported these ideas. We discussed the importance of creative expression and instruction in an academic setting, and how it allows students to set goals and reach their own great expectations in ways that may not always be possible in other areas. “We can’t just focus on test scores. We need to keep the whole child in mind,” says Mrs. Harrison.

You can help a child develop important skills like practicing a craft, engaging and persisting, expression, observation and reflection by making a donation to our ABC campaign. Every three $50 donations sends one child to a summer arts camp.

Thank you for your support!

Donate now!

 

References

“A Look at Lois Hetland’s Eight Studio Habits.” Every Art, Every Child | Studio Habits. Northeastern Illinois University, 2012. Web. 24 Apr. 2017. <http://www.everyarteverychild.org/assessment/studiohabits.html>.

Cadigan, Lisa C. “Support the Arts for OUR Sake: It’s as Easy as ABC.” Adams County Arts Council. Adams County Arts Council, 22 Apr. 2017. Web. 24 Apr. 2017. <http://adamsarts.org/support-the-arts-for-our-sake-its-as-easy-as-abc/>.

Heller, Rafael. “On the Goals and Outcomes of Arts Education: An Interview with Lois Hetland.” Phi Beta Kappan 98.7 (2017): 15-20. Web. 21 Apr. 2017.

 

Introducing Sarah Auld: Art Teacher at Gettysburg Area Middle School

Posted on: April 23rd, 2017 by Lisa Cadigan

by Polly Patrono-Carlson

 

Sarah Auld is everything one would expect from an art teacher. She is positive, creative, and extremely thoughtful. Her room and the various cases around the school—full of student work—show how proud she is of her students and their accomplishments.

A 2016 graduate from Millersville University, Sarah started her new adventure at Gettysburg Area Middle School (GAMS) far from her hometown of Easton. She says the best part of teaching is the unexpected, “There is never a boring day.”

For Miss Auld, the importance of arts education is giving students an opportunity to create, to problem solve, and to feel accomplished. Arts education is not just about the end product, but more importantly, it is about the journey to reach it. In her classes, students have a chance to create from their own vision, learning along the way that there may be more than one way to get there.

Currently, her class is working on creating art using exacto knives. Scary…yes, but the projects so far have been amazing. When tuned in to a mindful process, students have produced animals, everyday household objects and even the Eiffel Tower out of cardboard, using just a knife and a little imagination.

Sarah encourages her students to interpret the word “connection” as they develop their own inspiration for project ideas. Once they create their own vision in their minds, they are given a practical tool to express themselves through their ideas. This process of challenge, creation and accomplishment summarizes the importance of arts education in school.

Sarah knows that with the demands of testing and their many obligations, kids often feel like they have the weight of the world on their shoulders. She hopes that art and her classroom offer students the necessary place to connect, solve problems and create. Art is a haven she is happy to provide for the students at Gettysburg Middle School.

There are many students who shine in the art classroom, and who deserve a place to pursue those interests further outside of school. Like any skill, art requires practice, and the more opportunities we can offer students to explore, create, and problem solve, the better. With this in mind, we hope you will consider a donation to the Adams County Arts Council’s Arts Benefit Children (ABC) campaign, where every three $50 donations sends a child to a summer arts camp. Every dollar counts – thank you for your support!

Marc Jalbert on How to Be an Entrepreneur:
Major in Art

Posted on: April 22nd, 2016 by Lisa Cadigan

by Lisa Cadigan

This spring, we turn to a number of community leaders to explain how the arts intersect with their work. This series leads to the “ABC 50/50” campaign set for April 26-28. Look for exciting details to come regarding Arts Benefit Children (ABC)!

Marc

Marc Jalbert

Today’s article is features Marc Jalbert, entrepreneur baker and owner of the Gettysburg Baking Company, which is nestled in the corner of Lincoln Square in Gettysburg.

Adams County residents as well as visitors from near and far are familiar with the Gettysburg Baking Company, its baker/owner Marc Jalbert, and the beautiful and delicious artisan breads and pastries the bakery offers. (If you’re not – go visit and buy a seeded twist!) Jalbert has been a successful small-business owner in Adams County for twenty years. During that time, various incarnations of his bakery/café have seen success thanks to high quality products, impeccable customer service, and beautifully designed, well-managed spaces.

How did Marc Jalbert come to be such a successful entrepreneur and fixture in the Gettysburg restaurant scene? Was he a business major? Did he study hotel and restaurant management as an undergraduate? These are answers one may expect from a successful restaurateur, but Jalbert actually began his career with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Southern Maine.

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Marc’s famous seeded twists

After teaching art briefly at a private school following graduation, Jalbert realized he “wanted to do his own thing,” so he started freelancing as a graphic designer. Sitting behind a desk all day soon grew tiresome, so he followed his curiosity to learn how to bake – a job that allowed him to be up and about while working with his hands to create an aesthetic and delicious product. “I naively thought baking would be easier than cooking,” Jalbert confesses. But he also feels that his naiveté kept him in the game to keep learning. He took a few classes at King Arthur Flour in Norwich, Vermont after working as a self-taught baker for about six years, and moved to Gettysburg in 1995 with the intentions of establishing a bakery business and storefront.

How did his fine arts degree prepare him for running a business? “Every challenge that comes up can be thought of as a design problem,” says Jalbert. “Whether it’s marketing and designing logos and communications materials, setting up a space that is an efficient and user-friendly place to work and visit, or managing a staff, an artist is trained to look at the whole as well as its parts and how they fit together.” Jalbert had the additional benefit of being raised in an entrepreneurial environment – his dad owned a barbershop in Maine. An avid reader, he continues to read and learn as new challenges arise, but he says he uses his fine arts major every day.

Marc_bakery“Artists are trained to be mindful and pay attention,” says Jalbert. “As an art student, you are trained to stop and look at things – it’s a more open-ended means of problem solving, which may be more suited to ‘jobs of the future.’ Who ever heard of a webmaster 20 years ago?” Rather than education that strictly trains for a task, Jalbert suggests we consider focusing more on education for creative thinking as jobs that didn’t even exist in the not-so-distant past continue to evolve in our society.

If you visit his shop and pay attention, it’s easy to notice the details of the artist in the space, from the warm and welcoming color scheme, to the use of space; from the accessories carefully chosen to display his wares, to the beautiful details in the shape, texture and color of each loaf and pastry. And don’t forget the taste. Everything is delicious.

Marc_stickybunsAs we kick off our Arts Benefit Children (ABC) 50/50 event on April 26 to raise scholarship funds for children to attend arts camps and classes at the ACAC, remember fellow community members like Marc, whose business contributes so much to the quality of life in Adams County. It is largely thanks to art education that Jalbert is able to contribute so much to our community as a small business owner and entrepreneur. Help us continue to foster new generations of creative thinkers and doers by participating in ABC 50/50. Stay tuned for more news on this exciting event.

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Artist Spotlight: Anna (Fetter) Robison

Posted on: March 2nd, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

Anna-fettucine-handsCulinary Arts Instructor Anna (Fetter) Robison Shows How Food Is Art, Appealing to All of our Senses

I first met Anna (Fetter) Robison when she was the head chef at Pomona’s Woodfired Bakery Café (now Fidler & Co. Custom Kitchen) in Biglerville.  From the beginning, her talents in the culinary arts were obvious: the restaurant was always filled with people and delicious smells – the aromas were just a teaser to the tastes that followed. It was also impressive to watch her craft beautiful and tasty dishes while managing a kitchen staff often made up of her siblings. The oldest of six, Anna grew up in Cashtown with a strong sense of family. Watching her run a kitchen, it was obvious she and her brothers and sisters hold each other in high regard and with mutual respect. She runs a tight ship, but acknowledges, “Yelling isn’t good for anyone. Respect is a two-way street.”

Anna left Pomona’s to focus on time with her family, and she approaches parenting in the same no-nonsense, fun-loving, mutually respectful way she runs a kitchen. Mom to a precocious and adorable five-year-old who also loves to cook, once a week Anna encourages her daughter Emily’s creative exploration by allowing “experimental soups” for dinner, which Emily makes and serves to the grown-ups. Anna respectfully tastes whatever is served. After all, if Emily is expected to eat what is in front of her, Anna feels it is important to offer the same respect. That said, Anna admitted with a smirk that when her daughter’s “soups” are too difficult to choke down, she and her husband might creatively distract Emily before cleaning their plates in the sink. Some day they will all laugh about this together.

Cooking adventures with her daughter have inspired many of the children’s classes Anna teaches for the Adams County Arts Council. Earlier this year, she offered a Mommy & Me Frozen-themed cooking class, inspired by the popular movie. This summer, she is excited to offer a Princess Cooking Camp, where students will be introduced to cuisines paired with the appropriate princesses, including dishes like New Orleans-style jambalaya, inspired by Tiana of The Princess and the Frog and a sea-foam smoothie and shell pasta salad, inspired by Ariel of The Little Mermaid.

pasta-dishIn addition to her wonderful work with kids, Anna is also a culinary artist with much to offer adults. Her specialties include fresh pasta and seafood dishes. These evening classes can be a great alternative to a typical night at a restaurant – students enjoy a social evening of learning, interaction and great food. The experience offers food that is not only delicious, it’s also beautiful. Tantalizing smells fill the classroom-kitchen. The culinary arts allow students to experience food with all five senses, making it a uniquely appealing art form.

Anna is thoroughly enjoying her teaching experiences at ACAC, and she aspires to teach full-time some day. A graduate of the Gettysburg High School Tech Prep Culinary Arts program, she had all good things to say about her experience there, and would ultimately love to return as a full-time instructor. In the meantime, you can find her working at Hickory Bridge Farm, a family-style restaurant in Ortanna, and teaching all she can at ACAC.

A Taste of Anna’s Talents

Anna-pastamachineIs this article making your mouth water? Come see Anna on Tuesday, March 10 at 6 pm, when she offers Pasta, Pasta, Pasta! Students will learn to make delicious pasta dough for ravioli and lasagna, as well as a collection of sauce recipes. Register here!

Anna has also graciously volunteered to coordinate the catering and food service for the ACAC’s upcoming event, Glitter and Glue: An Evening with Kelly Corrigan on March 20. This promises to be an exciting evening of good food, live music, and a wonderful presentation and book signing by NY Times best-selling author Kelly Corrigan. The event is part of Corrigan’s “Glitter and Glue for Good,” (#ggforgood) benefitting a variety of non-profits across the United States. Register here!

Stoneware Fish, Monkey Muffins and More Summer Highlights

Posted on: September 11th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks
Edible Art Campers

Edible Art Campers

“She said she loved camp everyday!” That is just one of the dozens of rave reviews pouring into our office, in the wake of the ACAC Summer Arts Camp schedule. Now that school is back in session, we miss the excitement and creativity sparked by children dancing and skipping through our building, making all kinds of colorful projects—some of them even edible, and seeing their fantastic imaginations at work. We hope we sparked a life-long appreciation of the arts, and we hope they return for After School Classes and/or next year’s Summer Arts Camps.

Sewing Camp!

Sewing Camp!

Until then, we are thankful for much positive feedback and want to share a few reviews:

  • Mr. Jack is wonderful. Kind and patient! Great instructor!
  • I am impressed with the quantity, variety, and quality of projects. She liked the drawing projects best.
  • This was an amazing camp and it definitely met all my expectations.
  • End of class presentation was excellent.
  • Mr. Gilmore was an excellent instructor and the class project was enjoyed by my son.
  • They came home talking about all the great things they learned each day!
  • The best (comment) is “look what I can do!”
  • Enjoyable experience – nice that parents/siblings can have some tasty treats too.
  • “I love it Mom! The teachers are so nice. We make great food!”
Learn to Play Guitar Camp

Learn to Play Guitar Camp

Fun with Impressionism Camp

Fun with Impressionism Camp

On the questionnaires, parents were asked to rate their child(ren)’s arts camps on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the highest rating. When we tallied the results, we found that:

  • More than 8 in 10 parents gave us a rating of “5.”
  • 95% of all parents rated our camps as being either a “4” or “5.”
  • For enjoyment of projects, parents’ average rating was 4.86
  • Parents’ average rating of summer arts camp teachers was 4.89
  • Did the class meet your expectation? Parents’ average rating was 4.77.
Photo Camp project!

Photo Camp project!

Fun with Weaving Camp

Fun with Weaving Camp

What did your child enjoy most? Here are just a sampling of the happy answers:

  • Making stoneware fish
  • Rolling the dough for monkey muffins
  • Using the big loom
  • I liked making new friends
  • The watermelon cake
  • Working with the candy clay
  • Creating comic book
  • Making a mug
  • Learning how to make pottery on wheel. Lots of fun!
  • Making the apron
  • Making the bracelets
  • Having a nice teacher
Preschoolers work on their Hungry Caterpillar books

Campers work on their Hungry Caterpillar books

What projects were your child’s favorites? When asked this question, we received more than 100 different answers. So, we got creative and made a piece of “word art” to demonstrate the answers! The larger words were responses we received multiple times. Enjoy!

Fave Art Projects Summer 2014

 

Are you inspired? Click here for our current Class Schedule including all Adult Classes, Preschool Classes and After School Classes. And enjoy a few more summer memories, below:

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Under the Sea Camp

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Dance Camp!

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Comic Book Camp

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Cooking Extravaganza campers enjoy their soft pretzels

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Edible art creations!

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Cooking Extravaganza Camp

 

Have I Got a Story for You!! Storytelling and More Camp

Have I Got a Story for You!! Storytelling and More Camp

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Sewing is Fun Camp

Beat the “Dog Days of Summer” with an Art Camp for Kids

Posted on: July 2nd, 2014 by Karen Hendricks
Image courtesy of Gualberto107 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Gualberto107 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

“The Dog Days of Summer”—approximately July 3 through August 11—is known as the hottest, most uncomfortable period of summer. This sultry, humid time period is named for the movement of Sirius, the dog star, as it aligns with the sun in the summer night sky.

Parents usually know when the Dog Days of Summer hit too… it’s the same time period when the phrase “I’m bored” starts to strike their households. But thankfully the ACAC has a full lineup of summer boredom-busting arts camps to help families survive the Dog Days of Summer—and beyond!

Here are a few highlights:

Ballerinas & Bears Returns, (ages 3-5), July 7-11, 9:00-11:00 am    

If you’re a beginner ballerina or dancer, this fun-filled class is for you and if you’re returning for a second time, new music and moves provided!  You’ll learn the elements of ballet and creative movement, wear your favorite costumes, and we’ll have a dancing teddy bear party and performance at the end of the week.  Elizabeth Spicer $90 (member $83) Ballerina& Bears Returns Registration

Hungry, Hungry Caterpillar, (ages 6-8), July 7-11, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Love the colorful collages Eric Carle uses to illustrate his picture books?  Learn to paint, cut, & assemble paper to make stunning collages of your own!  Then you’ll illustrate your own book.  Create something new every day and assemble your book at the end of the week to share at our Arty Party! Dawn Magee $155 (member $145) Hungry, Hungry Registration

Eric Carle

Project Runway:  Time Travel Fashion, (ages 10-14), July 7-11, 1:00-4:00 pm 

Explore the fascinating evolution of women’s fashion.  Each day you’ll create a fun fashion object from a different period in history using fabric, found objects, embellishments – and your imagination!  Our journey through fashion will begin with the Victorian Era and travel to the present day.  You’ll create a decorative fan, a flapper’s headband, a wrap, and together the group will design a piece inspired by a famous woman!  End the week with a fashion show featuring your own handmade creations!  Debbie Westmoreland $155 (member $145) Project Runway Registration

Fun with Weaving, (ages 9-11) – July 14-18, 9:00-12:00 noon    (max. 10 students)

Weaving is really fun and easy to do!  Begin your weaving experiences by using simple, inexpensive looms and materials.  Learn basic weaving techniques, designs and patterning with a variety of colored and textured yarns to create your own unique woven treasures.  Joh Ricci  $155 (member $145) Fun with Weaving Registration

Building 3D (ages 11-14), July 14-18, 10:00 am-1:00 pm

What’s 3D?  3D is art that’s not flat.  If you love working with your hands, here’s your opportunity to be a sculptor!  Construct a 3D sculpture using clay that’s carved and ready to hang on a wall.  Make a clay box, a wire sculpture influenced by a Calder mobile or a sculpture of your choosing exploring various media.  The materials are yours to shape.   Sally Becker $155 (members $145) Building 3D Registration

Sweet Treat Baking & Edible Art, (ages 9-14), July 14-18, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. (Max of 10 students)

Experience just how creative baking and decorating desserts can be!  You’ll learn a variety of tricks for expressing your creativity in the kitchen – like drawing chocolate flowers when decorating a cake, making and decorating small fondant cakes, building a planter out of an ice cream cone – even making sculptures with chocolate and candy clay.  Yummy fun!   Lori Nelson  $155 (member $145) Sweet Treat Registration

Image courtesy of zole4 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of zole4 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Super Heroes Comic Book Camp!  (ages 8-11) July 21-25, 9:00-12:00 p.m.

Create your own unique characters as you develop your own super heroes!  Learn how to develop the dynamics of the face, the art of exaggeration and body construction.  Create your own costume designs as well as simple perspectives to create a cityscape.  This camp is great for artists who’d like to develop their drawing skills while using their imagination. Stanley Gilmore  $155 (members $150) Super Heros Registration

Express Yourself Through Impressionist Art! (ages 8-11) July 21-25, 1:00-4:00 p.m.

Learn about famous Impressionist artists and this fascinating art movement.  Practice pointillism like Seurat.  Experiment with pastels like Degas.  Create fun Matisse-inspired collages using mixed media.  Paint like artists Monet and Cezanne.  Gather a deeper understanding of this magical Paris-based art movement while uncovering your own artistic talents. Melissa Jackson  $155 (member $145) Impressionist Registration

Cooking Extravaganza! (ages 10-14) July 21-25, 9:00-12:00 noon

Do you love food?  Spend a week with us crafting delectable recipes that are tasty, nutritious and fun to make! You’ll make banana berry smoothies, fresh salsa, tostadas and pitas with the fixings, tuna mac and cheese, and lasagna roll-ups for yourself, friends, and family!  Get cooking tips from an experienced instructor while learning all about the equipment, utensils and   kitchen safety! Linda Fauth  $158 (members $148) Cooking Extravaganza Registration

Fun Behind the Lens! (ages 11 & Up), July 28-August 1 , 1:00-4:00 p.m. 

Do you love to look at life through a camera lens?  This camp is for you!  You’ll learn everything you need to know to take great photos, experiment with composition and expand the boundaries of your camera by using still subjects and class members as models.  Create and print your favorite shots from the week as well as an 11” by 14” collage of favorite images taken by the class.  Remember to bring your camera to class! Bert Danielson  $150 (members $140) Fun Behind the Lens!  Registration

 

 

Angela’s Story

Posted on: May 20th, 2014 by Karen Hendricks

“The arts council staff took me in as if I was a member of their family.”

Making Friends: Ballerinas & Bears Summer Camp, ACAC, Summer 2013

Making Friends: Ballerinas & Bears Summer Camp, ACAC, Summer 2013

Angela, a single mom in Gettysburg, was walking by the arts council with her young daughters last year when something pulled them inside to explore.

“We saw their list of summer camps right away and I signed them up. I was so excited for them to have this experience and not just rely on me to be their teacher all summer.”

A student at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, Angela’s husband had recently left her, and without support, she was concerned that the girls might not be able to follow through and attend their camps—Ballerinas and Bears for both 5-year old Ella and 3-year old Callie, and Eric Carle Style Collages for Ella.

When she expressed concern to arts council staff, her fears were dispelled right away. “They immediately offered scholarship forms and even helped me fill them out. They took me in as if I was a member of their family,” Angela explains.

As it turns out, Angela was able to pay for the girls’ camps, so she turned down the scholarship offer so that other children might benefit. “But the fact that the scholarship fund was there, was so helpful. I was caught in a situation where the money wasn’t there at first, yet I felt strongly that my daughters have these experiences.”

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Callie enjoyed “Ballerinas and Bears” in the ACAC’s studio space

Ballerinas and Bears was a “hit” with both girls, according to Angela. “The teacher was wonderfully open and willing to let them have fun. They both got very enthusiastic about dance!”

Additionally, Angela thinks of Ella’s experiences as very nurturing. “I saw that she was starting to define herself as an artist—it is her calling. So the idea of art camp just thrilled her. I’ve been artistic my entire life too, and I want to support that (interest in Ella).”

Angela even used Ella’s artwork to create a project of her own—a calendar for her parents. “It was much more advanced artwork than a 5-year-old is usually allowed to do in school.”

“The entire experience was just terrific for both girls.”

Ella proudly shows some of her Eric Carle-inspired creations

Ella proudly shows some of her Eric Carle-inspired creations

Check out the 2014 Summer Camp Schedule by clicking here!

A summer camp in visual or culinary arts, music, theater, dance, and more is the perfect way to ensure your child continues growing, learning and having fun this summer!

Click here for the youth scholarship form (available in English in Spanish)–look under the Children’s Summer Camps section.

Click here to help make camps and classes accessible to all of the children in our community.

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