Adams County Arts Council – Supporting the arts in Adams County, PA

Posts Tagged ‘music’

The Artful History of the ACAC

Posted on: April 12th, 2018 by Elle Lamboy

By Polly Patrono-Carlson

In 1993, a chance meeting between Judy Marti and Mark Merrifield set into motion a change that would artistically effect Adams County.  The early 1990s saw a financial crisis within the public schools in Adams County.  On the ladder of importance, arts education was the first to go.  The cuts in art funding within the schools was a call to action for Judy, Mark and a group of like-minded citizens.

It started with surveys.  What would you want an arts council to do and what is needed? School administrators, teachers, and leaders in the community were asked and over 1,100 surveys, just from the schools, were sent back.  It gave the members of the early Arts Council the affirmation that there was a need for the arts in the community.  That survey provided a roadmap for the present day Adams County Arts Council.

The meetings began in homes and the library but soon there was a need for office space.  After a small office in the late 90s, a larger office was rented on Carlisle Street and it would become the home of the Imagination Station in 2006, which provided children with classes in the arts.

The early years

It then became obvious that it was time for another outreach to the community.  In 2008, the Big Canvass was sent out to the community in hopes of gaining information of what was wanted and needed for the future.  The takeaway was more, more classes, more space, and more help for low income students.

Classes at the ACAC, 1990s

The board started to look for a building and financing.  They were able to secure a loan from the USDA and created a capital campaign.  The hard work paid off and in 2011, the Arts Council building on Washington Street was opened.  It staffed 6 people, offered more classes, more help for low income seniors and children, a space for art and a place for the community to gather.

Today, the ACAC continues to flourish.  Chris Glatfelter, the executive director, sees the Arts Council helping with all aspects within the community.  Programs with autistic children, veterans, and seniors are all areas being implemented and explored.  She says, “art can improve the lives of people dealing with a variety of issues.” Programs with Wellspan at Gettysburg Hospital are underway and new classes at the center are supporting mind, body and spirit.

Because of the Adams County Arts Council, 736,000 people have been served in Adams County.  The artist in residency program, first started in 1995, has provided arts education to over 200,000 students. The Arts Council’s mission to promote and share the value of the arts and cultivate an arts rich community has been flourishing since the 1990s. Judy Marti said it best, art is the “elasticity of the community brain.”  We are so fortunate to have a place to foster that elasticity.

Today, the ACAC offers a variety of classes and events to appeal to all sorts of artistic tastes and talents.

YOU can help ensure the ACAC can continue offering its quality programming and continue being the elasticity of the community by contributing to our current ABC campaign, which offers financial assistance to low-income children in our community.

Visit our website to support our artful effort.

THANK YOU! 

 

 

ABCs of the Arts: An Interview with Wendy Heiges

Posted on: April 11th, 2018 by Lisa Cadigan

by Elle Lamboy

Photo by Autumn Kern

Meet Wendy Heiges, Program and Gallery Director at the Adams County Arts Council (ACAC). Her dedication and passion not only for the arts but also for the students who benefit from arts programming are inspiring.

This week, we are raising funds for our Arts Benefit Children (ABC) scholarship fund. All proceeds from the ABC campaign help Wendy and other dedicated staff and volunteers continue to instill the gift of art in the Gettysburg community. Your contribution provides scholarships for children who may not otherwise be able to attend arts camps and classes.

We’re happy to share this interview with Wendy here.

Question: You started with ACAC first as a volunteer, then joined the executive board and became co-coordinator of classes held at the Imagination Station on Carlisle St., and then you moved to your current staff position when ACAC moved to the Arts Education Center seven years ago. What have been your fondest memories/greatest accomplishments?

Wendy: I’m grateful to have had a chance to work with and promote outstanding artist/instructors in our community and to contribute, as the Program & Gallery Director of the ACAC, to the growth and sustainability of the arts through public classes and gallery events over the past 10 years.

Question: Why should someone support the ACAC’s ABC campaign?

Wendy: Investing time and money through art enrichment programs for children allows them to keep a school mindset during summer downtime, as well as cultivate and enrich their mind, social skills, boost their math and science skills, and dream time. Studies show that there is a community need for after-school and summer camp programs which help children thrive. The ACAC’s summer camps provide hands-on art enrichment opportunities in an encouraging, small classroom environment with professional instruction.

Question: Why are the arts important to you?

Wendy: The arts help my sense of well-being flourish, give me purpose, and add beauty and value to my everyday life.

Question: What do the arts do to enhance a community?

Wendy: The arts transcend age, gender, socio-economic background, and experience. When a person picks up a paint brush, handles a mound of clay, sings a song, dances, or takes a picture, their world for that moment is magical, and the possibilities seem boundless. The arts contribute to a vibrant community by encouraging diversity and by giving anyone who would like to shine a chance and a place to do so.

Question: Why should someone take a class at the ACAC at any age?

Wendy: I believe the classes at the ACAC are developed to provide the opportunity for anyone who would like to learn a creative skill in a comfortable and welcoming environment to do so. Cultivating your inner artist makes whatever else you do better. You feel better, and when you feel better, you approach other tasks at hand with a new sense of joy and purpose. You don’t have to be a professional artist to reap the benefits of the arts. Take a class at the Arts Education Center and see where it takes you!

Donate now to the ABC Campaign! Your donation provides scholarships for children who may not otherwise be able to attend arts camps and classes.

Celebrating with Music Day and Singing Our ABC’s

Posted on: April 9th, 2018 by Lisa Cadigan

On Saturday, April 7, we celebrated our 25th Anniversary and kicked off our annual ABC campaign with Music Day. The day was a huge success. At least 125 people attended a variety of events throughout the day. We are pleased to share some photos from the day here, and also to ask you to consider a $25 donation to celebrate our 25 years. Your contribution provides scholarship funds to children who may not otherwise be able to afford to attend an arts class or camp.

We will be collecting ABC donations through Friday, April 13, so please click here to donate online, mail or stop by 125 South Washington Street, Gettysburg, with your donation, and share this post with your friends and family on social media. It’s as easy as A-B-C.

Music Day was a fun-filled family day that began with a Music Together class, led by Event Co-chair Lisa Cadigan. Following that class, participants attended an instrument petting zoo, led by students from Gettysburg College’s Music Education program.

Gettysburg College Music Education student Liz DeVito teaches a Music Day attendee how to make a clear sound with the flute.
Photo by Lisa Cadigan

There were performances by local music students from the studios of Event Co-chair Adam Cordle, Duane Botterbusch, Tim Foster, Carrie Trax, and Natalie Raymond.

Voice Teacher Carrie Trax accompanies her student Hailey Brownley during the Community Studio Showcase.
Photo by Lisa Cadigan

Gettysburg College students also led participants in the music of the Balinese Gamelan.

Gettysburg College student Brittany Barry teaches a student how to play in the Gamelan.
Photo by J. Decker photography

Following the Gamelan, participants moved over to the dance studio, where they could borrow a ukulele (or bring their own) and play and sing along to popular songs like “You Are My Sunshine,” “When the Saints Go Marching In,” and “Dust in the Wind” in a ukulele circle led by John Dufendach and Joyce Ettenger of the Cool Hand Ukes.

Ukulele Circle presenter John Dufendach of Cool Hand Ukes shows a student how to finger a chord on the ukulele.
Photo by J. Decker Photography

The day culminated with an “If Music Be the Food…” concert to support the Gettysburg Community Soup Kitchen, featuring the GKS Trio (from the studio of Adam Cordle), Adam Paul Cordle (viola), and Pomona’s Trio.

GKS Trio opens the If Music Be the Food Concert at Music Day.
Photo by Ellen Cadigan

The purpose of the day was to engage community in a celebration of the ACAC that not only allowed attendees to hear great music, but invited them to make music as well.

Finally, a huge thanks to all of our sponsors, without whom this day would not have been possible:

Adams County Arts Council
Celebrates 25th Anniversary

Posted on: January 24th, 2018 by Lisa Cadigan

Over the past 25 years, the Adams County Arts Council has grown into a regional leader in the arts and operator of a 10,000 sq. ft. education center where students and the community enjoy enriching arts experiences.  Please join us throughout the year as we celebrate the wonderful milestone of our 25th Anniversary!

Upcoming celebrations include:

25th Anniversary Celebration

Tuesday, March 13, 2018
Gettysburg Hotel, 1 Lincoln Square, Gettysburg
5 p.m. Heavy hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, silent auction
5:45 p.m. Program

$30/person; reservations by March 7 available at adamsarts.org
or 717 334-5006

Twenty five years of cultivating an arts-rich community is a milestone to celebrate! Please be a sponsor as we mark this occasion, honor outstanding volunteers, and welcome distinguished speaker Philip Horn, Executive Director Emeritus of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

Music Day: A Musical Celebration for the Adams County Arts Council’s 25th Anniversary

Saturday, April 7, 2018
10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Adams County Arts Council
Arts Education Center
125 S. Washington Street
Gettysburg, PA 17325

FREE and Open to the Public
(donations encouraged for the Adams County Arts Council and for the Gettysburg Community Soup Kitchen)

The Adams County Arts Council (ACAC), Adams County Music Makers (ACMM), Cordle Studios, the Gettysburg College music education program, Gamelan Gita Semara, and area musicians and music educators have partnered to present a family-friendly day of music in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Adams County Arts Council.

Please join us for this special event, which offers yet another example of how we’ve partnered with the community to cultivate and celebrate the arts.

The day will function as an open-house, with the following interactive and performance events tentatively scheduled:

Music Together - Adams County Music Makers10:15 – 11:00 a.m. Music Together® Demonstration Class
Adams County Music Makers
Adams County Music Makers (ACMM) is a program-in-residence at the ACAC, offering Music Together mixed ages/family classes to foster a love of music with your children, ages birth through five years old. Fun for the whole family – join us to sing, play, move, and explore musical instruments. Music Together is the leader of research-based, early-childhood music and movement programs, recognizing that everyone has the ability to sing in tune, keep a beat, and experience world cultures through music. RSVP requested, space is limited.

11:00 – 12:00 Instrumental Petting Zoo
Gettysburg College Music Education Program
Gettysburg College music education students will lead children (and interested adults!) through an instrumental petting zoo, where they can experiment with string, wind, brass, and percussion instruments.

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Community Student Showcase
Gettysburg Community Music Studios
Students from local music studios will offer performances of a variety of repertoire on instruments such as piano, strings, winds, brass and voice.

1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Community Music Making

Gamelan Gita Semara
Music Day attendees will have the opportunity to perform the music of Bali right here in Gettysburg. Gettysburg College alumna Alice Broadway will introduce community members to the instruments and techniques of Balinese gamelan. Join us for this interactive and collaborative music-making experience.

2:00 – 3:00 p.m. If Music Be the Food… Concert
If Music Be the Food… Gettysburg

“If Music Be the Food…” is a series of benefit concerts whose mission is to raise awareness and support for the hungry in the local community through the sharing of great music, and to teach music students about the importance of utilizing their art for service. All participants in every aspect of the endeavor volunteer their services and pay their own costs, so all proceeds can go directly to the hungry. No tickets will be sold for the concert; rather, audience members are invited to contribute monetary donations or non-perishable food items to the Gettysburg Community Soup Kitchen.

Please join us for music, fellowship, food, and fun as we celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Adams County Arts Council. For more information, contact Lisa Cadigan at director@adamscountymusic.com, Adam Paul Cordle at director@cordlestudios.org, call the ACAC at (717) 334-5006, or visit www.adamsarts.org.

Jingle Ball

Saturday, December 15, 2018
Gettysburg National Military Park Visitors Center

Black tie gala celebrating the Adams County Arts Council’s 25th Anniversary

 

 

The Adams County Arts Council is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization.
The mission of the Adams County Arts Council is to cultivate an arts-rich community.

 

 

Fifth Annual Art at the Winery

Posted on: September 15th, 2015 by Lisa Cadigan

by Polly Patrono-Carlson

wine-bottle-sizes-4If you go back to the Greeks and Romans, they talk about all three – wine, food, and art – as a way of enhancing life.

~Robert Mondavi

On September 20, Hauser Estate Winery will host the 5th annual Art at the Winery, a large outdoor art show featuring art, music, demonstrations and wine. Every year, members of the Adams County Arts Council come up the hill to present their works of art in this tranquil and beautiful setting.  The event is free and open to the public, and includes live music and demonstrations.  Art, great food, and wine can be purchased.

Gloria Saloky will be demonstrating Belly Dancing from 1:30-2:00 p.m. and Erica Woodworth will be doing a wheel throwing demonstration from 3:30-4:00 p.m.

Along with paintings and pottery, there will be Plein Art Artist painting the fabulous Hauser Estate scenery.Hauser Arts & Vinyards2 005

Wander around, gaze, sip, and listen to music by Ron Nicodemus from 2-3:30. There may be a priceless work of art waiting for you to take home and enhance your life!

Hauser Arts & Vinyards2 019

 

List of artists presenting at Art at the Winery:

Sally Becker – painting, pottery and mixed media

Carrie Dietrich – artist

Moises Martinez – oil paintings

Peter Plant – plein air paintings

Erica Woodworth – pottery

Lori Nelson – pottery

Marianne Kingston – crocheted jewelry

Wendy Heiges – handmade jewelry

Anne Finucane – etchings and pastels

Laurie McKelvie – pastels

Debbie Westmoreland – fiberwork

Arts Council table

Bert Danielson – photography

Larry Brogan – photography

Ciji Lo’Ren – leather purses

Dave Laskowski – black and white photography

Caroline Laskowski   fiber artist, beaded bags

Food by Sherry Freeman at Ragged Edge.

 

In the Spirit of Gratitude

Posted on: December 15th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

artisagift

grat·i·tude (noun) the quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation and to return kindness.

Holiday traditions encourage us to take pause and to appreciate the many gifts we receive throughout our lives, so often taken for granted.

As you reflect on the things for which you are thankful this year, and make your list of gifts to give, please remember the organizations in our community that add so much to our lives, like the Adams County Arts Council.

Why should I be thankful for ACAC?
In 2014, ACAC provided our community with educational opportunities like camps, classes and brown bag lunch seminars.  Artists-in-residence shared their expertise providing creative experiences for over 1,500 students. There were social opportunities like the Masquerade Ball, the summer fiesta and Tea with Mamie. There were exhibits throughout the year, both at the Center and throughout the community in places like the Farmer’s Market and Hauser’s Winery, as well as a Juried Art Exhibition at Schmucker Hall, which attracted more than 100 artists.  There were community partnerships like the AOK summer musical, Tarzan, and the evening with scholar and retired  Rhode Island Chief Justice Frank J. Williams, whose Lincoln stories were coupled with a lovely culinary experience, thanks to a partnership with Wendy Allen of Lincoln into Art.

2014 was a year of giving for the Adams County Arts Council, which is constantly evolving with new ways to cultivate an arts-rich community.

From December 16 – 18, ACAC will be raising funds online to ensure the continued ability to provide our community with enriching experiences, activities and educational opportunities.  Our goal is to raise $7,200 in 72 hours, and you can help.

Give Back…And Pass It On.
Acknowledging the treasury the arts provides to our community, can you give a gift back to the arts this time of year? It’s simple to ensure that the arts will continue to thrive in Adams County for years to come: just give back, and pass it on. Both steps are important, and we appreciate your support.

1. Give back.
Beginning tomorrow, and continuing through Thursday, ACAC is hosting a special online fundraising event. Make your gift of $50, $100, $250 or in any amount you have to give by clicking here. We are hoping to raise $7,200 in 72 hours, but we need your help!

2. Pass it on.
Share the gift of giving with your friends through your social media accounts or by email. Passing this post on to as many people as possible will build our creative community, ensuring future success.  Click the icons below and share, share, share!

3. Stay tuned. If you haven’t already subscribed, please sign up to receive emails from ACAC (Enter your email address at the top of this page, on the right.) Learn about all of the opportunities ACAC has for you throughout the year. And watch our Facebook and Twitter feeds, as we update progress of this fantastic online event!

Kelly Corrigan (Photo Credit: Betsy Barnes)

Kelly Corrigan (Photo Credit: Betsy Barnes)

We thank you in advance for your gift. Donors of $50 or more will receive recognition on the blog and in a special holiday email greeting following the campaign. Givers of $250 or more will be entered into a raffle for a free class at the ACAC this January or for a ticket to our upcoming event with NY Times Best-selling Author Kelly Corrigan in March.
Enjoy this season of giving!

‘Tis the Season for our Holiday Show & Sale

Posted on: November 20th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Article by Elle Lamboy, ACAC Marketing & Development Committee

Photo-3---Holiday-Show---2014

The chewy bite of an iced sugar cookie. Red cups at Starbucks. The undeniable scent of pine.  Carols singing on the radio while bells ring in the street. Quality time with food, family and friends.

These festive traditions ignite a certain kind of magic, often juxtaposed by a more stressful reality of holiday shopping.

Fortunately, the Adams County Arts Council’s (ACAC) annual Holiday Show and Sale transforms the frantic buzzkill of holiday shopping into an enjoyable art.

The Show & Sale features about 50 member artists who will have the rare opportunity to “showcase a collection of their work as opposed to just one piece,” says Wendy Heiges, Program Director at the ACAC. “It gives local artists a platform to sell and exhibit their work that they wouldn’t have otherwise.”

This year promises a wonderfully eclectic collection with something creative for everyone on your shopping list—including photography, pottery, stationary, hand-painted ornaments, centerpieces, textiles, jewelry and so much more. A full list of participating artists can be found here.

singingThe Holiday Show & Sale will officially kick off on First Friday, December 5, from 5:00 p.m. -7:30 p.m. This festive and fun reception will feature holiday confections, music from Pomona’s Trio (left, featuring ACAC Board Member Lisa Cadigan on vocals, ACAC culinary instructor Marc Jalbert on guitar, and Gettysburg College professor Bret Crawford on saxophone), carols from the Gettysburg Children’s Choir High School Ensemble, and the opportunity to get first dibs on hand-crafted, local gifts.

Your patronage not only supports local artists in the community; it also helps the ACAC, which will receive a 40% commission for all gifts and artwork purchased.

To get a head start on your holiday shopping, the ACAC will be open for “sneak previews” of the show beginning Tuesday, November 25.  Please visit our website to view our extended holiday hours and schedule or give us a call. For your convenience, the Show & Sale is featured in the reception hall this year which is located just left of the entrance to the Center.

The ACAC’s  annual Holiday Show and Sale channels all that is wonderful about the holidays—the joy of giving, the awakening of the senses and the importance of giving back to our community—leaving the crowds and chaos behind!

You’ll be pleasantly surprised at all we have in store, and may even find your inner artist in the process.

Stay tuned to our blog for updates throughout the sale, including special demos from participating artists!

Questions?  Call (717) 334-5006.

Photo---Holiday-Show---2014[2]

Once upon a time…

Posted on: May 7th, 2014 by Lisa Cadigan

Arts Benefit Children - An Online Event - May 20-22Once upon a time, there was a middle-aged woman.  Every Monday, she woke up, made coffee, woke her children, made breakfast, nagged at them to brush their teeth and put on their shoes, and then drove them to school to start their day.  She continued on to her workplace, where she usually spent the first ten to fifteen minutes of her day checking email and perusing Facebook; a comforting routine to ease herself from the role of mother to the role of employee, ready to tackle the tasks on her to-do list.

One day, as she sat at her computer, a beautiful, brightly colored-image danced across her Facebook newsfeed.  “Arts Benefit Children!” it said.  “Well, of course the arts benefit children,” she thought to herself, and so she clicked. Here is what she read:

Postcard-web“SAVE THE DATE!  On May 20-22, you will have an opportunity to help the Adams County Arts Council raise $4,800 in 48 hours!  We are harnessing the power of the internet to reach out to thousands of people, who can change the lives of children and make the world a better place with just the click of a button!”

“Hmmm…I’m a little skeptical,” she thought to herself.  But she read on.  It turned out that an old friend of hers was involved in the fundraiser, and had posted the colorful image.  She clicked the “donate” button, sent in ten dollars, and then shared the link on her Facebook page, in an attempt to reconnect with her friend.  Her donation surprisingly brought on the sense that she had already accomplished something helpful and important that day, and it was only 8:45 a.m.  “Huh,” she thought. “Simple mouse-clicks do have the capability of affecting people.  But why would anyone want to donate to an organization with which they may not have a personal connection?”

The answer came to her surprisingly quickly.  She suddenly remembered a painting class she took as a third grader.  She had just moved to a new city and school where she hadn’t yet made friends.  She was lonely and worried she would never adjust.  At the beginning of the class, she couldn’t think of anything to paint, so she decided she would just choose colors to paint “lonely.”  The result was a beautiful painting in blues and greens, and her teacher shared it with the rest of the class.  At the end of class, another student approached her and told her how much she liked the painting.  The girl was still her friend thirty years later.  Art had changed her life in that moment.

A man in another state, who knew the woman in college, saw the brightly colored image pop up in his newsfeed.  Seeing her name attached to the post unexpectedly flooded him with college memories. He recalled a meeting with his freshman advisor, who told him he was required to take an art class.  “I don’t want to take an art class,” he had thought at the time. “I’m a mathematician, not an artist.”  But his advisor explained that the art class was a requirement for graduation.  So he decided on an acting class.  He realized he had been using principles from the class every day in his classroom as a math teacher. Thanks to that acting class, he was comfortable in front of a crowd and better able to read the faces of his students.  Not to mention, he met his wife in that acting class.

He called his wife, and nostalgically recounted the memory of their meeting place, telling her about the post on Facebook.  “I am sharing it with you right now,” he said.  “You should share it with your artsy-friends and donate a dollar or two.”  She laughed, because she and her husband often playfully debated the differences in their educations; his was much more math and science-based, while she had been a music major with a minor in English.  They were both highly intelligent people, and both were teachers now, touching the lives of future generations with skills polished at least partially, if not entirely, by their experiences with art.

She shared the Facebook post, too, and donated five dollars.  As she read the stories across shared posts, she was deeply touched.  She had been the recipient of a music scholarship in the fourth grade that allowed her to take violin lessons.  Her family could not afford the instrument rental without that scholarship, and if she had not taken those lessons, she would never have tapped into the musical part of herself that filled her heart and life so significantly.  She realized the scholarship was the reason she taught elementary orchestra now.  She tweeted and emailed the fundraiser information to all of her colleagues.

This is how it works. 

Every day, we connect with people, and the common source of our human connection is creativity.   Whether it is telling a joke, watching a movie, writing a business memo, or writing a novel, the source of human connection requires a creative thought and a medium through which it can be expressed.

In the coming weeks, we will share real stories of kids who have benefitted from scholarships. You can be part of giving them the tools to creatively contribute to their relationships, careers and to the quality of life in our communities.

Do you have an art story?  Will you share it, along with this invitation to help others write theirs?

If just 480 people donate $10 each, we can offer scholarships to more than thirty disadvantaged young people.  We can unleash the creative potential in children who may not otherwise be able to tap into such a venue.

Don’t have $10 to spare?  Donate just $5.  Or $1.  Every dollar counts – a click and a dollar or two makes a difference with unlimited potential connections

How can you get involved?  It’s as easy as A-B-C:

A. Visit our donation page between May 20 and 22nd
https://adamsarts.org/sponsorship
Donate a dollar.  Or $5.  Or $10.  Or more, if you feel so inspired.  But know that every dollar counts.

B. Share this story with your friends, and encourage them to play along and donate, too.

C. Come back to the blog to hear stories about past scholarship recipients who have enjoyed classes and camps here, and track our progress.

We look forward to hearing from you soon!

lisaandkaren

 

 

 

Lisa Cadigan is a director on the Adams County Arts Council’s board and the chair of ACAC’s Marketing & Development Committee. She is also the sole proprietor of Cadigan Creative, where she offers graphic design and marketing services.  You can  find out more about Lisa on the Cadigan Creative website, and see samples of her writing on her blog, Daily Presents.

Karen Hendricks is a volunteer on the Adams County Arts Council’s marketing and development committee and the owner/president of Hendricks Communications, LLC.  Karen demonstrates a love of writing and communicating in all she does; it’s the common thread linking all of her current and past experiences.  Her communications firm provides compelling public relations and marketing services to a select but varied group of clients. You can find out more about Karen on the Hendricks Communications website and see additional samples of her writing on her blog, Off the Merry-Go-Round.

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